The Money Tree

Overview

Miss McGillicuddy's simple country routine continues through-out the year in spite of a very unusual tree growing in her yard.

In summer the leaves on the strange tree growing in Miss McGillicuddy's yard are harvested by many people, but when Miss McGillicuddy thinks about needing firewood for the winter, she realizes the tree may have another use.

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Overview

Miss McGillicuddy's simple country routine continues through-out the year in spite of a very unusual tree growing in her yard.

In summer the leaves on the strange tree growing in Miss McGillicuddy's yard are harvested by many people, but when Miss McGillicuddy thinks about needing firewood for the winter, she realizes the tree may have another use.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
PW praised Small's ``evocative, pastel-filled watercolors,'' adding that the story of Miss McGillicuddy, her garden and her greedy neighbors ``will raise worthwhile questions for both children and adults.'' Ages 5-8. (Apr.)
School Library Journal
PreS-Gr 3-- In January Miss McGillicuddy notices a strange tree in her yard. Month by month, as the seasons change, it grows, faster than any normal plant, into a money tree. Friends, then neighbors, then strangers, then a crowd, ``surging back and forth,'' come to pluck its leaves. Each page recounts, in two sentences of restrained text, Miss McGillicuddy's seasonal activities and her observations of the tree and its changes. The illustrations in pale watercolors show the woman as tall, willowy, and faintly old-fashioned. She's a little out of touch with the times perhaps, but obviously at home with her own life and therefore attractive and pleasing. She is usually placed to the side of the picture, pausing in her activity to observe the tree, which is not always seen by readers. This enhances the sense of Miss McGillicuddy as an observer. The only double-page spread shows the crowds scrambling for the money leaves. It is done with black silhouettes against a dark blue and purple sky, separating it pictorially from the pale orderly pictures of Miss McGillicuddy's world. This quirky little story has charm, but it is perhaps too quiet and the woman too passive an observer for most children. She seems so cool and remote from the tree and the greedy crowds that when she takes action and cuts it up for firewood, the sense of completion and problem solved is diffused. Nevertheless, although not wildly ironic like Heide's Treehorn's Treasure (Holiday, 1981), this book, in a quiet way, makes a definite statement about the foibles of humankind. --Karen James, Louisville Free Public Library, KY
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780606299817
  • Publisher: San Val, Incorporated
  • Publication date: 2/28/2004
  • Format: Library Binding
  • Product dimensions: 9.98 (w) x 8.26 (h) x 0.40 (d)

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