The Mobile Receptor Hypothesis: The Role of Membrane Receptor Lateral Movement in Signal Transduction

Overview

The Fluid Mosaic model of biological membranes, formulated over 20 years ago, implies that receptors float freely within the plane of the membrane. This book is a critical exposition of the theory behind and evidence for the mobile receptor hypothesis. It treats the direct evidence for the mobile receptor hypothesis with particular respect to tyrosine kinase receptors such as those for insulin and epidermal growth factor, and the GTP-binding protein activating V1- and V2-type ...

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Paperback (Softcover reprint of the original 1st ed. 1997)
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Overview

The Fluid Mosaic model of biological membranes, formulated over 20 years ago, implies that receptors float freely within the plane of the membrane. This book is a critical exposition of the theory behind and evidence for the mobile receptor hypothesis. It treats the direct evidence for the mobile receptor hypothesis with particular respect to tyrosine kinase receptors such as those for insulin and epidermal growth factor, and the GTP-binding protein activating V1- and V2-type receptors for vasopressin.

The book contains black-and-white illustrations.

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Editorial Reviews

Booknews
Elucidates some critical mechanisms of biological cell phones, signal transmission at the level of the membrane, the primary transducer of extracellular signals represented by hormones, growth factor, and other chemicals. Elaborates the theory and experimental evidence that receptors can diffuse freely within the plane of the membrane and that the diffusion is what allows interactions between protein signaling components. The theory has been accepted for two decades, but little studied. The goal is to encourage researchers to think of the membrane as two-dimensional rather than one, as a lattice of sites for interactions rather than an inert barrier to keep insides of the cell in and everything else out. Annotation c. by Book News, Inc., Portland, Or.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781475706826
  • Publisher: Springer US
  • Publication date: 4/30/2013
  • Series: Molecular Biology Intelligence Unit Series
  • Edition description: Softcover reprint of the original 1st ed. 1997
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 224
  • Product dimensions: 6.00 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 0.51 (d)

Table of Contents

1. Introduction to the Mobile Receptor Hypothesis.- A. The Fluid Mosaic Model of Biological Membranes.- B. The Mobile Receptor Hypothesis.- C. Modern Collision Coupling Theory.- D. Summary and Implications.- 2. Direct Measurement of Lateral Mobility.- A. Introduction.- B. Fluorescence Microscopy.- C. Confocal Microscopy.- D. Fluorescence Photobleaching Recovery.- E. Lateral Mobility in the Cytoplasm and Membranes of Living Cells.- F. Measurements in Artificial and Isolated Membranes.- G. Measurements of Lateral Mobility Using Other Methods.- H. Summary.- 3. Parameters Affecting Plasma Membrane Protein Lateral Mobility.- A. Mechanisms of Protein Immobilization in Biological Membranes.- B. Membrane Lipid Mobility.- C. The Cytoskeleton.- D. Anchorage Modulation.- E. Membrane Protein Sequence Motifs.- F. Domain Structure: Regions of Restricted Mobility.- G. Signal Transduction.- H. Summary.- 4. Lateral Mobility of Polypeptide Hormone Receptors and GTP-Binding Proteins.- A. Introduction.- B. Practical Considerations.- C. Lateral Mobility Measurements of Polypeptide Hormone Receptors.- D. Tyrosine Kinase Receptor-Mediated Signal Transduction.- E. GTP-Binding Protein Activating Receptor-Mediated Signal Transduction.- F. Structural Considerations.- G. Lateral Mobility Measurements of GTP-Binding Proteins.- H. Lateral Mobility of Cytokine Receptors.- I. Summary and Implications for Signal Transduction.- 5. Evidence for the Role of Membrane Receptor Lateral Movement in GTP-Binding Protein-Mediated Signal Transduction.- A. Introduction.- B. Kinetic Considerations in GTP-Binding Protein-Mediated Receptor-Effector Systems.- C. Indirect Evidence for a Role of Receptor Lateral Movement in GTP-Binding Protein-Mediated Signal Transduction.- D. Direct Evidence for a Role of Receptor Lateral Movement in GTP-Binding Protein-Mediated Signal Transduction.- E. Ga Signaling in the Cytosolic Phase.- F. Stoichiometric Considerations and Trimeric GTP-Binding Protein Immobility.- G. Amplification in GTP-Binding Protein-Mediated Receptor-Effector Systems Through Receptor Lateral Movement.- H. Summary.- 6. Evidence for the Role of Receptor Immobilization in Desensitization Subsequent to Hormonal Stimulation.- A. Introduction.- B. Receptor Internalization in Desensitization of Response.- C. Receptor Immobilization Prior to Internalization.- D. Receptor Movement Required for Internalization.- E. Kinetic Considerations with Respect to Lateral Mobility Measurements.- F. Receptor Phosphorylation.- G. Studies with Receptor Antagonists—Receptor Immobilization Is Agonist-Dependent.- H. Summary.- 7. Evidence for the Role of Immobilization of Ligand-Occupied Membrane Receptors in Signal Transduction.- A. Introduction.- B. Receptor Immobilization in Tyrosine Kinase Receptor Signaling.- C. Receptor Immobilization in Signaling by Fc Receptors.- D. Receptor Immobilization in Cell-Cell Interaction.- E. Receptor Immobilization in Cell-Adhesion to an Extracellular Substratum.- F. Summary.- 8. The Mobile Receptor Hypothesis: A Global View.- A. Introduction.- B. Receptor Lateral Movement in Signal Transduction.- C. The Central Role of the Cytoskeleton.- D. Signal Transduction: Receptor Lateral Mobility Modulation by Heterologous Signaling.- E. Potential Pharmacological Applications of the Mobile Receptor Hypothesis.- F. Concluding Remarks.

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