The Monarchy: A Critique of Britain's Favourite Fetish [NOOK Book]

Overview

'Why, when the subject of royalty or monarchy is mentioned, do the British bid adieu to every vestige of proportion, modesty, humour and restraint? '

This is not a call for the monarchy?s abolition by fiat; illusions cannot be abolished. This is an invitation to think.

In this scathing essay, Christopher Hitchens looks at the relationship of the press and the public to the royal family, unpacking the tautology and contradictory arguments that ...

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The Monarchy: A Critique of Britain's Favourite Fetish

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Overview

'Why, when the subject of royalty or monarchy is mentioned, do the British bid adieu to every vestige of proportion, modesty, humour and restraint? '

This is not a call for the monarchy’s abolition by fiat; illusions cannot be abolished. This is an invitation to think.

In this scathing essay, Christopher Hitchens looks at the relationship of the press and the public to the royal family, unpacking the tautology and contradictory arguments that prop it up. In his inimitable style, Hitchens argues that our desire not to profane or disturb the monarchy is a failure of reason and a confusion of reality. Fealty to the magic of monarchy stops us looking objectively at our own history and hinders open-minded criticism of our present. It is time we outgrew it.

With the Queen’s Diamond Jubilee upon us, during a time of recession, high unemployment and national debt, Hitchens’ 10,000-word critique is even more relevant today than when it was first published in 1990.

Part of the Brain Shots series, the pre-eminent source for high quality, short-form digital non-fiction.

'Christopher is one of the most terrifying rhetoricians that the world has yet seen.' Martin Amis



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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781448155354
  • Publisher: Random House Adult Trade Publishing Group
  • Publication date: 5/29/2012
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 40
  • Sales rank: 269,339
  • File size: 534 KB

Meet the Author

Christopher Hitchens

CHRISTOPHER HITCHENS was born April 13, 1949, in England and graduated from Balliol College at Oxford University. The father of three children, he was the author of more than twenty books and pamphlets, including collections of essays, criticism, and reportage. His book, God Is Not Great: How Religion Poisons Everything, was a finalist for the 2007 National Book Award in the United States and was an international bestseller. His bestselling memoir, Hitch-22, was a finalist for the 2010 National Book Critics Circle Award for autobiography. His 2011 bestselling omnibus of selected essays, Arguably, was named by the New York Times as one of the ten best books of the year. A visiting professor of liberal studies at the New School in New York City, he was also the I.F. Stone professor at the Graduate School of Journalism at the University of California, Berkeley. He was a columnist, literary critic, and contributing editor at Vanity Fair, The Atlantic, Slate, Times Literary Supplement, The Nation, New Statesman, World Affairs, Free Inquiry, among other publications. He died in Houston, Texas, on December 15, 2011. His posthumous memoir, Mortality, will be published in the fall of 2012.

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Customer Reviews

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Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews
  • Posted January 13, 2015

    Hitchens wrote this short book most likely for the Windsor famil

    Hitchens wrote this short book most likely for the Windsor family and their monarchy, but it's made accessible to his fans that enjoy his style of iconoclastic journaling and focus. Unlike, thousands of other expatriate British authors he isn't vying for American colonization of England, or Indian, Australian, or Canadian colonization of the area. In fact, the book isn't really about England. It's about Britain, or Scotland and England and most likely Wales. British entailing more than one country, but less than the UK. Not even the entire area of Europe, and some Middle-Eastern countries which still have many of these titles that originated during the Middle Ages. He makes a warning to them. Yes, he does. You'll have to read the book, but he has studied the wrongs of unlimited power amongst the few. While the UK has a strong currency at the moment, there has been periods when the US dollar was stronger. The region of the EU is quite a bit larger in physical size and if they worked together they could probably easily surpass the buying power of the pound.




    While Hitchens lived in the area of Britain and attended college at Oxford he also spent some time in the US, such as working for The Atlantic and even wrote a biography of Thomas Jefferson, the third president of the country. Of course, the USA has had a bad relationship with mainly England during the Seven Years War and its time of independence, in other wars they fought as allies.




    This book is pretty brief, curt, and gets to the point of his idea. He doesn't spend a chapter talking about why he doesn't like Mormonism, Islam, or Christianity and then return to the topic of monarchy, even though there are probably at least a few people that are very religious in the monarchy. Hitchens is not listed as having any of the titles associated with royalty, possibly because he decided to publish this book, not even a paltry "sir".

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 30, 2013

    It's the Hitch. How could it not be exceptional?

    It's the Hitch. How could it not be exceptional?

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
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