The Miniaturist: A Novel

( 22 )

Overview

On a brisk autumn day in 1686, eighteen-year-old Nella Oortman arrives in Amsterdam to begin a new life as the wife of illustrious merchant trader Johannes Brandt. But her new home, while splendorous, is not welcoming. Johannes is kind yet distant, always locked in his study or at his warehouse office–leaving Nella alone with his sister, the sharp-tongued and forbidding Marin.

But Nella's life changes when Johannes presents her with an extraordinary wedding gift: a cabinet-sized...

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The Miniaturist: A Novel

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Overview

On a brisk autumn day in 1686, eighteen-year-old Nella Oortman arrives in Amsterdam to begin a new life as the wife of illustrious merchant trader Johannes Brandt. But her new home, while splendorous, is not welcoming. Johannes is kind yet distant, always locked in his study or at his warehouse office–leaving Nella alone with his sister, the sharp-tongued and forbidding Marin.

But Nella's life changes when Johannes presents her with an extraordinary wedding gift: a cabinet-sized replica of their home. To furnish her gift, Nella engages the services of a miniaturist–an elusive and enigmatic artist whose tiny creations mirror their real-life counterparts in eerie and unexpected ways...

Johannes's gift helps Nella pierce the closed world of the Brandt household. But as she uncovers its unusual secrets, she begins to understand–and fear–the escalating dangers that await them all. In this repressively pious society where gold is worshipped second only to God, to be different is a threat to the moral fabric of society, and not even a man as rich as Johannes is safe. Only one person seems to see the fate that awaits them. Is the miniaturist the key to their salvation...or the architect of their destruction?

Enchanting, beautifully written, and exquisitely suspenseful, The Miniaturist is a magnificent story of love and obsession, betrayal and retribution, appearance and truth.

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Editorial Reviews

From Barnes & Noble

"Feminist golden-age fiction" is how The Miniaturist was billed during publisher bidding wars over the rights, but even that hardly renders full justice to the debut of Londoner Jessie Burton. Set in late 17th century Amsterdam, this richly researched fiction traces the story of new arrival Nella Oortman, an 18-year-old recently yoked to 39-year-old merchant Johannes Brandt, who clearly seems more married to commerce than to his wife. His wedding gift of an expensive replica of their home becomes the focus of Nella's imaginative life and she engages a miniaturist to furnish its empty rooms. But when new pieces begin to arrive unbidden, the inexperienced teenager is startled by glimmers of an unfolding fate.... A Discover Great New Writers selection; editor's recommendation.

