The Moogees Move House
  • The Moogees Move House
  • The Moogees Move House

The Moogees Move House

by Leslie McGuirk
     
 

Leslie McGuirk spins the story of a very particular family in search of a home, with lively verse and quirky illustrations.

The Moogees want very much to find a new home. Mama Moogee says, "We need a new place that is on the ground. It would be nice if it were round." Papa Moogee adds, "I’d love to find a home with class, a nice wide

…  See more details below

Overview

Leslie McGuirk spins the story of a very particular family in search of a home, with lively verse and quirky illustrations.

The Moogees want very much to find a new home. Mama Moogee says, "We need a new place that is on the ground. It would be nice if it were round." Papa Moogee adds, "I’d love to find a home with class, a nice wide yard, and plenty of grass." But the three little Moogies just scream, "WAA WAA MOOGEE DOOGEE WEE WEE LOW LUM!" Mr. Ruru, the real estate agent, tries hard to help them find the perfect place, but the Moogees think all the houses are too blue, too expensive, or look like a piece of cheese. Will they ever find a house to call their own? As the Moogees discover, the family you share it with is the most important part!

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Stories about moving are a dime a dozen, but not McGuirk’s; although the plot is straightforward, the hallucinatory strangeness of the cast and setting will leave an indelible, Moogee-shaped mark on readers. With yellow polka-dotted skin, curled snouts, and pronged tails resembling toy jacks, the Moogees look like the product of the psychedelic art movement. When they go in search of a new house with Mr. Ruru, the realtor, they have trouble finding the ideal fit. One house offers a yard full of bizarre statues and a free pet snail, seen leashed to an orange and blue tree. “This yard and snail are quite delightful,” says Mama Moogee, “but those statues are truly frightful” (she’s right, too: the expressions on the statues’ faces range from uncomfortable to psychotic). Of course, young readers will be most interested in screaming along with the three young Moogees, as they express their unintelligible opinion of each house: “Waa waa moogee doogee wee wee low lum!” Despite the willful weirdness, McGuirk’s (the Tucker series) story has a conventional “family first” message at its core. Annoyingly great or greatly annoying? Maybe some of both. Ages 3–6. (Nov.)
Children's Literature - Joella Peterson
The Moogees are a family of strange creatures who are looking for a new house. They know just what type of house they want, even though they don't tell their realtor, Mr. Ruru. As Mr. Ruru shows them house after house the Moogee parents find one thing after another that makes it so they don't want the house (one house is the color blue, one house has statues, one house is shaped like Swiss Cheese, etc). All the while the three little Moogees keep saying "Waa waa moogee doogee wee wee low lum!" Mr. Ruru has no idea what the Moogee children are saying until they see the last house that fits Mr. and Mrs. Moogee's desired descriptions perfectly. Apparently the children were saying, "We'll be happy anywhere as long as we've got our family there!" With such an odd story and strange creatures, children who read this book must enjoy bizarre stories and have a high tolerance of the nonsensical. Reviewer: Joella Peterson
School Library Journal
K-Gr 1—A family of Moogees, piglike yellow creatures with spots and rolled-under noses, is searching for a new house. A realtor takes them to see a series of possible homes: a blue, castlelike affair with eight chimneys and a yukie-yukie tree, a green one with a statue-lined driveway, and a third in the shape of a wedge of cheese. Mama and Papa Moogee's complaints are expressed in two-line rhymes. "Of course, this house will never do./I'm not particularly fond of blue." The children's response is always, "Waa waa moogee doogee wee wee low lum!" With trepidation, the realtor offers a fourth house that turns out to be perfect. And with the successful sale, he figures out that the children's chant means, "We'll be happy anywhere/as long as we've got our family there!" How he does that is never made clear. The illustrations are spare, done with markers and black outline on a white background. Although the point of family togetherness is made, there's nothing special here to carry the predictable story.—Ieva Bates, Ann Arbor District Library, MI

Read More

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780763655587
Publisher:
Candlewick Press
Publication date:
11/13/2012
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
7.20(w) x 10.50(h) x 0.50(d)
Age Range:
3 - 7 Years

Meet the Author

Leslie McGuirk is the author-illustrator of several books about Tucker the dog. She is also the illustrator and co-author, with Alex von Bidder, of Wiggens Learns His Manners at the Four Seasons Restaurant. Leslie McGuirk lives in Vero Beach, Florida.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >