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The Milepost 2014
     

The Milepost 2014

5.0 2
by Kris Valencia (Editor)
 
The MILEPOST® is the "quintessential" travel guide to Alaska and the highways and byways of the North. Since 1949, this "bible of North Country Travel" has offered details on road conditions, ferry travel, lodging, camping, fishing, sightseeing and services in Alaska, Yukon, British Columbia, Alberta and Northwest Territories. Travelers will find trip planning

Overview

The MILEPOST® is the "quintessential" travel guide to Alaska and the highways and byways of the North. Since 1949, this "bible of North Country Travel" has offered details on road conditions, ferry travel, lodging, camping, fishing, sightseeing and services in Alaska, Yukon, British Columbia, Alberta and Northwest Territories. Travelers will find trip planning help and answers to frequently asked questions on such topics as wildlife viewing, crossing the border and traveling with pets.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
Reviewed by: Susan Frissell, Ph.D., Publisher/Editor, www.womenwithwheels.com This may be the biggest book you've ever read. It is also, by far, the most comprehensive and invaluable tome when navigating the Alaska Highway. When traveling throughout Alaska and northwestern Canada, The Milepost, a much-needed Bible since 1949, is the book to have under your arm-or car seat.In its 64th edition, The Milepost is the "essential guide" for Alaska travelers, since 1949. This edition is edited by Kris Valencia, and with nearly 700 color photos and 100 maps to edit, her job is a big one. According to Valencia, "traveling the Alaska Highway is worth the price, and the memories are worth the mileage."This reviewer can attest to that. Taking off on my big adventure in 1972, a friend and I traveled from Chicago, IL to Fairbanks, AK and back. With dozens of stops along the way-and only one flat tire-we drove 28,500 miles in 28 days. At that time, the famous Highway was not all paved; much of it gravel. Now, the Highway is paved, all miles of it, which probably means the trip is a little faster.Covering some 14,000 miles of road, The Milepost lists detailed descriptions of all the communities along the way, a mile-by-mile log of all Northern routes and attractions inboth Alaska and northwestern Canada. When traveling the Alaska Highway, we found the mile-by-mile logs extremely helpful; particularly, when in need of a fuel stop and/or eating establishment. We had our camping sites scheduled ahead of time, which helped, but referred to Milepost time after time when searching for suggestions about where to stop and/or eat. I have kept my original Milepost, which in the 1970s was a considerably smaller version.As I did when traveling in Alaska, The Milepost recommends all travelers carefully plan their itineraries ahead of time. For instance, if you are traveling in a good size RV, you will find there are extended parking areas available most everywhere along the way. Travelers can also combine road travel with the Alaska state ferry system and the Alaska Railroad. We triedbooking the Ferry before we left town and even at that time, there was no more room available. In 2012, I suspect this is more of a problem, due to far more travelers to Alaska.Readers and travelers needn't purchase The Milepost only if they are planning a trip to Alaska. On the contrary, for the armchair traveler alike, The Milepost is just great fun to read and peruse. There is so much contained in this travel planner, it is great reading. You will learn a lot.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781892154316
Publisher:
Milepost
Publication date:
03/01/2014
Edition description:
Other
Pages:
760
Product dimensions:
8.30(w) x 10.80(h) x 1.00(d)

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The Milepost 2014 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book is the only guide you need to travel IN Alaska or TO Alaska. I've used this book since 1999 and get a new edition every year. It is updated every year to reflect what's happening out on the roads. The first 40+ pages are all about things you probably want to know--like what happens when you cross the border, what can you bring with you? And, what's the weather like? What should you pack? What kind of airlines fly there? What kind of hotels are there? How do you find the fish, how do you rent an RV, what shape is the ALCAN in and so much more! The MILEPOST gets its name because it is really a mile-by-mile road log. If there's something on the road, you're going to be able to read about it in advance. Why be a stranger in a strange land when you can feel like a local as you're driving. This has tips for things you just can't miss along the way, where your next gas stop is, what the campground ahead of you has to offer and so on...There are three routes that start in the Lower 48, one in Seattle, one in Ellensburg, WA and the last in Great Falls, MT and each of those helps you pair up with the AlCan highway further north. The roads covered include all of the main highways in Alaska as well as the primary (and most logical routes) across northwestern Canada. It also includes information about taking the ferry to Alaska and that makes a fun option to drive part way and ferry the Inside Passage for another part of your route. I've used the MILEPOST to go north from Florida to Alaska, taken it southbound from Alaska to Minnesota many times, driven south to Vancouver and Oregon and many times to Montana. My favorite route is to take the Central Access Route in July and get in on all the fresh fruit offered in the Okanagan Valley of BC. The campgrounds and beaches along here are spectacular but fill up fast on weekends! Tru's Mama, Anchorage, AK
alittleoh More than 1 year ago
This book was amazing! Every detail was so exact I'm not sure how they do it. We drove from Anchorage to Homer using the Seward Highway and Sterling Highway sections. It was great to know what stops were coming up ahead of time. They detailed if a stop was scenic, no view, camping allowed, what you were going to see. Definitely worth it!