The Metabolic Clock Cookbook: Recipes to Speed Up Your Metabolism

The Metabolic Clock Cookbook: Recipes to Speed Up Your Metabolism

by Julie Rennie
     
 

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Discover what to eat, and when, to speed up your metabolism and lose weight easily with this cookbook companion to The Metabolic Clock

Using the core principles of the successful The Metabolic Clock healthy life plan, this book is filled with recipes that are designed to speed up your metabolism and improve your health. This is an

Overview

Discover what to eat, and when, to speed up your metabolism and lose weight easily with this cookbook companion to The Metabolic Clock

Using the core principles of the successful The Metabolic Clock healthy life plan, this book is filled with recipes that are designed to speed up your metabolism and improve your health. This is an inspiring cookbook filled with nourishing and delicious meals covering breakfast, mid-morning fruit, lunch, dinner, snacks, and treats. Keeping healthy and vital is made easy with the simple and nutritious recipes that are family friendly and for those who want to improve their health and energy levels. You owe it to yourself to nourish your body and gain the energy to live life to the fullest. Living the metabolic clock lifestyle is easy, these recipes are healthy and delicious and more fun than a diet. Includes dual measurements.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781921295676
Publisher:
Rockpool Publishing
Publication date:
09/28/2014
Pages:
176
Product dimensions:
7.40(w) x 9.60(h) x 0.50(d)

Read an Excerpt

The Metabolic Clock Cookbook

Recipes to Speed Up your Metabolism


By Julie Rennie, Jody Lee, Megan Drinan, Brent Parker-Jones

Rockpool Publishing

Copyright © 2013 Julie Rennie
All rights reserved.
ISBN: 978-1-925017-01-4



CHAPTER 1

Kitchen helpers


These simple recipes help you to add flavour and variety to meals. They do not take long to make and can be shared across many meals. They help you to make a meal tasty and delicious in very little time. I like to make a few on shopping day.

• Rosemary flavour bag

• Favourite spice mix

• Sprouted seeds

• Sweet chilli sauce

• Mustard and orange salad dressing

• Lemon mayonnaise

• Roasted garlic bulbs

• Spelt chapatti

• Roasted pumpkin, two ways

• Yoghurt cheese balls

• Ratatouille

• Four easy salads

• Homemade yoghurt

• Preserved lemons

• Basic roast chicken

• Green vegetable medley

• Homemade tomato sauce

• Spelt bread

• Homemade muesli

• Cooked quinoa


Rosemary flavour bag


Rosemary is easy to grow in your garden or in a pot. It adds a rich flavour to stews and soups. The leaves can become tough when cooked and not pleasant to eat so that is why I like to tie them in muslin. These flavour pouches can then be placed in your cooking pots and removed at the end of the cooking.

1 sprig fresh rosemary
muslin
cooking string

Cut out 8 cm x 8 cm (3 in x 3 in) squares of muslin. Fill with rosemary stems and tie with string.


Favourite spice mix

Mix together the following spices and place in an airtight jar. Use the mix to flavour soups and stews or as a rub on meat.

4 tablespoons dried coriander (cilantro)
4 tablespoons ground cumin
2 tablespoons garam masala
2 tablespoons sweet paprika

Sprouted seeds


Sprouted foods are one of the best sources of living enzymes, which increase your metabolism. When a seed is given water and sunlight, elements contained in the seed are quickly converted to provide energy. At this early stage of growth there is a high quality of nutrients that are easy to digest.

Increase your metabolism by adding sprouts to your salads and sandwiches. Alfalfa, buckwheat, radish, red clover, lentil, chickpeas (garbanzo), mung bean and sunflower seeds are the most common sprouts. Purchase organic seeds for a healthier sprout.

1 tablespoon mixed red clover, radish and alfalfa seeds
1 glass jar
1 piece muslin
1 rubber band

Place seeds in jar. Fill the jar to half way with cold water. Place the muslin over the rim of the jar and fix in place with a rubber band. Tip the jar upside down over a sink to drain the water. This washes the seeds. Refill the jar half way up with water.

