The Massacre at Sand Creek: Narrative Voices

Overview

In the dawn of November 29, 1864, a Colorado militia unit attacked a peaceful encampment of Cheyennes by Sand Creek in southeast Colorado Territory and murdered almost two hundred men, women, and children. In The Massacre at Sand Creek, Bruce Cutler retells, in a powerful narrative, the events surrounding this atrocity. We hear the voices of the white participants, such as Colonel John Chivington, who planned and led the surprise attack, and Captain Silas Soule, the only officer who refused to attack. We are also...

See more details below
Paperback
$15.03
BN.com price
(Save 11%)$16.95 List Price

Pick Up In Store

Reserve and pick up in 60 minutes at your local store

Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (10) from $3.19   
  • New (5) from $12.00   
  • Used (5) from $3.19   
Sending request ...

Overview

In the dawn of November 29, 1864, a Colorado militia unit attacked a peaceful encampment of Cheyennes by Sand Creek in southeast Colorado Territory and murdered almost two hundred men, women, and children. In The Massacre at Sand Creek, Bruce Cutler retells, in a powerful narrative, the events surrounding this atrocity. We hear the voices of the white participants, such as Colonel John Chivington, who planned and led the surprise attack, and Captain Silas Soule, the only officer who refused to attack. We are also given the voices of the Cheyennes - voices that historical documents do not record - with particular focus on Black Kettle, the chief who trusted the promise of protection he had received from white officers and who waved the white flag of peace even as the attacking army approached.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
In this searing novel, Cutler (The Dark Fire) brings to life an oft-told tale-and a tragic episode in American history. On Nov. 29, 1864, Colorado volunteers under Col. John Chivington, a former Methodist minister who claimed to be part Indian himself, attacked the peaceful Cheyenne village of Chief Black Kettle on Sand Creek. This incident, in which hundreds of Indian men, women and children were killed and mutilated, shocked a nation in the midst of its Civil War and led to Congressional inquiries. Cutler tells of the massacre and its aftermath from multiple perspectives, employing such diverse forms as correspondence, newspaper interviews and obituaries. Both white and Indian accounts are presented, with the latter arranged in poetic format to capture the differences between English and the Cheyenne language. Prominent in the account are the letters of Capt. Silas Soule, who commanded a company of cavalry that considered the engagement ``murder pure and simple'' and refused to engage in the killing. Soule was later murdered for his perceived betrayal in opposing Chivington, who remained unrepentant to the end-and against whom no action was ever taken. Cutler recounts this grim tale expertly and with passion, weaving from bits of daily life the stuff of myth. (May)
Library Journal
The author of numerous books, Cutler was the founder of the creative writing program at Wichita State University. Here he has brought to life the murder of almost 200 Cheyenne men, women, and children at Sand Creek by a Colorado military unit. Sand Creek, located in the southeast Colorado territory, is remembered as an atrocity reminiscent of My Lai. Although the author is faithful to historical facts, he has retold this story through a poetic version of the tragedy. He intersperses the voices of actual white participants: Capt. Silas Soule (who refused to attack), Col. John Chivington, and John Smith with those of the Cheyenne. Although no documents reflect what the Cheyenne did, their voices have been re-created in a lyrical vision by Cutler-a clear strength of the book. The storyteller, Ekomina, states, "The white men make two wars. One to kill us. And one to make sure no one will remember....No beginning, no generation coming. Just killing off the living, killing off the dying. Killing to kill, without the heat of wanting to." Recommended for Native American collections.-Vicki L. Toy Smith, Univ. of Nevada, Reno
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780806129907
  • Publisher: University of Oklahoma Press
  • Publication date: 9/28/1997
  • Series: American Indian Literature Series
  • Pages: 264
  • Sales rank: 955,041
  • Product dimensions: 4.82 (w) x 7.34 (h) x 0.64 (d)

Meet the Author

Bruce Cutler was the founder and director of the Creative Writing Program and the Adele Davis Distinguished Professor of Humanities at Wichita State University until 1987. He now lives in Santa Cruz, California. Among his many books are Dark Fire, The Doctrine of Selective Depravity, and A West Wind Rises.

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)