The Magic Window: American Television, 1939-1953 / Edition 1

Paperback (Print)
Used and New from Other Sellers
Used and New from Other Sellers
from $11.74
Usually ships in 1-2 business days
(Save 73%)
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (4) from $11.74   
  • New (1) from $0.00   
  • Used (3) from $11.74   

Overview

First published in 2002. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780789015068
  • Publisher: Taylor & Francis
  • Publication date: 1/15/2003
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 246
  • Product dimensions: 5.90 (w) x 8.20 (h) x 0.70 (d)

Table of Contents

  • Preface
  • Chapter 1. The Beginning of Everything
  • Television's Debut
  • The Jenkins Television System
  • RCA Television
  • Television's First Season
  • Test-Marketing in Newburgh
  • The FCC's First Report on TV
  • The Amber Light
  • Hearings in Washington
  • Chapter 2. A Torch of Hope
  • The Future Appears in Newburgh
  • The War in Europe
  • The 1940 Republican Convention
  • A Disappointing Fall
  • Debating TV's Future in 1941
  • Chapter 3. In a Troubled World
  • The 1941 FCC Hearings
  • The Beginning of Commercial TV
  • The Summer of 1941
  • The Buildup to War
  • Wartime Television
  • Schenectady's WRGB
  • Plans for Postwar TV
  • Television As a War Weapon
  • The Studios Reopen
  • TV's First Censored Program
  • Chapter 4. The Winds of Postwar
  • The Homefront TV War
  • The 1944 Conventions
  • TV Programs Blossom Again
  • Docket No. 6651
  • TV and the End of the War
  • Chapter 5. Turning the Corner
  • The Camera with the Eyes of a Cat
  • TV Begins in Washington
  • The Louis-Conn Fight
  • Hour Glass
  • The New Postwar Sets
  • The Bikini Bomb Explosion
  • Surveying the TV Viewer
  • The Emerging Genres
  • Drama in Washington
  • The First Color Telecasts
  • Integration on TV
  • The Second Wave of TV Stations
  • The “Split” TV Audience
  • Television and Women
  • Middlebrow Television
  • Chapter 6. From Boom to Berle
  • The 1947 World Series
  • Puppet Playhouse
  • The Expanding Network
  • The “Original Amateur” Network
  • “Miss Television of 1948”
  • “Mr. Television”
  • The 1948 Conventions
  • The Cold War on Television
  • CBS's Revival
  • The Big Freeze
  • The 1948 Election
  • Selling Sugar and Tobacco
  • Radio Takes Notice
  • Chapter 7. Conflicts in the Air
  • Kukla, Fran and Ollie
  • The Cultural Backlash Begins
  • Censoring TV's Contents
  • The “Golden Hope” and The Goldbergs
  • The Admiral Broadway Revue
  • The Berle Phenomenon
  • A Midseason Slump
  • Wrestling and Roller Derby
  • The 1949 World Series
  • The Chicago School of Television
  • Cavalcade of Stars
  • Hopalong Cassidy
  • The New Bomb and the “Red Scare”
  • Faye Emerson
  • TV's Effects on Children
  • Chapter 8. Comics and Communists
  • Your Show of Shows
  • The “Bandit Raid” on Korea
  • Red Channels
  • The Invasion of Comics
  • Jack Benny and Fred Allen
  • Groucho Marx and Martin and Lewis
  • Jackie Gleason and the Cavalcade of Stars
  • Truman and MacArthur
  • Expanding the Daily Schedule
  • Chapter 9. Linking Coast to Coast
  • Color TV Begins
  • The Crime Commission Hearings
  • Amos 'n' Andy
  • Hollywood and the Coast-to-Coast Link
  • The Birth of I Love Lucy
  • The “Hollywood Boom” Begins
  • The Today Show
  • New Hampshire and “Ike”
  • The Freeze Is Lifted
  • Lucy Takes Over
  • The 1952 Conventions
  • Congress and the Code
  • The FCC and Blacklisting
  • Dragnet
  • Live Drama from New York
  • Chapter 10. Liking Ike and Loving Lucy
  • The Checkers Speech
  • Lucy is Pregnant
  • Ozzie and Harriet
  • See It Now
  • The Birth and the Inauguration
  • The ABC-Paramount Merger
  • The End of the Du Mont Network
  • The End of the Beginning
  • Notes
  • Index
  • Reference Notes Included
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 5 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 18, 2003

    MORE THAN MEMORIES

    Reading THE MAGIC WINDOW brought back many memories of some of my wife, and my favorite TV programs, such as The Texaco Star Theater, Studio One, Play House Ninety, The Goldbergs, I Remember Mama, Kukla, Fran,& Ollie, the Saturday westerns, and many others. We especially enjoyed Dr. Von Schilling's thoughtful insights into the historical background of those programs and how they either affected or were affected by events in our history. We hadn't realized the role TV played during WWII, the impact of the Cold War on early television, the tight hold that the censors had on some of the early TV stars, and how TV helped shape our American history and customs. We keep referring to our copy of THE MAGIC WINDOW to share facts and tidbits about programs and programming with our friends and family. We've had some lively discussions while we reminisced! As former teachers it is very easy for us to wish that we were back in the classroom and teaching some of the material that Dr. Von Schilling presents; however,it is not just a teaching tool, but rather an enjoyable reading and discussion opportunity for every one.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 19, 2003

    The Magic Window

    Like many people of my generation, I grew up in front of the television. As far as I was concerned, there was no `history¿ of TV¿it was simply always there and I was doubtful that a book that explored television before the advent of The Brady Bunch would be as interesting and enlightening as The Magic Window is. Dr. Von Schilling¿s well-researched and highly readable book is not simply another nostalgic look at the 40s and 50s, however; rather, it traces the history and politics and sporting events of those decades and how these events seen on television for the first time shaped America¿s culture. From political campaigns to the integration of baseball to the first network censors, The Magic Window documents television¿s rapid rise and enormous popularity in the United States and tells its story from the point of view of a fan.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 24, 2003

    MORE THAN MEMORIES

    Reading THE MAGIC WINDOW brought back many memories of some of my favorite tv programs, such as The Texaco Star Theater, The Goldbergs, I Remember Mama, Kukla, Fran, & Ollie, the Saturday westerns, & many others. I especially enjoyed Dr. Von Schilling's thoughtful insights into the historical background of those programs & how they either affected or were affected by events in our history. I hadn't realized the role tv played during WWII, the impact of the Cold War on early television, the tight hold that the censors had on some of the early tv stars, & how tv helped shape our American history & customs. I keep referring to my copy of THE MAGIC WINDOW to share facts and tidbits about programs & programming with my friends & family. We've had some lively discussions while we reminisce!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 10, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted February 10, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 5 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)