Place on a windowsill or a light-filled part of your kitchen. Leave to soak for 24 hours. The water and light will kickstart your seeds into life. After 24 hours, tip the jar upside down over the sink and drain out the water.

Refill with water and drain all water out twice a day for 4 to 6 days.

When seeds begin to throw off their hulls, fill the jar with water and remove the muslin cover. Tip out just enough water to take out the hulls that are floating on the surface. Place the muslin on the jar and fix in place with the rubber band. Drain again. Lay the jar horizontally so there is more surface area for sprouts to grow.

The sprouts are ready to eat in 7 days. Store in an airtight container in the refrigerator. They will keep fresh for 3 to 4 days. Start another jar of seeds growing.

Note: Specially designed sprouting jars are available from health food stores.


Sweet chilli sauce

2 garlic cloves, peeled and crushed
6 large red chillies
½ teaspoon fish sauce
1 cup rice vinegar
½ cup water
3 tablespoons raw caster sugar

Grind the garlic and chilli in a mortar and pestle or food processor. Place in a small saucepan over medium heat with all the other ingredients and simmer for 20 minutes or until a little sticky. Cool slightly and place in a sterilised jar (see for instructions). Store in the refrigerator.

Note: For a milder sauce, de-seed 3 of the chillies. The heat is in the seeds.


Mustard and orange salad dressing

1 heaped teaspoon Dijon mustard
½ cup fresh orange juice
¼ cup olive oil
1 teaspoon manuka honey
pinch of Celtic sea salt
cracked black pepper

Place mustard, orange juice, oil and honey in a jar with a tight-fitting lid. Shake to combine then season to taste with Celtic salt and pepper. Store in refrigerator.


Lemon mayonnaise

1 free-range or organic egg, yolk only
½ teaspoon Dijon mustard
2 teaspoons lemon juice
100 ml (3 ½ fl oz) olive oil
½ teaspoon manuka honey
½ teaspoon finely grated lemon zest

Whisk the egg yolk, mustard and lemon juice in a small bowl. Add the oil slowly, a couple of drops at a time while whisking until the mayonnaise thickens. Stir through the honey and lemon zest. Place in a glass jar and store in the refrigerator for up to a week.


Roasted garlic bulbs

Roasted garlic has a sweeter, richer flavour than raw garlic. Boost the flavour of dips, dressings, stews and soups or spread on toasted bread and top with tomato slices.

2 bulbs garlic
olive oil, to drizzle

Peel away the outer skins of the bulbs. Cut the heads off the top of the bulbs to expose each garlic clove. Drizzle with olive oil and place in a muffin tin. Cover with foil and bake. For firmer cloves, bake for 35 minutes. If you like a softer bulb, bake for 45 minutes. When cool, place in an airtight container and store in the refrigerator for up to 2 weeks.


Spelt chapatti

These flat breads are a great accompaniment to a curry or a stew. Use instead of rice.

Makes 4

½ cup white spelt flour
½ cup wholemeal spelt flour
½ teaspoon Celtic sea salt
¼ teaspoon ground cumin
½ cup lukewarm water

Sift the flours together into a medium-sized bowl and add the Celtic salt and cumin. Make a well in the middle and gradually add the water, mixing well with a wooden spoon or using your fingers. Add enough water to form a soft dough. Turn the dough onto a lightly floured surface and knead for about 5 minutes. Wrap in plastic and place in the refrigerator for 15 minutes.

Divide the dough into 4 equal portions. On a lightly floured surface, roll each piece into a circle. Place a heavy based, non-stick frying pan over high heat. When the pan is hot, reduce the heat to medium and dry fry the first chapatti turning over once when the chapatti begins to bubble. If the pan is hot it may only take 1 minute on each side.

