The Middle East

The Middle East

3.5 18
by Bernard Lewis
     
 

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In a sweeping and vivid survey, renowned historian Bernard Lewis charts the history of the Middle East over the last 2,000 years, from the birth of Christianity through the modern era, focusing on the successive transformations that have shaped it. Elegantly sritten, scholarly yet accessible, The Middle East is the most comprehensive single volume history

Overview


In a sweeping and vivid survey, renowned historian Bernard Lewis charts the history of the Middle East over the last 2,000 years, from the birth of Christianity through the modern era, focusing on the successive transformations that have shaped it. Elegantly sritten, scholarly yet accessible, The Middle East is the most comprehensive single volume history of the region ever written from the world's foremost authority on the Middle East.

Editorial Reviews

Library Journal
A noted Middle East historian, Lewis (Islam and the West, LJ 5/1/93) has written a 2000-year history of a region stretching from Libya to Central Asia. He concludes with the effects of the Gulf War and the entry into negotiations of the PLO and the government of Israel. Beginning his history before the rise of Christianity and Islam, Lewis seeks to illuminate the connections between the ancient Middle East and the modern region. He outlines the histories of pre-Islamic Arabia and the two great empires of Sasanid Persia and Byzantium. These entities formed the backdrop for the rise of the Prophet Muhammed and the formation of the Islamic polity. Lewis concentrates on the cultural, social, and economic changes in the region while keeping the political narrative to a minimum. He includes many direct quotations from a variety of contemporary sources to highlight a given period and place, providing an immediacy of experience not offered by conventional narrative or analysis. Highly recommended.-Robert J. Andrews, Duluth P.L., Minn.
Jay Freeman
For more than 50 years, Lewis has strived mightily and successfully to explain the cultures and histories of Middle Eastern peoples to Western readers. The task of writing a political history of the region has already been fulfilled by him and by many others. In his latest work, Lewis has chosen to accentuate the social, economic, and cultural changes that have occurred over 20 centuries. He ranges from seemingly trivial concerns (changes in dress and manners in an Arab coffeehouse) to earth-shaking events (the Mongol conquest of Mesopotamia) in painting a rich, varied, and fascinating portrait of a region that is steeped in traditionalism while often forced by geography and politics to accept change. As always, Lewis is eloquent, incisive, and displays an intuitive grasp of the social dynamics of the culture he describes. Both scholars and general readers with an interest in the Middle East will find this work a delight.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781439190005
Publisher:
Scribner
Publication date:
12/15/2009
Sold by:
SIMON & SCHUSTER
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
448
Sales rank:
241,117
File size:
9 MB

Meet the Author

Bernard Lewis (born May 31, 1916) was born in London. He is the author of forty-six books on Islam and the Middle East, including Notes on a Century: Reflections of a Middle East Historian; The End of Modern History in the Middle East; and The Crisis of Islam: Holy War and Unholy Terror. He also wrote three major syntheses for general audiences: The Arabs in History; The Middle East and the West; and The Middle East. Lewis is the Cleveland E. Dodge Professor Emeritus at Princeton University.

Brief Biography

Hometown:
Princeton, New Jersey
Date of Birth:
May 31, 1916
Place of Birth:
London, England
Education:
B.A., University of London, 1936; Diplome des Etudes Semitiques, University of Paris, 1937; Ph.D., University of London,

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The Middle East: A Brief History of the Last 2,000 Years 3.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 18 reviews.
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As I first started reading this book, I realized that it was definitely well put together. The research and accuracy is definitely entertaining. However, this book is not for any student looking for a quick lesson on Middle East history. The descriptions and chapters are long and at times cover alot of material that can make you sleepy after a long day. The chapters touch the origins of many empires, religions and modern day issues. This may not be the book for someone wanting to start learning about Mid-East culture from scratch. I have to say this writing does include vocabulary, mainly arabic words. I found this to be helpful in learning a few new words. Overall the book is good if you want accurate information. Just be prepared for alot of information and make sure to have coffee in the house.
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Guest More than 1 year ago
Prof. Lewis begins with the Roman and Persian Empires to lay the foundation for this sweeping history of the Middle East. Given the range of area and the span of time, it can only be but an overview history--but his command of the dates, people, and places which made the history of this area is unparalleled. He is neither an apologist for the Arab peoples, like Edward Said or John Esposito, nor a hasty critic. He is a great historian.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I'm not a noted historian, yet was interested in the world's history both before and after the birth of Christ. History on the mideast was not something I studied. It was a wrestling match to pick apart the Mid East history to 637 CE, but so interesting to learn about Persia, Parthians or Parthinians, Meso-Potamia, and Cyrus and Alexander the Greats. I've yet to read about the rise of Islam given Conquest by Arabia to the advanced organization and adjustment of Islam to do.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This is the best survey of Middle Eastern history now available, by the most distinguished living Orientalist. It should be required reading for anyone who wants to understand the Islamic world.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
for those interested in the subject
Guest More than 1 year ago
Within the orientalists intellectual circle, Benard Lewis is considered a heretical historian within the topics of Islam and the Middle East and because of his educational bias from Israel, he attacks the Arabs and Islam. His dangerous ideology calls for the destruction of Islam by the Western powers. Edward Said, in his book Orientalism points out the idiotic ideas and points by that of Mr Lewis. While some right wing propandists may hold him high in respect, many intellectuals consider him on the other end of great monumentals such as Edward Said and John L. Esposito.