The Mind at Night: The New Science of How and Why We Dream

Overview


Psychologists and philosophers have long grappled with the mysteries of dreaming, and now-thanks largely to recent innovations in brain imaging -neuroscientists are starting to join the conversation. In this groundbreaking book, award-winning journalist Andrea Rock traces the brief but fascinating history of this emerging field. She then takes us into modern sleep labs across the country, asking the questions that intrigue us all: Why do we remember only a fraction of our dreams? Why are dreams usually ...
See more details below
Available through our Marketplace sellers.
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (20) from $1.99   
  • New (1) from $70.00   
  • Used (19) from $1.99   
Close
Sort by
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Note: Marketplace items are not eligible for any BN.com coupons and promotions
$70.00
Seller since 2014

Feedback rating:

(149)

Condition:

New — never opened or used in original packaging.

Like New — packaging may have been opened. A "Like New" item is suitable to give as a gift.

Very Good — may have minor signs of wear on packaging but item works perfectly and has no damage.

Good — item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Acceptable — item is in working order but may show signs of wear such as scratches or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Used — An item that has been opened and may show signs of wear. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Refurbished — A used item that has been renewed or updated and verified to be in proper working condition. Not necessarily completed by the original manufacturer.

New
Brand new.

Ships from: acton, MA

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Close
Sort by
The Mind at Night: The New Science of How and Why We Dream

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • NOOK HD/HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK Study
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$9.99
BN.com price
(Save 28%)$14.00 List Price
This digital version does not exactly match the physical book displayed here.

Overview


Psychologists and philosophers have long grappled with the mysteries of dreaming, and now-thanks largely to recent innovations in brain imaging -neuroscientists are starting to join the conversation. In this groundbreaking book, award-winning journalist Andrea Rock traces the brief but fascinating history of this emerging field. She then takes us into modern sleep labs across the country, asking the questions that intrigue us all: Why do we remember only a fraction of our dreams? Why are dreams usually accompanied by intense emotions? Can dreams truly spark creative thought or help solve problems? Are the universal dream interpretations of Freud and Jung valid? Accessible and engaging, The Mind at Night shines a bright light on our nocturnal journeys and tells us what the sleeping mind reveals about our waking hours.
Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
This exceptionally lucid and engaging work of science writing explicates breakthroughs in the study of the dreaming mind from the 1950s to the present day. Rock, an award-winning medical and science reporter, proves a crisp and thorough storyteller as she portrays the professional tensions among scientific innovators and delineates theoretical controversies (in which the legacy of Freud looms large). She frequently cites interviews with neuroscientists and psychologists, bringing out the drama of their intellectual struggles. Opening with the discovery of the REM phase of sleep by a lowly University of Chicago graduate student, Rock charts the subsequent explosion in dream research: investigations into the roles of different parts of the brain in dreaming; theories of animal dreaming and the evolutionary history of dreaming; the nature of memory; and the neurological relationships among dreaming, mental illness and consciousness itself. Examples of dreams are kept to a relevant minimum, but many statistics of interest are reported. In Rock's concluding chapters, a seamlessly narrated account of a period of sustained scientific focus on the dreaming mind eases into a broader discussion of the function of dreaming in the context of contemporary scientific findings and beliefs. Here Rock discourages simplistic dream-symbol decoding in favor of a more complex approach enlightened by present-day theories. (Mar. 1) Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
The scientific lowdown on post-Freudian theories of dreams and dreaming. Science journalist Rock begins with Eugene Aserinsky's discovery in the early 1950s that REM (rapid eye motion) sleep is characterized by vivid dreaming. That was the first indication that the sleeping mind was not in some passive state, but was hard at work. Aserinsky's fellow grad student William Dement took the next step, describing the five stages of normal sleep, from relaxed presleep to deep sleep characterized by slow brain waves, during which sleep-walking sometimes occurs. REM episodes occupy a quarter of sleep time, and occur several times a night. During the 1960s, Dement stayed up to monitor thousands of sleeping volunteers, waking them when their eye movements indicated dreaming and asking them what they were experiencing. Animal experiments showed that cats also experience REM, often at the same time going through the motions of hunting. The next generation of dream researchers debated whether Freud's theories that dreams recapitulated childhood trauma were still tenable in the face of evidence that dream images arise from random activity of the brain stem. For one thing, REM sleep evidently occurs in the womb; on the other hand, studies indicate significant differences between juvenile and adult dreams, suggesting that experience does play a part in both the content and complexity of dreams. The brain wants to make sense of whatever it views, organizing the imagery of dreams into coherent stories even when the images themselves appear nonsensical. Some dreamers can recognize that they are dreaming-and even influence the plot and content of their dream. While the biological purpose of dreaming remainscontroversial, the application of new technologies (MRI scans, etc.) is expected to further expand our understanding of one of the mind's most fascinating activities. A well-written, often entertaining look inside the mind. Agent: Michelle Tessler/Carlisle & Co.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780738207551
  • Publisher: Basic Books
  • Publication date: 3/1/2004
  • Series: Art of Mentoring Series
  • Pages: 240
  • Product dimensions: 6.45 (w) x 9.60 (h) x 0.80 (d)

Meet the Author


Andrea Rock is the recipient of many awards, including the National Magazine Award, the prestigious Investigative Reporters and Editors Award, the Henry Luce citation for outstanding reporting, and the American Academy of Family Physicians Award for outstanding reporting. She lives in Croton-on-Hudson, New York.
Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Preface
Rockettes, EEGs, and Banana Cream Pie 1
The Anti-Freud 17
Experiments of Nature 41
The Lesson of the Spiny Anteater 61
Rerunning the Maze 77
Nocturnal Therapy 101
The Ultimate Spin Doctor 121
Creative Chaos 135
Altered States 149
Consciousness and Beyond 173
Epilogue 187
Acknowledgments 201
Notes 203
Bibliography 213
Index 219
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)