The Melodic Method In School Music

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Excerpt from book:
CHAPTER IV THE ELEMENTS OF THE MUSIC COURSE The Aim of Study. Viewing the subject in one light, we might say that the purpose of the school music course is realized when we initiate the child into the highest and fullest ...
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Overview

Purchase of this book includes free trial access to www.million-books.com where you can read more than a million books for free.
This is an OCR edition with typos.
Excerpt from book:
CHAPTER IV THE ELEMENTS OF THE MUSIC COURSE The Aim of Study. Viewing the subject in one light, we might say that the purpose of the school music course is realized when we initiate the child into the highest and fullest appreciation of good music. If we include under the head of appreciation every kind of higher pleasure and beneficial inner activity obtained through the enjoyment of art music, the statement is indeed true. It is in fact merely another way of formulating the definition of music's purpose given in our first chapter. We know that appreciation can be taught in some degree by having people listen regularly to good music. Why cannot this plan be followed in the schools? Why not have concerts for the entire school once or twice a week, and dispense entirely with sight reading and class singing? The Value of Kirwesthetic Impressions. There is a very good reason why such a course as this wouldnot be effective. What we have to accomplish is nothing less than the initiation of the child into the artistic life embodied in music. To do this, we must make a profound and lasting impression on his emotional nature. The time at our disposal is limited, and we must use it to the best advantage. A general rule of pedagogics applies here: — The quickest and at the same time the most lasting impression is made on a child when he is allowed to enter actively into the doing of things. He does, of course, receive some impression from seeing a thing done. But when he does it himself the result is a hundredfold more effective. This applies with special force to music. What are known as kinsesthetic impressions are of the utmost value here. In order to obtain the desired educative results from music, the child's nature demands that he himself shall take part in the performance...
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780559678387
  • Publisher: BiblioBazaar
  • Publication date: 12/9/2008
  • Pages: 188
  • Product dimensions: 8.00 (w) x 5.00 (h) x 0.40 (d)

Read an Excerpt


CHAPTER IV THE ELEMENTS OF THE MUSIC COURSE The Aim of Study. Viewing the subject in one light, we might say that the purpose of the school music course is realized when we initiate the child into the highest and fullest appreciation of good music. If we include under the head of appreciation every kind of higher pleasure and beneficial inner activity obtained through the enjoyment of art music, the statement is indeed true. It is in fact merely another way of formulating the definition of music's purpose given in our first chapter. We know that appreciation can be taught in some degree by having people listen regularly to good music. Why cannot this plan be followed in the schools? Why not have concerts for the entire school once or twice a week, and dispense entirely with sight reading and class singing? The Value of Kirwesthetic Impressions. There is a very good reason why such a course as this wouldnot be effective. What we have to accomplish is nothing less than the initiation of the child into the artistic life embodied in music. To do this, we must make a profound and lasting impression on his emotional nature. The time at our disposal is limited, and we must use it to the best advantage. A general rule of pedagogics applies here: The quickest and at the same time the most lasting impression is made on a child when he is allowed to enter actively into the doing of things. He does, of course, receive some impression from seeing a thing done. But when he does it himself the result is a hundredfold more effective. This applies with special force to music. What are known as kinsesthetic impressions are of the utmost value here. In order to obtain the desired educativeresults from music, the child's nature demands that he himself shall take part in the performance...
Read More Show Less

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