The Man Who Sold the World: David Bowie and the 1970s

The Man Who Sold the World: David Bowie and the 1970s

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by Peter Doggett
     
 

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The Man Who Sold the World by Peter Doggett—author of the critically acclaimed Beatles biography, You Never Give Me Your Money—is a song-by-song chronicle of the evolution of David Bowie.

Focusing on the work and the life of one of the most groundbreaking figures in music and popular culture during the turbulent seventies, Bowie&

Overview

The Man Who Sold the World by Peter Doggett—author of the critically acclaimed Beatles biography, You Never Give Me Your Money—is a song-by-song chronicle of the evolution of David Bowie.

Focusing on the work and the life of one of the most groundbreaking figures in music and popular culture during the turbulent seventies, Bowie’s most productive and innovative period, The Man Who Sold the World is the book that serious rock music lovers have been waiting for.

By exploring David Bowie’s individual achievements and breakthroughs one-by-one, Doggett paints a fascinating portrait of the performer who paved the way for a host of fearless contemporary artists, from Radiohead to Lady Gaga.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Taking for his unabashed model Revolution in the Head, the late Ian MacDonald’s seminal work on the Beatles, Doggett’s meticulous song-by-song analysis of David Bowie’s “long decade” (1969–1980) is a captivating look at an artist who defined an era. Best read while listening to the Bowie songs in question—for appropriate ambience and because Doggett’s analysis gets technical when dissecting the chord structure of favorites such as “Changes”—Doggett’s nontraditional rock biography traces Bowie’s early life and career through the 1980 release of his Scary Monsters LP. Throughout, he emphasizes the singer’s infatuation with shifting personae, from Ziggy Stardust to the Thin White Duke, with Bowie constantly fragmenting himself and incorporating bits and pieces from other media: for example, his Spiders from Mars band is an homage to Jack Kerouac’s On the Road. Each song Bowie released during this period is given careful attention—from the tonal structure to Bowie’s fellow musicians and his (often cocaine-addled) state of mind—not just the “greatest hits,” though it’s especially illuminating that the “decade” is loosely bookended by “Space Oddity” and “Ashes to Ashes.” The songs’ Major Tom, adrift above Earth, Doggett convincingly argues, is not unlike the Bowie of today: an observer rather than a performer in the modern-day artistic world upon which he certainly left his indelible imprint. Agent: Dan Conaway. (July)
Associated Press Staff
“Meticulously researched….A wonderful opportunity to reconsider rock’s greatest chameleon.”
San Francisco Chronicle
“Packed with insight, a go-to text for anyone who wants to understanding what Doggett calls ‘the uncanny strangeness of the seventies Bowie,’ and the creative process that led to his artistic breakthroughs.”
USA Today
“Explores themes in Bowie’s most inventive period - from sexual identity to the nature of fame. Doggett’s song-by-song analysis will make obsessive fans of the ‘Ziggy Stardust’ days want to pull out their old vinyl.”
Booklist (starred review)
“A thoughtful combination of critical observation and biographical digging….Doggett’s sparkling work of biocriticism is full of entertaining anecdotes and flashes of insight.”
Booklist
"A thoughtful combination of critical observation and biographical digging….Doggett’s sparkling work of biocriticism is full of entertaining anecdotes and flashes of insight."
Rob Fitzpatrick
“Astonishing and absorbing…Expertly unpicks this explosively creative time in Bowie’s life…. [Doggett intercuts] the individually tailored song biographies with essays on everything from glam rock, minimalism and punk, to radical left-wing politics, music video and a mass of other subjects that helped shape the ideas behind Bowie’s songs.”
Toby Litt
“Doggett’s previous book, You Never Give Me Your Money: the Battle for the Soul of the Beatles, was the perfect preparation for writing about both the Seventies and Bowie.”
Library Journal
We have recently been blessed with a banquet of enlightening and entertaining books about David Bowie, several of which have been well endorsed in these pages (Paul Trynka's David Bowie: Starman and Marc Spitz's Bowie, in particular). With 1969's Space Oddity as a launching point, Doggett (You Never Give Me Your Money: The Beatles After the Breakup) details a decade of styles and influences of one of rock's most enigmatic personalities. The author examines close to 250 songs and provides a critical view regarding content, an expert analysis of recording techniques, a comprehensive account of the musicians involved, and firm social, political, and cultural context in which to view the work of the former David Jones. VERDICT There is much to enjoy here, and fans will find a complete treat in this song-by-song examination, in the decade of his greatest work, of this musical and cultural icon.—Bill Baars, Lake Oswego P.L., OR
Kirkus Reviews
Exhaustive survey of David Bowie and his music. Recent years have seen the publication of a variety of Bowie books, most notably the lengthy, impressive biographies by Marc Spitz (Bowie: A Biography, 2009) and Paul Trynka (David Bowie: Starman, 2011). Bowie is an unquestionably influential artist. However, considering all the detailed Bowie-centric material available, what else do we need to know about him? According to Doggett (You Never Give Me Your Money: The Beatles After the Breakup, 2010, etc.), too much Bowie information isn't enough. The author so reveres his subject that he decided to dissect each lyric and every note played by the Thin White Duke. The result is as comprehensive, and exhausting, as one might expect from a 450-page examination of a prolific artist's entire recorded output. This isn't to say that Doggett isn't a competent analyst. In fact, there aren't many writers who have the combination of classic-rock knowledge, reverence for an artist and sheer patience to successfully pull off this sort of project. Doggett clearly conducted massive amounts of research on his subject, offering both historical context for Bowie's albums and the genesis of nearly every tune, and he's undyingly passionate about his subject, proudly trumpeting the hits and coolly dissing the misses. For those Bowie-heads who didn't get what they needed from Spitz and Trynka, there are plenty of biographical tidbits sprinkled throughout the book. However, Doggett's book will have a limited audience. Well-executed, but for hardcore Bowie fans only.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780062097149
Publisher:
HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date:
07/31/2012
Sold by:
HARPERCOLLINS
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
512
Sales rank:
37,514
File size:
1 MB

What People are saying about this

Toby Litt
“Doggett’s previous book, You Never Give Me Your Money: the Battle for the Soul of the Beatles, was the perfect preparation for writing about both the Seventies and Bowie.”
Rob Fitzpatrick
“Astonishing and absorbing…Expertly unpicks this explosively creative time in Bowie’s life…. [Doggett intercuts] the individually tailored song biographies with essays on everything from glam rock, minimalism and punk, to radical left-wing politics, music video and a mass of other subjects that helped shape the ideas behind Bowie’s songs.”

Meet the Author

Peter Doggett's books include Are You Ready for the Country: Elvis, Dylan, Parsons and the Roots of Country Rock,the award-winning There's a Riot Going On: Revolutionaries, Rock Stars and the Rise and Fall of the '60s, and You Never Give Me Your Money: The Beatles After the Breakup, which was chosen as one of the 10 Best Books of 2010 by the Los Angeles Times.

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The Man Who Sold the World: David Bowie and the 1970s 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I love David Bowie More Then Anything