The Manufactured Crisis: Myths, Fraud, and the Attack on America's Public Schools

Overview

The Manufactured Crisis debunks the myths that test scores in America’s schools are falling, that illiteracy is rising, and that better funding has no benefit. It shares the good news about public education. Disputing conventional wisdom, this book ignited debate in Newsweek, The New York Times, and the entire teaching profession. Winner of the American Educational Research Association book award, The Manufactured Crisis is the best source of facts and analysis for people who care about what’s really happening in...

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Overview

The Manufactured Crisis debunks the myths that test scores in America’s schools are falling, that illiteracy is rising, and that better funding has no benefit. It shares the good news about public education. Disputing conventional wisdom, this book ignited debate in Newsweek, The New York Times, and the entire teaching profession. Winner of the American Educational Research Association book award, The Manufactured Crisis is the best source of facts and analysis for people who care about what’s really happening in our schools.

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Editorial Reviews

Booknews
Berliner (psychology and education, Arizona State U.-Tempe) and Biddle (journal editor, Social Psychology of Education) debunk familiar statistics about public schools and prove that SAT scores are rising for many groups, investments in education pay off in greater student achievements and earnings, and that many private schools are not better than public schools. They examine misguided proposals for correcting fictitious problems, and offer solutions to the real problems American schools face. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780201441963
  • Publisher: Basic Books
  • Publication date: 8/28/1996
  • Pages: 432
  • Sales rank: 533,859
  • Lexile: 1460L (what's this?)
  • Product dimensions: 6.00 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 1.10 (d)

Meet the Author

David C. Berliner, Ph.D., is Regents’ Professor in the College of Education at Arizona State University, and past recipient of the Friends of Education Award from the National Education Association.Bruce J. Biddle, Ph.D., is editor of the journal Social Psychology of Education, and serves as professor of both Psychology and Sociology at the University of Missouri. David C. Berliner, Ph.D., is Regents’ Professor in the College of Education at Arizona State University, and past recipient of the Friends of Education Award from the National Education Association.Bruce J. Biddle, Ph.D., is editor of the journal Social Psychology of Education, and serves as professor of both Psychology and Sociology at the University of Missouri.

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Table of Contents

Preface
Ch. 1 Thinking About Education in a Different Way 1
Ch. 2 Myths About Achievement and Aptitude 13
Ch. 3 Other Myths About American Schools 65
Ch. 4 Why Now? 129
Ch. 5 Poor Ideas for Reform 173
Ch. 6 Real Problems of American Education 215
Ch. 7 Toward the Improvement of Education 281
Ch. 8 Fundamentals of School Improvement: Research and Compassion 343
Endnotes 351
References 363
Name Index 393
Subject Index 403
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Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 14, 2001

    'Manufactured Crisis' does not tell the facts

    David C. Berliner and Bruce J. Biddle wrote a book titled 'The Manufactured Crisis: Myths, Fraud, and the Attack on America's Public Schools'. This book claims that it is a 'myth that America spends a lot more on education than other countries'. To back up this claim, the authors presented a chart on page 67 which gives 'K-12 expenditures for education in 16 nations in 1985 (based on exchange rates in 1988)'. The reader should note that the year in which the expenditures occurred (1985) and the year of the exchange rates (1988) are different. By mismatching the year of the expenditures and the year of the exchange rates, the authors were able to inflate the level of educational expenditures for the fifteen foreign countries by an average in 49.8%. For the period 1981-1989, the dollar reached its lowest level in terms of exchange rates in 1988. Therefore, by choosing the 1988 exchange rates, the authors were able to inflate the fifteen foreign nations educational expeditures by the greatest amount. No where else in the book do they draw conclusions by mismatching the years for the exchange rates. For example, on page 225, the authors quoted a book which compared per capita income by using exchange rates where the years were not mismatched. On page 93, American worker productivity is compared with the productivity of workers in other countries. To make this comparison, the authors quoute a report which makes use of exchange rates which equalizes the price levels in the various countris. This type of exchange rate is known as purchasing power parity. If either of these methods were used to make comparisons of education spending levels in different countries, they would have to conclude that America spends more on education than most other countries. To evaluate this countries educational needs, we will need much better scholarship than is provided in this book

    2 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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