The Magdalenes: Prostitution in the Nineteenth Century [NOOK Book]

Overview

The nineteenth century witnessed a discursive explosion around the subject of sex. Historical evidence indicates that the sexual behaviour which had always been punishable began to be spoken of, regulated, and policed in new ways. Prostitutes were no longer dragged through the town, dunked in lakes, whipped and branded. Medieval forms of punishment shifted from the emphasis on punishing the body to punishing the mind.


Building on the work of ...

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The Magdalenes: Prostitution in the Nineteenth Century

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Overview

The nineteenth century witnessed a discursive explosion around the subject of sex. Historical evidence indicates that the sexual behaviour which had always been punishable began to be spoken of, regulated, and policed in new ways. Prostitutes were no longer dragged through the town, dunked in lakes, whipped and branded. Medieval forms of punishment shifted from the emphasis on punishing the body to punishing the mind.


Building on the work of Foucault, Walkowitz, and Mort, Linda Mahood traces and examines new approached emerging throughout the nineteenth century towards prostitution and looks at the apparatus and institutions created for its regulation and control. In particular, throughout the century, the bourgeoisie contributed regularly to the discourse on the prostitution problem, the debate focusing on the sexual and vocational behaviour of working class women. The thrust of the discourse, however, was not just repression or control but the moral reform – through religious training, moral education, and training in domestic service – of working class women.


With her emphasis on Scottish 'magdalene' homes and a case study of the system of police repression used in Glasgow, Linda Mahood has written the first book of its kind dealing with these issues in Scotland. At the same time the book sets nineteenth-century treatment of prostitutes in Scotland into the longer run of British attempts to control 'drabs and harlots', and contributes to the wider discussion of 'dangerous female sexuality' in a male-dominated society.

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Editorial Reviews

Booknews
Building on the work of Foucault, Walkowitz and Mort, Mahood traces and examines new approaches emerging throughout the 19th century toward prostitution and looks at the apparatus and institutions created for its regulation and control. Her focal point is Scottish "magdalene" homes and the system of police repression used in Glasgow. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)
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Product Details

Table of Contents

Introduction: The Deployment of 'Dangerous' Female Sexualities Part 1: The Birth of Social Medicine and the State 1. 'Harlots, Witches and Bar-maids': Prostitution, Disease, and the State, 1497 – 1800 2. A Medical Model of Immorality: The Glasgow Lock Hospital 3. Familiarity with the Illicit Part 2: Philanthropy, Piety, and the State 4. An Invitation to Discourse 5. The Domestication of 'Fallen' Women 6. Friendless, Fallen and Inebriate Women: The Transformations Part 3: The Glasgow System: Police Repression or Veiled Regulation? 7. Fighting the 'Multitudinous Amazonian Army' 8. Police Repression or Veiled Regulation? Conclusion: Prostitutes, Magdalenes, and Wayward Girls: Dangerous Sexualities of Working-class Women

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