The Mind's Eye: Art and Theological Argument in the Middle Ages

Overview

The Mind's Eye focuses on the relationships among art, theology, exegesis, and literature?issues long central to the study of medieval art, yet ripe for reconsideration. Essays by leading scholars from many fields examine the illustration of theological commentaries, the use of images to expound or disseminate doctrine, the role of images within theological discourse, the development of doctrine in response to images, and the place of vision and the visual in theological ...

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Overview

The Mind's Eye focuses on the relationships among art, theology, exegesis, and literature—issues long central to the study of medieval art, yet ripe for reconsideration. Essays by leading scholars from many fields examine the illustration of theological commentaries, the use of images to expound or disseminate doctrine, the role of images within theological discourse, the development of doctrine in response to images, and the place of vision and the visual in theological thought.

At issue are the ways in which theologians responded to the images that we call art and in which images entered into dialogue with theological discourse. In what ways could medieval art be construed as argumentative in structure as well as in function? Are any of the modes of representation in medieval art analogous to those found in texts? In what ways did images function as vehicles, not merely vessels, of meaning and signification? To what extent can exegesis and other genres of theological discourse shed light on the form, as well as the content and function, of medieval images? These are only some of the challenging questions posed by this unprecedented and interdisciplinary collection, which provides a historical framework within which to reconsider the relationship between seeing and thinking, perception and the imagination in the Middle Ages.

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What People Are Saying

Adam Cohen
The Mind's Eye represents the most significant collection of essays on medieval art that has been assembled in recent memory, and its implications for the understanding of medieval art and society will be felt for a long time to come. Rarely does a group of conference proceedings demonstrate such a uniformly high quality of intellectual accomplishment, and credit is due not only to the contributors themselves, but also to the editors for bringing together such an important group of scholars in the first place. Indeed, the volume demonstrates, among other things, the inadequacy of modern disciplinary boundaries in addressing medieval history in general and medieval art in particular; this is a model of what interdisciplinarity should be.
Adam Cohen, University of Toronto
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Product Details

Meet the Author

Jeffrey F. Hamburger is Professor in the Department of History of Art & Architecture at Harvard University. His books include "St. John the Divine: The Deified Evangelist in Medieval Art and Theology" and "The Visual and the Visionary: Art and Female Spirituality in Late Medieval Germany". Anne-Marie Bouche is Visiting Assistant Professor in the Department of Art History & Archaeology at Columbia University.

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Table of Contents

Introduction by Jeffrey F. Hamburger
The Place of Theology in Medieval Art History: Problems, Positions, Possibilities by Jeffrey F. Hamburger
Anthropology and the Use of Religious Images in the Opus Caroli Regis (Libri Carolini) by Karl F. Morrison
Replica: Images of Identity and the Identity of Images in Prescholastic France by Brigitte Miriam Bedos-Rezak
Is There a Theology of the Gothic Cathedral? A Re-reading of Abbot Suger's Writings on the Abbey Church of St.-Denis by Andreas Speer
Christ and the Vision of God: The Biblical Diagrams of the Codex Amiatinus by Celia Chazelle
Raban Maur, Bernard de Clairvaux, Bonaventure: expression de l'espace et topographie spirituelle dans les images médiévales by Christian Heck
Typology and Its Uses in the Moralized Bible by Christopher Hughes
L'Exception corporelle: à propos de l'Assomption de Marie by Jean-Claude Schmitt
Theologians as Trinitarian Iconographers by Bernard McGinn
Seeing and Seeing Beyond: The Mass of St. Gregory in the Fifteenth Century by Caroline Walker Bynum
Porous Subject Matter and Christ's Haunted Infancy by Alfred Acres
Love's Arrows: Christ as Cupid in Late Medieval Art and Devotion by Barbara Newman
Moving Images in the Mind's Eye by Marty Carruthers
Vox Imaginis: Anomaly and Enigma in Romanesque Art by Anne-Marie Bouché
Seeing as Action and Passion in the Thirteenth and Fourteenth Centuries by Katherine H. Tachau
"As far as the eye can see. . .": Rituals of Gazing in the Late Middle Ages by Thomas Lentes
The Medieval Work of Art: Wherein the "Work"? Wherein the "Art"? by Jeffrey F. Hamburger
Turning a Blind Eye: Medieval Art and the Dynamics of Contemplation by Herbert L. Kessler

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