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The Many-Colored Land
     

The Many-Colored Land

4.7 9
by Julian May
 

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In the year 2034, Theo Quderian, a French physicist, made an amusing but impractical discovery: the means to use a one-way, fixed-focus time warp that opened into a place in the Rhone River valley during the idyllic Pliocene Epoch, six million years ago. But, as time went on, a certain usefulness developed. The misfits and mavericks of the future—many of them

Overview

In the year 2034, Theo Quderian, a French physicist, made an amusing but impractical discovery: the means to use a one-way, fixed-focus time warp that opened into a place in the Rhone River valley during the idyllic Pliocene Epoch, six million years ago. But, as time went on, a certain usefulness developed. The misfits and mavericks of the future—many of them brilliant people—began to seek this exit door to a mysterious past. In 2110, a particularly strange and interesting group was preparing to make the journey—a starship captain, a girl athlete, a paleontologist, a woman priest, and others who had reason to flee the technological perfection of twenty-second-century life.

Thus begins this dazzling fantasy novel that invites comparisons with the work of J.R.R. Tolkien, Arthur C. Clarke, and Ursula Le Quin. It opens up a whole world of wonder, not in far-flung galaxies but in our own distant past on Earth—a world that will captivate not only science-fiction and fantasy fans but also those who enjoy literate thrillers.

The group that passes through the time-portal finds an unforeseen strangeness on the other side. Far from being uninhabited, Pliocene Europe is the home of two warring races from another planet. There is the knightly race of the Tanu—handsome, arrogant, and possessing vast powers of psychokinesis and telepathy. And there is the outcast race of Firvulag—dwarfish, malev-o olent, and gifted with their own supernormal skills. Taken captive by the Tanu and transported through the primordial European landscape, the humans manage to break free, join in an uneasy alliance with the forest-dwelling Firvulag, and, finally, launch an attack against the Tanu city of light on the banks of a river that, eons later, would be called the Rhine.

Myth and legend, wit and violence, speculative science and breathtaking imagination mingle in this romantic fantasy, which is the first volume in a series about the exile world. The sequel, titled The Golden Torc, will follow soon.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780547892474
Publisher:
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
Publication date:
04/17/1981
Sold by:
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
415
Sales rank:
161,477
File size:
3 MB

Meet the Author

Julian May (1931) is an American science fiction and fantasy author best known for her Saga of Pilocene Exile and Galactic Milieu Series. Her first book, The Many-Colored Land published in 1981, was the first book of the Pilocene Exile series. In 2015 she was inducted into the First Fandom Hall of Fame. In addition to writing under her own name, she has also used the pen names Ian Thorne and for non-fiction books, Lee N. Falconer.

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The Many Colored Land (Pliocene Exile Series #1) 4.7 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 9 reviews.
BlueLantern More than 1 year ago
Do not buy the ebook version. The formatting is horrible. The story (and series) is absolutely amazing and should not be missed.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
but if you are a die hard fan of the genre wont care. one of my favorite series now forgotten was the exiled fire dancer and their attempt to return to home planets and the shorter circus world where the circus space ship crashes and they survive you can still find cities of steel trio live long and prosper
Patito_de_Hule More than 1 year ago
Synopsis: In the near future, an alien federation called the Galactic Milieu has intervened on Earth, and welcomed humans into the its fold. For most of humanity, the Milieu is a blessing. Long life, health, an ethical law system, the adventure of space travel - these are the perks that humans enjoy. But some feel confined by the rules of the Milieu and yearn for a simpler life. And some are too sociopathic to be accepted in the Milieu's society. These people can go into Exile - they are sent back in time to the Earth's Pliocene epoch. The Many-Colored Land follows the story of one group of exiles as they discover what lies on the other end of the time-portal. Life isn't as simple as they expect, and they are soon swept up in a world of war and conspiracy.  My thoughts: I must have read a lot more hard-core science fiction when I was a teenager, because I don't remember this book being as heavy as it felt this time around. All the descriptions of futuristic technologies / cultures slowed me down because I don't read enough science fiction to be used to the terminology. It may have been slow reading for me, but I felt refreshed by the newness of the plot. This is a very complex book, with many layers of hidden foundation. Superficially, I think the characters could have used a little more development - but I'm sure they grow throughout the series. This first book in the Pliocene quartet was mainly world-building. We were introduced to the alien cultures - both the good and the bad aspects. We got a hefty background on the Pliocene epoch. And we got some hints of how these events in the Pliocene might have impacted humanity's development millions of years later. It's a fascinating set-up, and I'm eager to see how the rest of the series plays out. I've heard so many good things about it.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Grab your imagination and settle in for a treat. Diverse characters inhabit a rich world just waiting for you to visit.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Read this series when i was a teenager and many times since. Read it you will not regret it.
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JRRnotTolkien More than 1 year ago
The Pliocene Exile sage is stunning. Julian May should bow to no author, including the greats: Arthur C. Clarke, Isaac Asimov, Ray Bradbury, etc. The description on the Pliocene Companion says that not since The Lord of the Rings has there been such an accomplishment as this, and I agree. I can't imagine why there aren't more reviews on this series. It would be very unfortunate if millions of people missed it. Just try the first book ... but get ready to buy the rest of them, because you won't be able to stop with the first one!