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The Medical Casebook of Adolf Hitler: His Illnesses, Doctors and Drugs
     

The Medical Casebook of Adolf Hitler: His Illnesses, Doctors and Drugs

by Leonard L. Heston, Renate Heston
 

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The Medical Casebook of Adolf Hitler illuminates the darkest and most baffling aspects of Hitler's behavior. Militarily and domestically, he ruled with a rigidity that defied reason. Toward the end of the war Hitler's closest companions watched as he succumbed to ever-increasing episodes of indecision, irritability, paranoia, and delusion. Leonard and Renate Heston

Overview

The Medical Casebook of Adolf Hitler illuminates the darkest and most baffling aspects of Hitler's behavior. Militarily and domestically, he ruled with a rigidity that defied reason. Toward the end of the war Hitler's closest companions watched as he succumbed to ever-increasing episodes of indecision, irritability, paranoia, and delusion. Leonard and Renate Heston's study reveals a man who required almost constant attention for a variety of ailments. Hitler's main physician, Dr. Theo Morell, supplied daily injections of an unspecified and untested mixture of vitamins, hormones, and amphetamines. While Hitler praised the restorative powers of these chemicals, his contemporaries described a man beset by illness, addiction, and stress.

Editorial Reviews

The New York Review Of Books
[Filled with] fresh evidence [that] throws new light on Hitler's performance....Impressive.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780815410669
Publisher:
Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, Inc.
Publication date:
01/28/2000
Pages:
192
Product dimensions:
6.10(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.43(d)

Read an Excerpt

Starting in the early 1930s, Adolf Hitler began experiencing episodes of sharp, cramping pain in his right upper abdomen. The pain appeared shortly after meals, and when it did, Hitler would usually leave the room. Sometimes he returned 'after the spasm had passed', as Albert Speer described it, and sometimes he did not return at all. 'After every meal the pain begins!'

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Albert Speer
Nothing so much as my own descriptions from that period convinced me that Professor Heston and his wife have come to the correct conclusion.

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