Remove the cooked chapatti from the pan and cover with foil to keep warm. Repeat the process until all the breads are cooked. Serve immediately with a meal or allow tocool and store in the freezer in a sealed plastic bag. To re-use once unfrozen, dry fry in a heavy frying pan over high heat.


Roasted pumpkin, two ways

When cooled, the pumpkin can be stored in the refrigerator and used in salads and wraps or reheated to add to a meal. Sweet potato can also be used.


Spiced pumpkin

¼ Jap pumpkin, peeled and cut into 3 cm (1 in) pieces
1 tablespoon olive oil
½ teaspoon Favourite Spice Mix

Preheat oven to 180°C (350°F). Place ingredients in a plastic bag and seal. Shake to coat the pumpkin with the oil and Favourite Spice Mix. Tip out onto an oven tray lined with baking paper. Bake until soft and golden brown in colour. Test with a skewer.


Asian-inspired roasted pumpkin

¼ Jap pumpkin, peeled and cut into 3 cm (1 in) pieces
1 tablespoon olive oil
1 tablespoon tamari
½ teaspoon Chinese five spice

Preheat oven to 180°C (350°F). Place all ingredients in a plastic bag and seal. Shake to coat the pumpkin with the oil, tamari and Chinese five spice. Tip out onto an oven tray lined with baking paper. Bake until soft and golden brown in colour. Test with a skewer.

Note: You can leave the skin on or off the pumpkin, depending on your preference.


Yoghurt cheese balls

Yoghurt cheese is delicious marinated with lemon-flavoured oil and served with a salad or on top of steamed vegetables. It can also be used in lunch wraps instead of mayonnaise.

1 piece of muslin 30 cm (12 in) square
500 g (1.1 lb) Greek yoghurt
1 teaspoon Celtic sea salt
cooking string
1 teaspoon cracked black pepper
3 sprigs thyme
1 bay leaf
1 slice fresh lemon cut into 4
½ cup olive oil
½ cup lemon-flavoured olive oil
sterilised jar (see for instructions).

Sterilise the muslin by steeping it in boiling water. Drain and lay over a large plate. Mix the yoghurt with the salt and tip it on the muslin. Bring up the sides of the muslin and tie firmly with the string. Tie the muslin over a wooden spoon and rest the spoon over a saucepan so that the muslin bag is suspended. The saucepan will catch the whey as it drips off. If the weather is warm, place the saucepan in the refrigerator. Leave for 2 to 3 days until the yoghurt stops dripping. After three days the whey will be in the saucepan and a soft cheese will be in the muslin.

Store the whey in a jar in the refrigerator. Take teaspoons of the cheese and roll into balls with your hands. Lower gently into the sterilised jar and sprinkle with the cracked pepper. Place the thyme, bay leaf and lemon slices in the jar. Mix the two oils together and pour into the jar until the cheese is covered. Seal with the lid and store in the refrigerator. Allow 2 days for the Yoghurt Cheese Balls to marinate before using them. They will keep for up to two weeks in the refrigerator.

Note: Don't throw the whey out. Whey is a good source of minerals and digestive bacteria. It can be added to soups and stews to aid digestion. When used in marinades, it softens meat. You can also use it when baking bread.


Ratatouille

Ratatouille is really versatile and can be served hot or cold. It is really easy to make and can be stored for several days in the refrigerator.

4 serves

1 teaspoon olive oil
1 small Spanish onion, finely chopped
2 garlic cloves, finely chopped
1 red capsicum (pepper), cut into 1 cm (½ in) dice
1 green capsicum (pepper), cut into 1 cm (½ in) dice
2 large ripe tomatoes, cut into 1 cm (½ in) dice
1 small oriental eggplant (aubergine), cut into 1 cm (½ in) dice
1 small zucchini (courgette), cut into 1 cm (½ in) dice
pinch of Celtic sea salt
½ teaspoon Favourite Spice Mix or thyme sprig
1 teaspoon tomato paste
2 tablespoons white wine
sprig of thyme or a Rosemary Flavour Bag

Place a deep-sided frying pan or wok over medium heat. Add oil and sauté the onions and garlic for 2 minutes. Add the capsicum (pepper) and cook for another 2 minutes. Add tomatoes, eggplant (aubergine), zucchini (courgette), Celtic salt, spice mix, tomato paste, wine and flavour bag or thyme sprig. Reduce heat and cook gently for 15 minutes. Remove flavour bag or thyme sprig.

