The Medical Interview: Clinical Care, Education, and Research

Overview

The medical interview is a core clinical skill. It is the medium of doctor-patient communication and relationship, the most important single source of diagnostic data, and the means through which the physician elicits the patient's cooperation in the processes of care. This book draws together a wealth of research and scholarship concerning the medical interview and structures the large domain of knowledge addressing the medical interview and related skills.
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Paperback (Softcover reprint of the original 1st ed. 1995)
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Overview

The medical interview is a core clinical skill. It is the medium of doctor-patient communication and relationship, the most important single source of diagnostic data, and the means through which the physician elicits the patient's cooperation in the processes of care. This book draws together a wealth of research and scholarship concerning the medical interview and structures the large domain of knowledge addressing the medical interview and related skills.
The book begins with general aspects of the interview, then focuses on specific situations and types of interviews, and finally, covers ethics, teaching, evaluation, research, and resources.

The book contains no figures.

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Editorial Reviews

Isaac Kleinman
This book is the first of a planned series in primary care aimed at teachers of primary medicine. The preface suggests the whole series will be strongly weighted to psychosocial issues. This first volume is a compendium attempting to cover, and to some extent codify, the entire field. It covers theory, structure, effects of the interview, interviewing techniques, special interview situations, ethics, interview teaching, and research on the medical interview. The aim is to "coalesce the finding of the 1970s through the early 1990s into readable segments" to the end of encouraging research, education, and faculty development in medical interviewing. Although aimed at a fairly broad audience, the book will mainly be of interest to specialists in the field of the interview itself and perhaps to psychologists and counselors. The first section is really an annotated guide to the literature of the past 20 years with the references incorporated into the text at the rate of about one to three references per paragraph--a technique that adversely affects readability. The interview process described, while instructive, is so elaborate and involved that it would be impractical in day-to-day use in a busy office. Those chapters that are how-to chapters (The Sexual History, The Geriatric Interview) are likely to be the most useful to the practicing physician. Some of the chapters devoted to specific interviewing situations, especially those on cultural factors, are quite good. Useful examples of bad interviewing technique are scattered through the text as well as good advice on how to make contact with the patient, guide and interpret the interview, and avoid pitfalls. But more particularly,specialists in the medical interview, its development and assessment, will find much information has been collected here for them.
Doody's Review Service
Reviewer: Isaac Kleinman, MD (Baylor College of Medicine)
Description: This book is the first of a planned series in primary care aimed at teachers of primary medicine. The preface suggests the whole series will be strongly weighted to psychosocial issues. This first volume is a compendium attempting to cover, and to some extent codify, the entire field. It covers theory, structure, effects of the interview, interviewing techniques, special interview situations, ethics, interview teaching, and research on the medical interview.
Purpose: The aim is to "coalesce the finding of the 1970s through the early 1990s into readable segments" to the end of encouraging research, education, and faculty development in medical interviewing.
Audience: Although aimed at a fairly broad audience, the book will mainly be of interest to specialists in the field of the interview itself and perhaps to psychologists and counselors.
Features: The first section is really an annotated guide to the literature of the past 20 years with the references incorporated into the text at the rate of about one to three references per paragraph—a technique that adversely affects readability. The interview process described, while instructive, is so elaborate and involved that it would be impractical in day-to-day use in a busy office. Those chapters that are how-to chapters (The Sexual History, The Geriatric Interview) are likely to be the most useful to the practicing physician.
Assessment: Some of the chapters devoted to specific interviewing situations, especially those on cultural factors, are quite good. Useful examples of bad interviewing technique are scattered through the text as well as good advice on how to make contact with the patient, guide and interpret the interview, and avoid pitfalls. But more particularly, specialists in the medical interview, its development and assessment, will find much information has been collected here for them.

3 Stars from Doody
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781461275596
  • Publisher: Springer New York
  • Publication date: 7/31/2012
  • Series: Frontiers of Primary Care Series
  • Edition description: Softcover reprint of the original 1st ed. 1995
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 643
  • Product dimensions: 6.00 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 1.34 (d)

Table of Contents

I. A Framework for the Medical Interview.- 1. Three Functions of the Medical Interview.- 2. Hypothesis Testing.- 3. Therapeutic Aspects of the Clinical Encounter.- 4. The Interview as a Clinical Negotiation.- II. The Structure and Process of the Medical Interview.- 5. Performing the Interview.- 6. The Mental Status Examination.- 7. Use and Management of Physicians’ Feelings During the Interview.- 8. Barriers to Effective Communication.- 9. Patient Education in the Medical Encounter: How to Facilitate Learning, Behavior Change, and Coping.- 10. Enhancing Cooperation with the Medical Regimen.- III. The Context of the Interview.- 11. Patients and Their Lives: Psychosocial and Behavioral Aspects.- 12. Cultural Factors in the Medical Interview.- 13. Gender Effects in Physician/Patient Interaction.- 14. The Bilingual Interview and Medical Interpretation.- 15. Conducting a Family Interview.- 16. The Telephone Interview.- 17. Terminating the Doctor/Patient Relationship.- IV. Specific Interview Situations.- 18. Interviewing Pediatric Patients.- 19. The Geriatric Interview.- 20. The Sexual History.- 21. Personality Styles.- 22. Interviewing the Psychotic Patient.- 23. Effective Interviewing and Intervention for Alcohol Problems.- 24. Interviewing the Suicidal Patient.- 25. Caring for Patients with Life-Threatening or Terminal Illness.- 26. Delivering Sad or Bad News.- 27. Bereavement.- V. Values, Ethics, and Legal Issues.- 28. Shame, Humiliation, and Stigma in the Medical Interview.- 29. Medical Ethics and Doctor/Patient Communication.- 30. The Role of the Medical Interview in the Physician’s Search for Meaning.- VI. Teaching and Faculty Development.- 31. Educational Theory and Teaching Medical Interviewing.- 32. A Developmental Awareness for Teaching Doctor/Patient Communication Skills.- 33. Standardized (Simulated) Patients and the Medical Interview.- 34. Teaching with Role-Play: A Structured Approach.- 35. Teaching Interviewing Using Direct Observation and Discussion of Actual Interviews.- 36. Teaching Medical Interviewing: The Lipkin Model.- 37. Evaluating a Faculty Development Course on Medical Interviewing.- VII. Evaluation of the Interview.- 38. Evaluation of Medical Interviewing: Concepts and Principles.- 39. Evaluation Instruments for Medical Interviewing Skills.- VIII. Research on the Medical Interview.- 40. An Overview of Research on Medical Interviewing.- 41. A Guide to the Research Literature on Doctor/Patient Communication.- 42. Coding Categories for Investigating Medical Interviews: A MetaClassification.- 43. Affective and Nonverbal Aspects of the Medical Visit.- 44. Psychological Research on Diagnostic Reasoning.- 45. Accuracy of the Medical History: A Review of Current Concepts and Research.- 46. Patient Recall and Comprehension After the Medical Visit.- 47. The Patient-Centered Interview: Research Support.- 48. Patients’ Assessments of Quality.- Appendices.- A. Instructional Use of Audio and Video Recording John Femino and Catherine Dubé.- B. Bibliography.

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