The Minimum You Need to Know About Java on OpenVMS

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Up until this point, most Java programming books attempt to make the reader believe that Java is the way-of-the-future and that all other languages are soon to become obsolete. Not so with this book. The author presents Java with all of its warts while continually comparing it to C++ and sometimes C. He admits not being a fan of Java and assumes you are only interested in learning it because your superiors are forcing a Java project upon your OpenVMS system (this is probably ...
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United States 2006 Trade paperback First edition. Very good. No dust jacket as issued. Brand new stock Trade paperback (US). Glued binding. 352 p. Audience: General/trade.

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Overview

Up until this point, most Java programming books attempt to make the reader believe that Java is the way-of-the-future and that all other languages are soon to become obsolete. Not so with this book. The author presents Java with all of its warts while continually comparing it to C++ and sometimes C. He admits not being a fan of Java and assumes you are only interested in learning it because your superiors are forcing a Java project upon your OpenVMS system (this is probably more true than not).
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Editorial Reviews

Larry Miller
The author uses a colloquial writing style in the book that is easy to read. From time to time he veers off to give further insights to the points he is trying to make but never looses sight of his main objectives, and this is laudable considering the amount of information being dispensed. This is mostly seen in the form of anecdotal information sometimes to clarify his own code other times to give more of a historical perspective. This colloquial style partnered with the unique structure of the book makes for a very interesting contrast as this book could be seen as a reference manual but at its core its a lot more of a personal account on good OpenVMS programming practice by Mr Hughes. A fact that he himself doesn't hide as he relates his opinions on such practices as well as many other subjects throughout the book with a great sense of humor which makes for a much more interesting reading.

Mr Hughes great sense of humor and insight culminates in this book's final chapter called "Ruminations and Observations" which has nothing to do with OpenVMS but is more of an opinion piece on a few subjects that touch all of us that work in IT. These subjects range from the real reason Y2k happened to offshore computing to avoiding a hellhole shop, and are bound to make more than one programmer laugh with glee and more than one manager blush.

In conclusion this is a must read for anybody wanting to learn to write code in this most venerable of Operating Systems.
bookreview.com

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780977086610
  • Publisher: Logikal Solutions
  • Publication date: 7/1/2006
  • Series: The Minimum You Need to Know Series
  • Pages: 352
  • Product dimensions: 6.90 (w) x 8.80 (h) x 0.80 (d)

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 16, 2007

    An Essential Manual For Application Developers

    Roland Hughes¿ manual, The Minimum You Need to Know About Java on OpenVMS, is the second book that builds on his first book, The Minimum You Need to Know to be an OpenVMS Application Developer. Java is an object-oriented programming language that borrows much syntax from C and C++ but has a simpler object model and fewer low-level facilities. In this second book, Hughes creates and demonstrates the tools you need to make Java a usable language on OpenVMS. The author delivers an in-depth guide to overcoming the problems C/C++ programmers have with Java. He notes that the problems many have with Java are rooted in syntax and where the language came from. Because the creators of Java wanted it to be a pure OOP language, Hughes explains that in Java, most things are classes. Although appearing similar in C and C++, it is not. Java has a unique class called an Array and no defined constructor. This means values can be stored anywhere and in no specific order. In a carefully crafted and illustrated order, Hughes presents a step-by-step manual to implementing Java for more application development on OpenVMS. He points out that successfully using Java on OpenVMS requires the development of a Free Class Library. Programmers learn how to create a Class Library developed in the OOP language. As well, Hughes shows how to write Java classes using the Java Native Interface (JNI). As in the previous book, Hughes rewrites the same application (mega-zillionaire application) with each new tool. After developing the application with Java, FMS, and RMS indexed files, he redevelops the application in this book using Java with FMS and RDB. Giving systematic and easy to follow instructions, programmers learn how to build infrastructures while at the same time building the application. Readers are shown how to develop a generic class that will be usable by Indexed Files. Hughes demonstrates how to use JNI to access RMS, FMS, system services, and operating system provided libraries. As well, programmers learn to create an infrastructure MMS Procedure and how to use the supporting classes the procedure creates. Hughes shows how to access RDB by way of the JDBC driver highlighting the importance of SQL. The CD that comes with the book contains the Full Class source. Well-illustrated examples with detailed analysis, descriptions, and definitions, allow readers to follow the book while working with the server, thereby learning how to implement and operate Java on OpenVMS. Each chapter details troubleshooting tips, error handling tips, as well as providing exercises to enhance understanding of the tools. With plenty of expertise, the author presents Java with all its advantages and pitfalls while often comparing it to C++. Together with easy to follow instructions, detailed examples, and an informative chapter on the future of IT, I highly recommend the book as an asset to computer programmers and those entering the IT field. Tracy Roberts, Write Field Services

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