The Mexican Revolution: Conflict and Consolidation, 1910-1940

Overview

In 1910 insurgent leaders crushed the Porfirian dictatorship, but in the years that followed fought among themselves, until a nationalist consensus produced the 1917 Constitution. This in turn provided the basis for a reform agenda that transformed Mexico in the modern era. The civil war and the reforms that followed receive new and insightful attention in this book.

These essays, the result of the 45th annual Walter Prescott Webb Memorial Lectures, presented by the University ...

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The Mexican Revolution: Conflict and Consolidation, 1910-1940

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Overview

In 1910 insurgent leaders crushed the Porfirian dictatorship, but in the years that followed fought among themselves, until a nationalist consensus produced the 1917 Constitution. This in turn provided the basis for a reform agenda that transformed Mexico in the modern era. The civil war and the reforms that followed receive new and insightful attention in this book.

These essays, the result of the 45th annual Walter Prescott Webb Memorial Lectures, presented by the University of Texas at Arlington in March 2010, commemorate the centennial of the outbreak of the revolution.

A potent mix of factors—including the concentration of wealth in the hands of a few thousand hacienda owners, rancheros, and foreign capitalists; the ideological conflict between the Diaz government and the dissident regional reformers; and the grinding poverty afflicting the majority of the nation’s eleven million industrial and rural laborers—provided the volatile fuel that produced the first major political and social revolution of the twentieth century. The conflagration soon swept across the Rio Grande; indeed, The Mexican Revolution shows clearly that the struggle in Mexico had tremendous implications for the American Southwest. During the years of revolution, hundreds of thousands of Mexican citizens crossed the border into the United States. As a result, the region experienced waves of ethnically motivated violence, economic tensions, and the mass expulsions of Mexicans and US citizens of Mexican descent.

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Editorial Reviews

Doctor - Samuel Brunk
“Plainly written and full of interesting detail, this book, produced in commemoration of the centennial of the Mexican Revolution, distills a great deal of valuable scholarship. It is especially strong on the borderlands region and Mexican-U.S. relations, but it has something for everyone interested in the revolutionary process, from the origins of the conflict through the trials of institutionalization.” – Samuel Brunk, Professor of History at the University of Texas, El Paso and author of The Posthumous Career of Emiliano Zapata: Myth, Memory, and Mexico’s Twentieth Century
Doctor - Andrew Grant Wood
“Paying special attention to the northern borderlands perspective, The Mexican Revolution keenly interrogates Greater Mexican society at a time of formidable change. Richmond and Haynes have assembled a sterling collection.”—Dr. Andrew Grant Wood, Rutland Professor of American History at the University of Tulsa
Dr. Samuel Brunk

“Plainly written and full of interesting detail, this book, produced in commemoration of the centennial of the Mexican Revolution, distills a great deal of valuable scholarship. It is especially strong on the borderlands region and Mexican-US relations, but it has something for everyone interested in the revolutionary process, from the origins of the conflict through the trials of institutionalization.”–Samuel Brunk, Professor of History, University of Texas--El Paso, and author, The Posthumous Career of Emiliano Zapata: Myth, Memory, and Mexico’s Twentieth Century
Dr. Andrew Grant Wood

“Paying special attention to the northern borderlands perspective, The Mexican Revolution keenly interrogates Greater Mexican society at a time of formidable change. Richmond and Haynes have assembled a sterling collection.”—Andrew Grant Wood, Rutland Professor of American History, University of Tulsa
Choice Magazine - J. B. Kirkwood

" [The Mexican Revolution] is highly recommended. The breadth of issues will appeal to graduate students and professionals" -- J. B. Kirkwood, Colby-Sawyer College
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Product Details

Meet the Author


DOUGLAS W. RICHMOND is professor emeritus in history at the University of Texas at Arlington. He received his PhD from the University of Washington.
SAM W. HAYNES is a professor of history and director of the Center for Greater Southwestern Studies at the University of Texas at Arlington. His PhD is from the University of Houston.
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