Note: Ratatouille can be served on French toast, with frittata, grilled fish, chicken or lamb. Other recipes in this book that include Ratatouille are Pan-seared Greek Cheese and Ratatouille Cottage Pie.


Four easy salads

These salads are easy to make and can be added to any meal.


Fresh and crisp salad

1 serve

1 handful of mixed salad leaves, washed and dried
4 mint leaves, thinly sliced (preferably Vietnamese mint)
6 thin slices cucumber, cut on the diagonal
6 thin slices celery, cut on the diagonal
1 tablespoon Mustard and Orange Salad Dressing

Place all salad ingredients in a small bowl and toss together with the salad dressing. Serve immediately.


Pear and walnut salad

1 serve

½ a pear, cored and sliced
1 handful of mixed watercress and rocket leaves (arugula), washed and dried
1 tablespoon walnuts, roughly chopped
half an orange, for squeezing
olive oil, to drizzle
pinch of Celtic sea salt
cracked black pepper
1 tablespoon parmesan shavings

Place pear slices, watercress, rocket leaves and walnuts in a bowl. Squeeze orange juice on top and toss to mix. Drizzle with olive oil and season with Celtic salt and pepper. Serve immediately topped with the shaved parmesan.


Roasted beetroot (beet) salad

1 serve

1 handful of baby spinach leaves, washed and dried
½ roasted beetroot (beet), diced into 3 cm (1 in) cubes
1 tablespoon marinated goat's feta or 1 Yoghurt Cheese Ball
1 tablespoon pistachios or chopped walnuts
½ orange, for squeezing
pinch of Celtic sea salt
cracked black pepper

Mix together all ingredients in a small bowl and season with Celtic salt and pepper. Squeeze orange over salad. Serve immediately.

Tuscan salad

1 serve

4 cherry tomatoes, cut in half
4 bocconcini
6 basil leaves, torn
1 tablespoon baby olives (or 6 kalamata)
olive oil, to drizzle

Mix all ingredients in a small bowl and drizzle with the olive oil. Serve immediately.


Homemade yoghurt

The value in making your own yoghurt is that you can choose good quality organic milk. You will require a milk thermometer. It is important to use a sterilised jar (see for instructions).

1 litre (2 pints) organic milk
100 g (3.5 oz) biodynamic yoghurt

Place milk in a heavy based saucepan on the stove and heat to 80°C (175°F). Take off the heat and allow to cool to 50°C (120°F). Add the yoghurt and stir to combine. It's normal for the mixture to be a little bit lumpy.

Transfer to a sterilised, 1-litre (2-pint) jar. Put the lid on. Place the jar in a pan and fill the pan to the rim of the jar with hot water from the tap. The warmth will help to curdle the yoghurt. Leave in a warm part of your kitchen for 10 to 18 hours or until it thickens. Transfer to the refrigerator. The yoghurt will keep in the refrigerator for a few days.

Note: An electric yoghurt maker will make a smoother, thicker yoghurt. These can be purchased from department or electrical stores.


Preserved lemons


5 small lemons
¼ cup Celtic sea salt
1 tablespoon black peppercorns
2 bay leaves or a sprig of thyme
½ cup lemon juice
sterilised glass jar (see for instructions).
olive oil to cover

Cut lemons into quarters. Sprinkle salt over lemons and pack into a sterilised glass jar while layering with the peppercorns and fresh herbs. Press down firmly to squeeze out the juice. Add any remaining salt and the lemon juice.

