The Marvelous Misadventures of Fun-Boy

The Marvelous Misadventures of Fun-Boy

by Ralph Cosentino
     
 
This innovative wordless picture book contains twelve laugh-out-loud stories about a little boy looking for adventure. But all he seems to find are misadventures. In one tale, Fun-Boy rushes to put out a raging fire with the garden hose�only to douse the backyard grill and ignite the anger of his father. In another, Fun-Boy is happily swinging through aleafy

Overview

This innovative wordless picture book contains twelve laugh-out-loud stories about a little boy looking for adventure. But all he seems to find are misadventures. In one tale, Fun-Boy rushes to put out a raging fire with the garden hose�only to douse the backyard grill and ignite the anger of his father. In another, Fun-Boy is happily swinging through aleafy jungle�until he falls from his bed and realizes it was only a dream.

Designed in large-format comic book style (two panels per page, four per story), this bright, bold book will inspire children to tell each tale in their own words. It�s perfect for pre-readers!

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Unwary browsers of this volume may experience sugar overload, if not from the cutesy title then from prolonged exposure to the darling hero. Each comic "misadventure," presented as a double-page comic strip in a landscape format, requires a quartet of images to deliver the punch line. For example, firefighter Fun-Boy aims a green garden hose at a raging blaze, then balks at a column of gray smoke; in the fourth panel, it becomes clear that he has doused his dad's barbecue grill. In another spread, Fun-Boy and his cherubic classmates hold a "Down with Veggies!" protest march, then cheerfully drop their placards when they notice restaurant "Mr. Ronald's" promotion of "free toys with Broccoli Meal." In a borderline-questionable strip, Fun-Boy climbs to the top of a slide and admires a yellow bird flying by; the bird drops a dollop of white on the slide, and Fun-Boy slips in it as he descends, landing on his head. Cosentino specializes in stylized digital renderings; like the pillow and puppy of his The Story of Honk-Honk-Ashoo and Swella-Bow-Wow, the characters here have wide-set dot-eyes and moon-sliver smiles. The only characters with visible noses are the beaky Vulture Boy and his pug-nosed pal Eddie, seen bullying schoolgirl Mushy Marie on the playground until Fun-Boy (in a Lone Ranger mask) rescues her. Cosentino's superficial urchins are palatable but lack redeeming value. Ages 3-up. (Feb.) Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.
Children's Literature
Fun-Boy is an average child with a huge imagination that takes him on adventure after adventure. While on these imaginary excursions, he appears to have fun but they all end with a jolt (e.g., he ends up in trouble with his parents, he gets a bump on the head that whisks him back to reality). Throughout these episodes, he attacks space aliens, becomes a jungle boy, brings his toys to life for competition, and becomes a firefighter. His adventures always end with a bang of mischievous excitement. Ralph Consentino uses simple shapes for facial expressions to effectively reveal what Fun-Boy is feeling. The illustrations also do an excellent job of telling the story because the simple text does not explain Fun-Boy�s feelings or thoughts while he is on his excursions. The background colors are dark when it is appropriate (e.g., when Fun-Boy attacks the space alien) and lighter when it is suitable (e.g., when he jumps from vine to vine in the jungle). Young readers will appreciate Fun-Boy�s adventures, as he inspires them to use their imaginations to have fun. Reviewer: Julie Williams
School Library Journal
PreS-Gr 2-A mischievous boy with a wild imagination finds that his adventures don't always turn out exactly as he planned. Readers follow Fun-Boy's escapades in 12 brief vignettes, each introduced with a short phrase and presented in 4 comic-strip panels-think of this as a graphic novel for the younger set. In "Reading is a blast," Fun-Boy consults a how-to book and builds a robot that immediately attacks him; the last picture shows him with hair smoldering, reading "How to Care for Baby Bunnies." In another scenario, the child's play fight between two action-figure monsters is interrupted when he spots a spider and gets spooked. The art features simple lines and bold graphic design rendered in muted colors. As in any series of short stories, some adventures are more successful than others. But pre-readers and new readers who are gaining skills in recognizing patterns and sequences will delight in poring over the pictures and noticing the detail that "makes" the joke in each sequence. Readers will laugh with and at the indefatigably imaginative Fun-Boy and his misadventures.-Marge Loch-Wouters, Menasha's Public Library, WI Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
Cosentino offers 12 nearly wordless mishaps, each told in four big sequential cartoon panels rendered in a retro graphic style on double pages. They're all easy to "read." Young Fun-Boy takes his eye off his ice cream cone just long enough to lose it to an attentive dog, for instance. Later, his violent play with plastic monsters comes to an abrupt end when a real spider drops in; he discovers the perils of hitting up the same house repeatedly for treats on Halloween; plays Tarzan a little too vigorously on his bed; and slides down a playground slide on which a passing bird has left a sticky deposit. Newer readers will gleefully add their own dialogue and commentary to these episodes, and though they may laugh at Fun-Boy's mishaps, they'll come away cheering after he plays "The Masked Ranger" to rescue a "damsel" from a pair of bullies. A crowd-pleaser, imbued with Calvin & Hobbes-style humor. (Picture book. 5-7)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780670059614
Publisher:
Penguin Young Readers Group
Publication date:
02/02/2006
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
6.50(w) x 11.30(h) x 0.37(d)
Age Range:
2 - 6 Years

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