Publishers Weekly
06/23/2014
Late 17th-century Amsterdam is the sumptuous backdrop for this debut novel about a young Dutch girl from the village of Assendelft, Nella Oortman, who is chosen to be the bride of Johannes Brandt, a wealthy merchant with a shocking secret. Not long after Nella’s arrival in the city, her enigmatic husband presents her with a beautifully wrought cabinet, an exact replica of the house in which they live with Brandt’s sister, Marin, and their loyal servants. Nella engages a miniaturist to fill it and begins to encounter mysteries no one is willing to explain, secrets in which everyone in the household is implicated. The elusive miniaturist, too, seems to know more than Nella, as reflected in the tiny dolls and furniture he creates for the cabinet. The artisan may even be able to predict the future: he sends Nella portentous objects she has not commissioned, such as a cradle and a perfect replica of Brandt’s beloved dog stained with blood. As in all good historical novels, the setting is a major character; in this case the city of Amsterdam, with its waterways and warehouses, confectioners’ shops, and kitchens, teems with period detail. Myriad plot twists involve Brandt’s commercial activities, especially the stores of precious sugar cones from Surinam, and the tragic, fatal consequences of illicit love affairs. Strangely enough, however, the central mystery, the miniaturist’s uncanny knowledge of the future, is never solved, and the reader is left unsatisfied. (Aug.)
—The Guardian
“A fabulously gripping read that will appeal to fans of Girl With a Pearl Earring and The Goldfinch, but Burton is a genuinely new voice with her visceral take on sex, race and class...”
—S.J. Watson
“The Miniaturist is that rarest of things - beautifully written, yet also a compelling page-turner. It’s haunting, magical, and full of surprises, the kind of book that reminds you why you fell in love with reading.”
Hannah Kent
‘Utterly transporting...one of those rare debut novels that excels in every regard. The past is brought to life in potent, sensory detail: one feels steeped in it. Burton’s prose beguiles the reader...My first instinct on finishing this book was to immediately read it again.”
—New York magazine
“This debut novel, set in 17th-century Amsterdam, hits all the marks of crossover success: taut suspense, a pluck heroine- and a possibly clairvoyant miniature-furniture designer.”
Good Housekeeping
“[A] haunting debut.”
Booklist
“A standout portrayal of the wide range of women’s ingenuity.”
Kirkus Reviews
★ 2014-06-26
A talented new writer of historical fiction evokes 17th-century Amsterdam, the opulent but dangerous Dutch capital, where an innocent young wife must navigate the intrigues of her new household. "Every woman is the architect of her own fortune," reads 18-year-old Nella Oortman in a message that will gather meaning like a rolling stone as this novel progresses. It comes from the peculiarly knowledgeable artisan who is creating miniature objects for a dollhouse-sized version of her new home, which Nella received as a wedding gift. Hastily married to a wealthy older merchant, Johannes Brandt, after her father's death left her provincial family struggling, Nella arrives alone in Amsterdam, readying herself for her unknown husband's demands. Instead, she finds herself sleeping by herself, ignored by Johannes and dismissed by his brusque sister, Marin, who rules the house and influences the business, too. Distracted by the wedding present, Nella commissions a miniaturist to supply tiny items of furniture; but these exquisite objects and their accompanying messages soon begin to bear a chilly, even prophetic relationship to people and things—suggesting their maker knows more about the family and its business than is possible or safe. In a debut that evokes Old Master interiors and landscapes, British actress Burton depicts a flourishing society built on water and trade, where women struggle to be part of the world. Her empathetic heroine, Nella, endures loneliness and confusion until a sequence of domestic shocks forces her to grow up very quickly. Finally obliged to become that architect of her own fortune, Nella acts to break the miniaturist's spell and save everything she holds dear. With its oblique storytelling, crescendo of female empowerment and wrenching ending, this novel establishes Burton as a fresh and impressive voice; book groups in particular will relish it.
Hannah Kent
‘Utterly transporting...one of those rare debut novels that excels in every regard. The past is brought to life in potent, sensory detail: one feels steeped in it. Burton’s prose beguiles the reader...My first instinct on finishing this book was to immediately read it again.”
—New York magazine
“This debut novel, set in 17th-century Amsterdam, hits all the marks of crossover success: taut suspense, a pluck heroine- and a possibly clairvoyant miniature-furniture designer.”
—The Guardian
“A fabulously gripping read that will appeal to fans of Girl With a Pearl Earring and The Goldfinch, but Burton is a genuinely new voice with her visceral take on sex, race and class...”
—S.J. Watson
“The Miniaturist is that rarest of things - beautifully written, yet also a compelling page-turner. It’s haunting, magical, and full of surprises, the kind of book that reminds you why you fell in love with reading.”
Good Housekeeping
“[A] haunting debut.”
Booklist
“A standout portrayal of the wide range of women’s ingenuity.”
New York magazine/Vulture.com
“As in Donna Tartt’s The Goldfinch, the pleasure lies in giving in to well-wrought illusions, and the result is a beach read with meat on its bones - perfect for the Labor Day transition from play to work.”
Entertainment Weekly
The Miniaturist is one of the year’s most hyped novels, and it’s easy to see why. Burton conjures every scent and crackle of Nella’s world. A-”
Cleveland Plain Dealer
“Rich in 17th century atmosphere…Debut novelist Jessie Burton has a terrific subject... All those severe portraits of people in dark clothes and starched white ruffs, along with those glossy, death-scented still lifes, spring to life.”
Washington Independent Review of Books
“The Miniaturist is a masterpiece of atmosphere and tension …. The themes Burton explores are as relevant today as they were long ago …. a thoroughly engaging, beautifully written work of historical fiction.”
Dallas Morning News
“In The Miniaturist, Burton uses a historical object - the real Petronella Oortman’s cabinet house in Amsterdam’s Rijksmuseum - as the springboard for a fantastically spun tale of love and mystery. It’s a story that astutely reflects our own age’s obsessions and prejudices, and it’s one not to be missed.”
BookPage
The Miniaturist excels in depicting Amsterdam and its wealthy upper class, and lovers of art and of Amsterdam will be drawn to Burton’s imaginative story, which flows as effortlessly as water down a canal.”
New York Daily News
“Jessie Burton nimbly transports contemporary social issues to the 17th century where a costume drama rich in historical detail is embellished with supernatural intrigue…The Miniaturist is a late-harvest summer delight.”
Tampa Bay Times
The Miniaturist is an impressive debut… Burton has created a world that, like the cabinet house, draws us in until we feel the dread and mystery and wonder that surround Nella.”
Shelf Awareness
“In Jessie Burton’s atmospheric debut, The Miniaturist, the powers of love and obsession, sins and secrets, loyalty and forgiveness bind together a cast of sympathetic characters who all have a part to play in a collectively chilling conclusion.”
The Gilmore Guide To Books
“A magical, intricate marvel of perfection… with luxurious prose that immerses the reader in the cold, damp of Amsterdam… A book that enchants from beginning to end.”
My Friends are Fiction
“A suspenseful and moving read.”
Entertainment Weekly (Must List)
“Seventeenth-century Amsterdam comes alive in this meticulously researched, enchantingly told tale.”
Library Journal
06/15/2014
This debut novel from Oxford-educated actress Burton transports the reader to Amsterdam in the winter of 1686, where the Dutch merchant class is obsessed with money and influenced by a repressive church. Eighteen-year-old Petronella arrives at her new home on the Herengracht canal to take on her role as wife to a wealthy merchant, Johannes Brandt. To help her adjust to an existence with a largely absent husband and an unfriendly household, Johannes gives Nella a cabinet house, a small replica of her residence. Nella finds a miniaturist to produce pieces for this toy, but the cryptic notes that come with his deliveries cause her to feel increasingly uneasy. As the Brandts' place in the community is threatened, Nella tries to understand the societal nuances and help her family. VERDICT Barton's writing is expressive and descriptive. While her prose is rich, it does not overwhelm the story, which takes a number of sharp turns as the truths about the Brandt family are revealed. This historical novel with its strong female characters will appeal to those who enjoy the haunting undercurrents of Carlos Ruiz Zafón's The Shadow of the Wind.—Terry Lucas, Rogers Memorial Lib., Southampton, NY
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780062306814
  • Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
  • Publication date: 8/26/2014
  • Pages: 416
  • Sales rank: 13,038
  • Product dimensions: 6.30 (w) x 9.10 (h) x 1.60 (d)

