The Mannequin Man

The Mannequin Man

5.0 1
by Patrick McKeown G., Luca Di Fulvio
     
 

“Di Fulvio exposes souls with the skills of a surgeon. It’s like turning the pages of something forbidden—seductive, elegant and dangerous.”—Alan Rickman

“A wonderful first novel that will seduce the fans of deranged murderers in the style of Hannibal Lecter. And beautifully written to boot.”—RTL

Overview

“Di Fulvio exposes souls with the skills of a surgeon. It’s like turning the pages of something forbidden—seductive, elegant and dangerous.”—Alan Rickman

“A wonderful first novel that will seduce the fans of deranged murderers in the style of Hannibal Lecter. And beautifully written to boot.”—RTL

“A novel that caresses and kisses in order to violate the reader with greater ease.”—Rolling Stone

“A powerful psycho-thriller of spine-shivering intensity. Written with immense intelligence and passionate menace. Not to be read alone at night.”—The Times

“Know why she’s smiling?” he asked, pointing a small torch at the corpse. “Fish hooks. Two fish hooks at the corners of her mouth, a bit of nylon, pull it round the back of the head and tie a knot. Pretty straightforward, right?” Amaldi noticed the metallic glint at the corners of the taut mouth.

Inspector Amaldi has enough problems: a city choked by a pestilent rubbish strike, a beautiful student harassed by a telephone stalker, a colleague dying of cancer, and the mysterious disappearance of arson files concerning the city’s orphanage. Then the mutilated bodies begin to appear.

This novel of violence and decay, with its vividly portrayed characters, takes place over a few oppressive weeks in an unnamed Italian city that strongly evokes Genoa. A finalist for the European Crime Writing Prize.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
The taxidermist of the title of Di Fulvio's grim but often subtly amusing first crime novel, published in Italy in 2000 and shortlisted for the European Crime Writing Prize, relishes watching creatures die. His victims also include humans. The first policeman to realize what's going on when a series of mutilated bodies start to show up in and around a city that sounds a lot like Genoa is Chief Insp. Giacomo Amaldi, in his own depressed way as strange a character as the killer. As a garbage strike turns the city into an evil-smelling symbol of modern life, Di Fulvio deftly walks both sides of the noir line by letting us in on the joke-adding more and more problems to Amaldi's load, but always transcending dreary genre parody with a beautifully written phrase or paragraph. (Jan.) Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.
Library Journal
A psychopathic serial killer skilled at taxidermy is fashioning a human mannequin from parts of his victims in a seaside city inundated with the stench of garbage uncollected during a month-long strike. In addition, Inspector Giacomo Amaldi-still reeling from a 20-year-old trauma-has to contend with a female student's harassment, a fellow cop's pending death from cancer, and the disappearance of incriminating files. This could be the stuff of Thomas Harris except for the clumsy execution of an overextended plot in overwrought prose. The killer's identity is not much in question, but when it's revealed, suspense ebbs like air from a deflating balloon; it's difficult to care much about the characters, Amaldi in particular. (For someone whose stated role is to track down killers, he displays less competence than his deputy.) Even fans of serial killer thrillers will find it hard to take to this. Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781904738138
Publisher:
Bitter Lemon Press, Ltd
Publication date:
01/01/2007
Pages:
368
Product dimensions:
5.00(w) x 7.80(h) x 0.80(d)

Meet the Author

Luca di Fulvio, born in 1957, lives and works in Rome. He is a much acclaimed novelist, screenwriter and playwright Patrick McKeown specializes in the translation of literary fiction from the Italian.

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The Mannequin Man 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
harstan More than 1 year ago
In Italy, his passion is taxidermy. He accomplishes his craft in two clever steps. First he captures his prey and then he completes the conversion. Both stages provide his sadistic tendencies with euphoria as he appreciates the kill as much if not more so than the transformation. Still he remains ever diligent and careful not to make any mistakes especially since some of his subjects are human though he leaves behind mutilated corpses using taxidermist threads to complete his trophy. Chief Inspector Giacomo Amaldi knows he is dealing with a brilliant serial killer at a time when he already feels overwhelmed. The garbage strike has turned the city into a big dump, making all investigations smell worse than usual while a questionable fire at the nearby orphanage should be tying up his time. Instead he walks amongst the trash seeking clues to a deadly killer one stitch at a time. --- THE MANNEQUIN MAN is an excellent Italian serial killer thriller that uses satirical symbolism to delineate the human condition. Amaldi is a fascinating character as he wades through garbage in search of clues that will enable him to identify the killing taxidermist while his adversary is brilliant at both of his crafts. Police procedural fans will want to follow the Chief Inspector as he struggles to separate the trash from the clues. --- Harriet Klausner