The Merlin Prophecy Book Two: Death of an Empire
  • The Merlin Prophecy Book Two: Death of an Empire
  • The Merlin Prophecy Book Two: Death of an Empire
  • The Merlin Prophecy Book Two: Death of an Empire
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The Merlin Prophecy Book Two: Death of an Empire

by M. K. Hume
     
 

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DEATH OF AN EMPIRE— THE LEGEND OF MERLIN CONTINUES

Merlin is the product of a brutal rape. Determined to uncover his father’s identity, he sets sail from Celtic Britain with his band of loyal companions. Their journey through war-ravaged France, Rome, and Ravenna to Constantinople will push their strength to the limit and shape Merlin’s

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Overview

DEATH OF AN EMPIRE— THE LEGEND OF MERLIN CONTINUES

Merlin is the product of a brutal rape. Determined to uncover his father’s identity, he sets sail from Celtic Britain with his band of loyal companions. Their journey through war-ravaged France, Rome, and Ravenna to Constantinople will push their strength to the limit and shape Merlin’s reputation as a great healer.

The Roman Empire is under attack. Bound by an oath to relieve suffering the talented apothecary saves thousands of warriors from total destruction. A bloodier conflict between opposing powers arises, and Merlin must use all his resolve if he wishes to survive the death of an empire. M. K. Hume has won the praise of readers and critics alike with her original take on the beloved and enduring Merlin legend. Her background in Arthurian literature lends historical accuracy to a trilogy wrought with passion, heart, and adventure.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"Merlin’s story, will appeal to those who thrill to Game of Thrones and other tales of intersecting, ever-warring, noble lineages."
Kirkus Reviews
A mannered lecture of a novel borrowing from--and liberally interpreting--the Arthurian Cycle. Readers of Hume's previous books (Battle of Kings, 2013, etc.) have met Myrddion Merlinus, aka Merlin, who has made a name for himself throughout Cymru by thwarting the designs of the very bad High King named Vortigern and avoiding the eager blades of the very bad Saxons. So what's an aspiring sorcerer to do? Myrddion betakes himself, Bilbo Baggins–like, out of the Shire (beg pardon, Segontium) and thence to Dubris and thence to the wine-dark Middle Sea, Cymru being an inhospitable place: "This wind would freeze off a witch's tits," saith one Dark Ages dweeb, in the first of many hoary clichés that the reader will meet on this long road. If things are busily mayhem-beset in Romano-Celtic Britain, off in the Roman lands proper they are more so, and Myrddion and company land themselves right in the middle of a smack down with none other than Attila the Hun. Saith a helpful Roman, "[t]he legionaries, together with Merovech and Childeric, will nullify Attila's force on the center of the plain while Thorismund and King Theodoric control the high ground and engage the Hun forces." Ha, Visigoths! If the reader at this point feels like taking notes on a swarming cast of characters, it will take his (or perhaps her) mind off the studied lack of meaningful action, compounded by the usual tritenesses ("He was a little frightened by how close death had come to him") and anachronisms ("A Roman general called Flavius Aetius has pissed them off by returning their gift to its original donor"). Dry, drab and drowsy. T.H. White it ain't.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781476715148
Publisher:
Atria Books
Publication date:
05/21/2013
Series:
Merlin Prophecy Series
Edition description:
Original
Pages:
498
Sales rank:
641,034
Product dimensions:
5.70(w) x 8.90(h) x 0.90(d)

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Read an Excerpt

Merlin Prophecy Book Two: Death of an Empire

  • AN INAUSPICIOUS MEETING

    For how can man die better than facing fearful odds

    For the ashes of his father and the temples of his gods?

    –DEMOSTHENES, OLYNTHIACS

    In faraway Tintagel, where the fortress clung to a barren rock thrust out into a cold, howling sea, Queen Ygerne stood in her forecourt, wrapped in furs and shivering in the gelid afternoon air. To the west, the obscured sun colored the thin, storm-ravaged clouds with a transparent orange glaze. Light struggled with darkness, like the battle that raged within her spirit. With hands thrust in coarse woollen mittens, she clutched at her flat belly and begged the goddess to be kind. Then, for good measure, she prayed to the Virgin Mary that the immortal mother would intercede with the Christian god and bless her unborn child.

    When Ygerne had become certain of her third pregnancy, she had told her husband, King Gorlois, that this time she was sure that her infant would be a boy. Her heart clearly told her the formless child’s sex, and she already dreamed of him, soft and milky, nestling in her arms. Gorlois had whooped with joy, for although his girls, Morgan and Morgause, were a permanent celebration of the wonder of their union, his masculine pride was stirred by the thought of a son to inherit the kingdom of Cornwall. Gorlois asked so little of Ygerne, and loved her so generously and purely, that the queen was overjoyed that she could give him his heart’s desire. The solstice feasts had been transformed by the fertility and felicity of their shared love.

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