Seal with the lid and store at room temperature in a cupboard. Turn the jar each day to redistribute the salt and lemon juice. After 7 days, open the jar and top up with olive oil. After 4 weeks the lemons will be softened and ready for use. They will keep for about 6 months.

Note: Preserved lemons are excellent rubbed onto the skin of a chicken before roasting or used in the stuffing. Use them to add flavour to Moroccan dishes, marinades, quinoa salads and casseroles or fish dishes.


Basic roast chicken

Roasting a chicken every week is a great kitchen helper. There are so many quick meals that can be made from roasted chicken like chicken salads, chicken and salad wraps and fillings for rice paper rolls.

1 x size 12 free-range or organic chicken
4 pieces Preserved Lemon
1 onion, peeled and cut into quarters
1 oven bag for baking

Preheat oven to 180°C (350°F). Pat the chicken dry with a paper towel. Rub a preserved lemon quarter over the skin of the chicken and then place all the lemon pieces inside the cavity along with onion. Place chicken in the oven bag and onto a baking tray. Tie the top of the bag and make a couple of holes for the stream to escape.

Bake for 1 hour or until the chicken is cooked. Once chicken is cool, peel the skin off and discard. Leave some large pieces such as the drumsticks and shred the remaining chicken into pieces. Store in an airtight container in the refrigerator for use in other meals.

Green vegetable medley

On shopping day, I like to prepare my favourite vegetables and place them in individual parcels in zip-lock bags. They are easy to steam when you come home from a busy day. Simply flavour with a squeeze of lemon or orange juice, Celtic sea salt and cracked black pepper. Try with a Yoghurt Cheese Ball on top or a small piece of marinated goat's feta. Sprinkle over 2 finely chopped walnut halves or simply sprinkle with chopped parsley or coriander (cilantro).

1 serve

4 pieces broccolini (baby broccoli)
12 green beans
6 slices zucchini (courgette)
6 sugar snap peas
2 small bok choy

Lightly steam the vegetables for 2 to 3 minutes and add your favourite topping.

Homemade tomato sauce

Can be used to flavour soups or stews instead of tinned tomatoes.

1 kilo (2.2 lb) very ripe tomatoes (Roma preferably)
1 tablespoon olive oil
1 large brown onion, roughly chopped
2 large garlic cloves, roughly chopped
½ cup dry white wine
1 tablespoon tomato paste
1 heaped teaspoon Favourite Spice Mix
1 teaspoon Sweet Chilli Sauce
1 Rosemary Flavour Bag
2 cups water
½ teaspoon Celtic sea salt
cracked black pepper

Place a large saucepan of water on the stove and bring to the boil. Drop the tomatoes into the water a few at a time to blanch the skins. This only takes a couple of minutes. Remove with a slotted spoon, peel the skin off and cut out the core.

In another large pan, heat the olive oil and sauté the onions and garlic for 1 minute, being careful not to brown them. Add the wine, tomato paste, spice mix, chilli sauce, flavour bag, water and tomatoes. Season with Celtic salt and cracked pepper.

Bring to a simmer and cook uncovered for 40 minutes. Set aside to cool. Remove flavour bag and blend the tomato mixture in batches in a food processor or blender. Blend for a few seconds for a more chunky sauce or longer if you prefer a smoother sauce.

Note: Roasted Garlic can be used for a richer flavour. Sauce can be stored in small plastic containers in the freezer.


(Continues...)

Excerpted from The Metabolic Clock Cookbook by Julie Rennie, Jody Lee, Megan Drinan, Brent Parker-Jones. Copyright © 2013 Julie Rennie. Excerpted by permission of Rockpool Publishing.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

Meet the Author


Julie Rennie is an inspirational speaker with a background in elite sport and 10 years in the personal growth industry. She is the author of The Metabolic Clock.

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