The Misrepresented Minority: New Insights on Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders, and the Implications for Higher Education

The Misrepresented Minority: New Insights on Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders, and the Implications for Higher Education

by Samuel D. Museus, Dina C. Maramba, Robert T. Teranishi
     
 

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While Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders (AAPIs) are growing faster than any other racial group in the U.S., they are all but invisible in higher education, and generally ignored in the research literature, and thus greatly misrepresented and misunderstood.

This book presents disaggregated data to unmask important academic achievement and other disparities within

Overview

While Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders (AAPIs) are growing faster than any other racial group in the U.S., they are all but invisible in higher education, and generally ignored in the research literature, and thus greatly misrepresented and misunderstood.

This book presents disaggregated data to unmask important academic achievement and other disparities within the population, and offers new insights that promote more authentic understandings of the realities masked by the designation of AAPI. In offering new perspectives, conceptual frameworks, and empirical research by seasoned and emerging scholars, this book both makes a significant contribution to the emerging knowledge base on AAPIs, and identifies new directions for future scholarship on this population.

Its overarching purpose is to provide policymakers, practitioners, and researchers in higher education with the information they need to serve an increasingly important segment of their student populations.

In dispelling such misconceptions as that Asian Americans are not really racial minorities, the book opens up the complexity of the racial and ethnic minorities within this group, and identifies the unique challenges that require the attention of anyone in higher education concerned with student access and success, as well as the pipeline to the professoriate.

Editorial Reviews

Dr. Bob H. Suzuki
I am highly impressed with the diversity of perspectives and issues on AAPIs addressed by this volume. It is an outstanding effort to overcome the disregard and invisibility of AAPIs in higher education and provides a more authentic and nuanced view that strongly challenges many pervasive stereotypes about this widely misunderstood but increasingly significant group.
Doris Ching
This book assembles an extensive array of extraordinarily authentic accounts of Asian American and Pacific Islander experiences. Each chapter uniquely synthesizes theory, research, and practice to inform efforts to effectuate positive campus environments for AAPIs. A must-read for policymakers, educators, and students who seek new insights and approaches to help AAPI college students succeed.
Shirley Hune
Covering topics from identity to activism and admissions to the glass ceiling, this ground-breaking volume fills a gaping hole in higher educational research on Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders. Using critical theories, national data sets, and case studies, scholars provide campuses with new findings and approaches to address the unequal treatment of AAPI students and faculty.
From the Publisher
I am highly impressed with the diversity of perspectives and issues on AAPIs addressed by this volume. It is an outstanding effort to overcome the disregard and invisibility of AAPIs in higher education and provides a more authentic and nuanced view that strongly challenges many pervasive stereotypes about this widely misunderstood but increasingly significant group.

This book assembles an extensive array of extraordinarily authentic accounts of Asian American and Pacific Islander experiences. Each chapter uniquely synthesizes theory, research, and practice to inform efforts to effectuate positive campus environments for AAPIs. A must-read for policymakers, educators, and students who seek new insights and approaches to help AAPI college students succeed.

Covering topics from identity to activism and admissions to the glass ceiling, this ground-breaking volume fills a gaping hole in higher educational research on Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders. Using critical theories, national data sets, and case studies, scholars provide campuses with new findings and approaches to address the unequal treatment of AAPI students and faculty.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781579224691
Publisher:
Stylus Publishing, LLC
Publication date:
07/28/2013
Edition description:
New Edition
Pages:
370
Product dimensions:
6.80(w) x 9.70(h) x 1.20(d)

Meet the Author

Samuel D. Museus is Assistant Professor of Educational Administration at the University of Hawaii at Manoa. His scholarship is focused on college success among underserved student populations. Specifically, his current research is aimed at understanding the role of institutional environments in minority college student adjustment, engagement, and persistence. He has produced over 100 journal articles, book chapters, and national conference presentations focused on understanding the institutional factors that shape the experiences and outcomes of racial/ethnic minority students. These include peer-reviewed articles accepted in The Review of Higher
Education, Teachers College Record, the Journal of College Student Development, and the Journal of College Student Retention. His books include Using Qualitative Methods in Institutional Assessment (2007 with Shaun R. Harper) Conducting Research on Asian Americans in Higher Education (2009), Racial and Ethnic Minority Students' Success in STEM Education (2011 with Robert T. Palmer, Ryan J. Davis, and Dina C. Maramba), Using
Mixed Methods to Study Intersectionality in Higher Education (Forthcoming, 2011 with Kimberly A. Griffin), and Creating Campus Cultures: Fostering Success among Racially Diverse Student Populations (Forthcoming, 2012 with Uma M. Jayakumar).

Dina C. Maramba is Associate Professor of Student Affairs Administration at SUNY Binghamton, and has experience as a practitioner and administrator in programs that are designed to increase the number of underrepresented students in higher education. She previously served as director of TRIO programs at the University of California, San Diego; resident director at both Colorado State University and the University of California, Santa Barbara; and coordinator of Upward Bound at Colorado State University. Her research interests include: access and success of underserved college student populations; Asian Americans/Pacific Islanders and Filipina/o Americans in higher education; equity, diversity and social justice issues in higher education; and the impact of college environments on students. Dr. Maramba earned her MS in Student Affairs in Higher Education from Colorado State University and her PhD in Higher Education from Claremont Graduate University.

Robert T. Teranishi is Associate Professor of Higher Education at New York University, co-director for the Institute for Globalization and Education in Metropolitan Settings, and a faculty affiliate with The Steinhardt Institute for Higher Education Policy. Teranishi's research is broadly focused on race, ethnicity, and the stratification of college opportunity. He has provided congressional testimony regarding the Higher Education Reauthorization Act and No Child Left Behind, informed state policy decisions related to selective college admissions, and his research has been solicited to inform U.S. Supreme Court decisions on affirmative action and school desegregation.
Teranishi was recently appointed by Secretary of Education, Arne Duncan to the U.S. Department of Education’s Equity and Excellence Commission, and was named one of the nation's top "up-and-coming" leaders by Diverse Issues in Higher Education. Teranishi is also the recipient of the Daniel E. Griffiths Research Award and the Martin Luther King, Jr. Faculty Award from NYU. His work has been supported by the Ford Foundation, Mellon Foundation, Kresge Foundation, Walmart Foundation, WT Grant, USA Funds, ETS, and the College Board.
Prior to his position at New York University, Teranishi was a National Institute for Mental Health postdoctoral fellow at the University of Pennsylvania’s W.E.B. Du Bois Research Institute. He received his B.A. from the University of California Santa Cruz in Sociology and his M.A. and Ph.D. from the University of California Los Angeles in Higher Education and Organizational Change.

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