The Medieval Household in Christian Europe, c. 850-c. 1550: Managing Power, Wealth, and the Body

Overview

This volume asks whether there was a common structure, ideology, and image of the household in the medieval Christian West. In the period under examination, noble households often exercised great power in their own right, while even quite humble households were defined as agents of government in the administration of local communities. Many of the papers therefore address the public functions and perceptions of the household, and argue that the formulation of domestic (and family) values was of essential ...
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Overview

This volume asks whether there was a common structure, ideology, and image of the household in the medieval Christian West. In the period under examination, noble households often exercised great power in their own right, while even quite humble households were defined as agents of government in the administration of local communities. Many of the papers therefore address the public functions and perceptions of the household, and argue that the formulation of domestic (and family) values was of essential importance in the growth and development of the medieval Christian state. Contributors to this volume of collected essays write from a number of disciplinary perspectives (archaeological, art-historical, historical, and literary). They examine socially diverse households (from peasants to kings) and use case-studies from different regions across Europe in different periods from the medieval epoch from c.850 to c.1550. The volume both includes studies from archives and collections not often covered in English-language publications, and offers new approaches to more familiar material.It is divided into thematic sections exploring the role of households in the exercise of power, in controlling the body, in the distribution of wealth and within a wider economy of possessions. The majority of the papers were first given at the International Medieval Congress at the University of Leeds in 2001, in a strand on 'Domus and Familia' organised by the Urban Household Group of the Centre for Medieval Studies, University of York.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9782503522081
  • Publisher: Brepols Publishers
  • Publication date: 9/28/2003
  • Series: International Medieval Research Series , #12
  • Pages: 486
  • Product dimensions: 6.20 (w) x 9.70 (h) x 1.40 (d)

Table of Contents

List of contributors
Foreword
List of abbreviations
Introduction : locating the household : public, private, and the social construction of gender and space 1
Noble family clans and their urban distribution in medieval Trogir 19
Chiesa, famiglia e corte : espressioni materiali della cultura politica longobarda 35
Formation of identity and appearance of North Italian signoral families in the fourteenth century 53
Household practice and royal programme in the high medieval realms of Aragon 79
Household narratives and Lancastrian poetics in Hoccleve's envoys and other early-fifteenth-century middle English poems 91
'Al myn array is bliew, what nedeth more?' : gender and the household in The assembly of ladies 107
'Had the hous, for it is myne' : royal and self-reform in older Scots literature from King Hart (c.1500) to Lyndsay's Ane satyre of the thrie estaitis (c.1552) 137
The rule of youth and the rule of the Familia in Henry Medwall's Nature 155
Household chores in The doctrine of the hert : affective spirituality and subjectivity 167
Gendered household spaces in Christine de Pizan's Livre des trois vertus 187
Governing bodies : law courts, male householders, and single women in late medieval England 199
Credit and the peasant household economy in England before the Black Death : evidence from a Cambridgeshire manor 231
Women and work in the household economy : the social and linguistic evidence from Porto, c. 1340-1450 249
Les dynamiques familiales et sociales dans un village de pecheurs des environs de Porto (1449-1497) 271
The Rules of Robert Grosseteste reconsidered : the lady as estate and household manager in thirteenth-century England 293
The house of the Rufolos in Ravello : lay patronage and diversification of domestic space in southern Italy 315
The palazzo of the da Varano family in Camerino (fourteenth-sixteenth centuries) : typology and evolution of a central Italian aristocratic residence 335
Urban vernacular housing in medieval northern Portugal and the usefulness of typologies 359
Some differences in the cultural production of household consumption in three north Kent communities, c. 1450-1550 391
Houses, shops, and storage : building evidence from two Kentish ports 409
Household objects and domestic ties 433
The medieval peasant at home : England, 1250-1550 449
The peasant Domus and material culture in northern Castile in the later middle ages 469
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