Meet the Author

Jessie Burton

Jessie Burton was born in London in 1982. She studied at Oxford University and the Central School of Speech and Drama, and still works as an actress in London. She lives in southeast London, not far from where she grew up.

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Interviews & Essays

A Conversation with Jessie Burton, Author of The Miniaturist

What was the inspiration for The Miniaturist?

I was visiting Amsterdam when I came upon this dolls' house in the Rijksmuseum. It had been built in 1686 and was a thing of true decorative beauty. The owner was a woman called Petronella Oortman, who had commissioned it as an exact replica of her own townhouse in the heart of the city. She had spent as much money on it as you might on a real house, and miniature pieces had been made for its interior as far away as Japan and China. I was so curious as to why she would miniaturise her existence, why she would purchase food she couldn't eat and chairs she couldn't sit on...and then there was the city of Amsterdam and its history. A place of trade and power, contradictions of outward modesty and bursting inward pomp - and the dolls' house was a perfect symbol of this, of the need for secrets, for control, for domestic harmony that covered over inner chaos.

Is there any part of you in Nella? In any of the other characters?

I expect there is. My best friend says she can hear me in some of Nella's lines, in some of Cornelia's too. Marin voices things that are in me, but so do Otto and Johannes. I am sort of in all of them, and then completely separate from them too. They are their own people, and I end up on the periphery, and that is how it should be.

What do you like about writing historical fiction? Do you think it allows for anything you wouldn't be able to do in a novel with a contemporary setting?

