The Math Book: From Pythagoras to the 57th Dimension, 250 Milestones in the History of Mathematics
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The Math Book: From Pythagoras to the 57th Dimension, 250 Milestones in the History of Mathematics

3.3 30
by Clifford A. Pickover
     
 

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Math's infinite mysteries unfold in this paperback edition of the bestselling TheMath Book. Beginning millions of years ago with ancient “ant odometers” and moving through time to our modern-day quest for new dimensions, prolific polymath Clifford Pickover covers 250 milestones in mathematical history. Among the numerous concepts readers

Overview

Math's infinite mysteries unfold in this paperback edition of the bestselling TheMath Book. Beginning millions of years ago with ancient “ant odometers” and moving through time to our modern-day quest for new dimensions, prolific polymath Clifford Pickover covers 250 milestones in mathematical history. Among the numerous concepts readers will encounter as they dip into this inviting anthology: cicada-generated prime numbers, magic squares, and the butterfly effect. Each topic is presented in a lavishly illustrated spread, including formulas and real-world applications of the theorems.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
Praise for The Math Book and Clifford Pickover:
“Pickover contemplates realms beyond our known reality.”--The New York Times
“I can't imagine anybody whose minds won't be stretched by [Pickover's] books.”--Arthur C. Clarke
"Bucky Fuller thought big, Arthur C. Clarke thinks big, but Cliff Pickover outdoes them both.”--WIRED

 
 

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781402757969
Publisher:
Sterling
Publication date:
09/01/2009
Series:
Sterling Milestones Series
Pages:
528
Sales rank:
622,548
Product dimensions:
7.20(w) x 8.50(h) x 1.60(d)

Related Subjects

Meet the Author

Internationally renowned author Clifford Pickover has published more than 40 books, translated into over a dozen languages, on such topics as computers and creativity, art, mathematics, black holes, human intelligence, time travel, alien life, religion, and the history of science. He is an associate editor for several journals, a puzzle contributor to magazines, and the author of over 200 articles on various subjects. Dr. Pickover received his PhD from Yale University's Department of Molecular Biophysics and Biochemistry, having graduated first in his class from Franklin and Marshall College. Today, he holds over 70 U.S. patents for inventions dealing with computing technologies and interfaces. His website, pickover.com, has received millions of visits.

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The Math Book: From Pythagoras to the 57th Dimension, 250 Milestones in the History of Mathematics 3.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 30 reviews.
PaulMoskowitz More than 1 year ago
In his previous science book, "Archimedes to Hawking", Cliff Pickover explored the great laws of science and the lives of the physicists and chemists who discovered the laws. In the "Math Book", Pickover takes on the great moments or milestones of mathematics. While the great laws of physics were almost all named by the early twentieth century, scientific milestones continue to be established. Thus, the mathematical milestones of the "Math Book" are documented into the twenty-first century. The publishers have provided Pickover with a challenging format. Each milestone is described on just one page, and each is accompanied by a full page image on the facing page. These limitations restrict the scope of the presentation for each subject. However, having as many as 250 milestones has allowed Pickover to expand some subject areas into more than one related milestone. The images are absolutely beautiful. They include paintings, diagrams, photos, and computer-generated art. Among the best are a close-up photo of the game of Go, a map of the Internet as the illustration for the Konigsberg Bridges, the Gray Code using a diagram taken from a US patent, and the Archimedes Spiral as exemplified by a fiddlehead fern. Many of the milestones cover esoteric theoretical areas of mathematical analysis. This was not my best subject in school. However, because of the latitude provided by having 250 topics to cover, Pickover is able to include more technology-related topics. He has authored many math books, for example, "Wonders of Numbers", "A Passion for Mathematics", "The Mobius Strip", and this year, an updated paperback addition of "The Loom of God." However, he is also a down-to-earth scientist. The topics in this book include such concrete subjects as the bed sheet folding problem, public key cryptography, Rubik's Cube, and my favorite, cicada-generated prime numbers. Not all milestones were charted by humans! Is every possible milestone included? Even with 250 topics, and yes there are exactly 250, Pickover invites the submission of additional milestones. Before reading the book, I had some expectations of what topics should be covered in the milestones. Upon reading, I found that almost all of my ideas were included. However, I do have a suggestion for an additional milestone, Legendre Polynomials. These polynomials, well-known to physicists, are used to express the form of atomic wave functions. Thus, they underlie the very fabric of matter. If you can include Bessel Functions, why not have Legendre Polynomials? There must be other milestones to suggest. Perhaps the "Math Book" can become an example of Hilbert's Grand Hotel. Even when the hotel is full, there is always room for another guest.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
A good review and mind awakener.
PhoenixGreen More than 1 year ago
"The Math Book" by Clifford Pickover is a wonderful introduction to the major events which have shaped modern mathematical understanding. It does not do the best job at providing a scope into the future, but the past event analysis is phenomenal. the sections which relate events and theories is very helpful in the comprehension of the material.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
this book is very short in the explication about the subject has excelent photos and comments
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just_gene More than 1 year ago
The Math Book From Pythagoras to the 57th Dimension, 250 Milestones in the History of Mathematics Clifford A. Pickover gave us a mouthful of a title. So I say simply... THE MATH BOOK... A SIMPLE HISTORY OF MATH CONCEPTS. Toss in the giants that saw the light and you have major ideas simply explained. Math is not a mystery... it is really a way of describing the world around us. The Math Book is a good intro for further investigation for minds young and old. So give it to the young to open up the ideas and concepts of the real world... Read it to your kids and grand kids for discussions. Let me know what you think...
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The_Hat_Lady More than 1 year ago
This is a great overview of mathematics, written as single page essays, rather than theoretical, numerical jargon. This author takes what he believes to be the most significant people or thoughts about mathematics and explains their significance in layman's terms. Each essay is accompanied by an illustration, photo, or graphic to illustrate the concept or the person who came up with it. Some of the graphic representations are fantastic, and deserve a book of their own. The book is organized by time, with cross-references to other mathemeticians or theories. It left me wanting to research some topics I hadn't considered in the past.
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