The Messenger: A Philosophical Fairytale

The Messenger: A Philosophical Fairytale

by James Lockhart Perry
     
 
What do Confucius, Nietzsche, Schopenhauer, Descartes, Siddhartha, Hobbes, and Judge Roy Bean have in common? Obviously not much.

But meet Mike Miller, Messenger Extraordinaire, the man with the tightest lips in America. After dropping $40,000 on a philosophy degree and bagging three years worth of groceries, Mike finally found a use for all those seers.

Overview

What do Confucius, Nietzsche, Schopenhauer, Descartes, Siddhartha, Hobbes, and Judge Roy Bean have in common? Obviously not much.

But meet Mike Miller, Messenger Extraordinaire, the man with the tightest lips in America. After dropping $40,000 on a philosophy degree and bagging three years worth of groceries, Mike finally found a use for all those seers. Twenty-eight years ago he let none other than John Gotti, the Teflon Don, set him up in the messenger business. Discretion required Mike to alias his clients after someone.

While you're at it, say hello to Tuesday Miller, Texan beauty queen, TV journalist, and the love of Mike's tight-lipped life. Years ago Tuesday let a dying father talk her into marrying the messenger who refused to deliver Nietzsche's evil news. Everybody loves Tuesday, and yes, Mike means everybody.

You couldn't fit two more disparate souls into a marriage. Tuesday's whole thing in life is talking, Mike's is shutting up. Tuesday longs for children, Mike runs in terror from them. Life's complications might befuddle Mike, but Tuesday lets a clear and clean conscience guide her. The only thing this couple agrees on? They are absolute nuts for each other.

So why do they bicker so much? And why does Tuesday keep a divorce attorney on retainer?

Mike has earned millions traveling the globe in his messenger disguise. Tuesday has earned some of the hottest TV ratings in Los Angeles. Life bumps and grinds along until Confucius pays Mike $15,000 to whisper sweet nothings in his dead wife's ear.

After Mike delivers the message -- seriously! -- Schopenhauer trashes the Millers' beachfront trailer. Confucius ups the ante by $100,000, but then Bean leaps in and tosses the rules of civilized society out the window. Mike and Tuesday hole up with Descartes after a mystery driver runs over Confucius, then Siddhartha weighs in with a ponderous terminal opinion.

In the end the Judge is the villain, but still Mike prevaricates. Tuesday forces the issue and finds herself strapped across the railroad tracks. Just before Hobbes drops his bomb, Mike is finally forced to choose between neutrality and a healthy wife.

Who says philosophy can't be fun? Actually, a lot of people, but then they haven't read this book.

Editorial Reviews

Kirkus Reviews
Gangsters, former beauty queens, bombshell blondes, thugs, thieves, assassins and snitches: they're all in day's work for Mike Miller. In Perry's (Cat Flight from Birdland, 2011, etc.) latest novel, Mike Miller makes decisions on a daily basis that keep him in hot water. He's a smart guy who's sometimes too cynical and sarcastic for his own good, but it's not his fault that he fell in to his line of work. Half a lifetime ago, he just was another Joe Schmoe with a degree in philosophy he never wanted and wasting away at a dead-end job. Then he encountered some famous mobsters and got caught up in the middle of a murder case. However, he managed to keep his mouth shut to the cops. Ever since then, he has made a lucrative career out of being a mouthpiece for anyone who will pay top dollar. Acting as the string between two tin cans isn't as easy as it sounds; sometimes the intended recipient of the message is dead. To cope with his oddball clients, Miller nicknames them after philosophers he admires like Confucius, Schopenhauer, Descartes, Siddhartha and Hobbes. Compounding matters is his gorgeous wife, a television news reporter named Tuesday. Miller loves her deeply and lusts for her insatiably, but they clash constantly. This gives the story the feeling of a familiar film noir but is not in the least clichéd. Miller is an anti-hero who readers will find themselves rooting for. Perry is painstaking with his word play and attention to detail given not only to Miller, but every character and setting. The the plot feels wonderfully precise, and this extends from Perry's clever nom-de-plume to the use of the infinity symbol on every page. An absorbing read for lovers of great writing, the philosophically minded and appreciators of slick dramas.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781468002324
Publisher:
CreateSpace Publishing
Publication date:
11/28/2011
Pages:
266
Product dimensions:
5.25(w) x 8.00(h) x 0.56(d)

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