This book is set in 1686 because the real Petronella Oortman had a dolls' house commissioned for her in 1686. I wanted to honour that time, and yet I did not want to be a slave to it. Part of my intention was an impressionistic offering to the reader of what life might have been like then, certainly not to smother them with a drab historical recreation. I was as diligent as it was possible to be - and it was fascinating to discover the social habits, the food, the clothing, the grieving processes, the feasting - and then to realise, in many ways it was not so long ago, and love, and pain were very much experienced the same as they are no. I think contemporary settings probably offer the writer more lassitude in which to express herself. But I have characters with Enlightenment instincts, burgeoning desires for female rights, for racial and sexual equality. Just because that was not overtly expressed in extant documents of the time, does not mean on a private level they were not felt. So I have gifted myself this nice synthesis of eternal contemporary preoccupations that also find a home in the 'past'.?

You've been an actress. How has acting affected your writing?

I think the two disciplines are quite different! Acting is communal, it thrives on mutuality, of leaving ego at the door. In writing, you have to be director, actors, and also the draconian producer who makes sure you turn up and do the work. You are godlike. But I do think my training has aided me in terms of getting into a character's head - yet all good writers can do that, I would hope. Being an actress has given me a sense of generosity to all characters, even the 'bad' ones - to understand that being a human on this planet is a 360 degrees experience - that just because x says words to y in a certain way, it doesn't follow y receives them how x intended, or indeed even that x had even planned them to have a particular effect. No one is inherently evil, or a saint. Acting has given me an appreciation of the ambiguous, because the best playwrights often leave it open as to what the character wants. Character is fluid. Life is a series of reactions, lived in the moment and suffered (and repaired) at leisure.

Who have you discovered lately?

I have really enjoyed Life Drawing, by Robin Black. Such a good book, with scalpel precision peeling back the beauty and pain of a long marriage and everyone's crosses they openly or secretly bear. Also, Station Eleven by Emily St John Mandel. Futuristic, yet rooted in a love for the world we may lose if we're not too careful. Arts and Entertainments by Christopher Beha was so close to the bone about celebrity and fame and reality TV, I almost read it peeping through my fingers, and I am reading Erica Jong's Fear of Flying for the first time, and I really don't know what has taken me so long.

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 22 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(12)

4 Star

(3)

3 Star

(2)

2 Star

(2)

1 Star

(3)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 23 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 26, 2014

    Page turner

    Read it in one long evening today, not for the faint hearted, but a strong story line interesting characters. a historical novel well set and portrayed. A great spin on a famous doll house

    16 out of 16 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 28, 2014

    I have not read this book as yet - but I object to the 7 reviews

    I have not read this book as yet - but I object to the 7 reviews that have nothing to do with the book
    and sounds/looks like personal gibberish.  I thought we were here to be objective about a review.  Janet/AZ

    6 out of 13 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted September 3, 2014

    more from this reviewer

    This book was exceptional:) it was a bit slow in the beginning ,

    This book was exceptional:) it was a bit slow in the beginning , then it started to pick up speed and read it with in a 48 hour time period :) It was  was character driven which I love and wonderful world building! 
    For those that DIDN'T read this book: SHAME on you for using this review site as a chat or pick up site . Authors depend on honest review and ratings! I see you using this as a way to ruin her " real " reviews!:( For the person that didn't know what the story was even about and gave it a low rating..... pick the book up and at the very least READ the synopsis. It may give you a clue! Then you may actually pick up and read it.  I'm just bad, that a few thoughtless people would do this.....please for all our sakes , Grow up! I shall be listing a more in depth review on Goode ads and other sites

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 28, 2014

    Book

    Love the book.

    3 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted September 8, 2014

    more from this reviewer

    3.75 stars:  THE MINIATURIST is an historical fiction storyline

    3.75 stars:  THE MINIATURIST is an historical fiction storyline set in seventeenth century Amsterdam. Told from close third person POV, this is the story of newlywed Nella Oortman –an eighteen year old young woman whose new and much older husband –merchant trader-Johannes Brandt is emotionally distant but not unkind. As the days blend into weeks Nella learns there are secrets within the Brandt household that will change her life forever. But a gift from her husband of a miniature replica of their home will begin to foretell of a dark and dangerous future. With each new miniature piece that arrives, Nella fears that someone is watching their every move.
    The storyline follows a few months in the life of Petronella Oortman Brandt whose relationship with her husband is a matter of convenience. Left alone to her own devices, Nella begins to uncover family secrets hidden behind closed doors and secret rooms. Johannes reputation as a trader has garnered him a few loyal followers but it is his dalliances on the side that will see the beginning of the end. A negotiated promise of sales fails to produce the desired results and someone will seek revenge.

    THE MINIATURIST is a storyline that is set in 1686 around the time of the sugar cane plantation exploitation and slavery in the British West Indies. As the Dutch begin to import the candied sweet the business of trading and selling is one of critical survival. Here in lies a part of the storyline where Johannes Brandt’s personal and private life become fodder for public consumption-the politics and religion of the time will show no mercy.
    Johanne’s sister Marin plays a major role throughout the storyline but like Johanne she is emotionally distant and lacks any sort of literary color. Most of the household members remain static in their development but Johanne’s one time friends will play a role in his downfall.  It is not until the end of the story that we get a glimpse into the Brandt family dynamics and the darker secrets that they share. 

    THE MINIATURIST is a well written, dark and dramatic tale about family, betrayal, love and loss. It is a tragic look at life in the 1600s-from slavery to racism; judgment and religion; health, welfare and survival in a world where people have set themselves upon a pedestal of unreachable heights. The miniaturist is always in the background but never thoroughly explored-there are so many unanswered questions as to the who and why of the miniaturist’s involvement in the story--for all intents and purposes another storyline is required to clear up some of the mystery and to acknowledge to what purpose the miniaturist played in their lives. There is a hint of the paranormal with the miniaturist’s prophetic gifts.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 29, 2014

    Curious "mystery" but as a former owner of six doll houses

    Had to read but as this dutch doll house is one of the first and oldest collected though many in many countries were working models for builders. ever try to give away dolls houses when uncluttering to move? A wonderful hobby and world and can be very very expensive see minature rooms at art institute in chicago wee c former shopper

    2 out of 13 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 14, 2014

    A Sad Tale

    A sad, dark tale with a hopeful ending & an unsolved mystery.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 12, 2014

    Fascinating

    Couldn't put it down. Loved the setting in Amsterdam + the mysteries. Interesting female characters. Good ending.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 2, 2014

    JOINT ASHCLAN

    A thought occured to me after one of my glue sniffing escapades. Combovers are cool.

    1 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 31, 2014

    A book

    I haven't read this book yet but I want to know what this book is about.

    1 out of 12 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 31, 2014

    Drew to any girl

    Who wants to chat?

    1 out of 12 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 31, 2014

    Jim bo

    This book sucks balls

    1 out of 15 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 2, 2014

    I GIVE UP

    I'm taking your advice AUG.30-2014 to just ignore or try anyway.My comment only added fuel to the fire which I was afraid might happen.Good ole JIMBO-AUG.31 joined in I see and confirmed that thought.I normally would just blow these things off but my grand daughter will be 10 at the end of Sep. and is so excited because we thought(how ironic!!)that she would be MATURE enough to get her very own Nook because she is always messing around with mine and loves it!!We did go over this issue at hand,let her read the(reviews)and introduced her to the real world.So I guess I can thank you AUG26 1star and JIMBO-AUG31 for a lesson on NOT what to be.Thank you"gentleman"and you just have yourselves a good life.~~~~Granny B.

    1 out of 8 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 2, 2014

    To IGIVE UP

    Yea its totally believable that you are a Granny... not. If I were you I'd try harder. Its obvi you're a bored teenager. Should've used the phrase "young man" more. And should have been ... I don't know..... more aboulife lessons because thats what grandmas do. Give life lessons.

    1 out of 10 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 27, 2014

    Bjxghge

    Desrwese&""%""''"

    1 out of 22 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 26, 2014

    Hi im chandler

    Lol23252325@gmail reply back plz

    1 out of 26 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 2, 2014

    Britt to Drew

    Heyy..i will chat with you..!! ;)

    1 out of 12 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 1, 2014

    Mel to drew

    Hey! Whats up? I will be here all day tomorrow if you still want to chat! Lol!

    1 out of 12 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 26, 2014

    its sucks d.i.c.k dont buy

    Dont

    1 out of 26 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 6, 2014

    No

    No

    0 out of 8 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 23 Customer Reviews

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