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The Moon Might Be Milk
     

The Moon Might Be Milk

by Lisa Shulman, Will Hillenbrand (Illustrator)
 

Rosie wonders: What is the moon made of? Cat thinks the moon is a saucer of fresh milk, spilled from the sky into puddles on the ground. Dog thinks it’s a pat of sweet, creamy butter. Butterfly thinks it’s made of sugar: sticky and sparkling and oh, so sweet. But Gran knows best. Using milk, butter, sugar, and other ingredients, she shows Rosie

Overview

Rosie wonders: What is the moon made of? Cat thinks the moon is a saucer of fresh milk, spilled from the sky into puddles on the ground. Dog thinks it’s a pat of sweet, creamy butter. Butterfly thinks it’s made of sugar: sticky and sparkling and oh, so sweet. But Gran knows best. Using milk, butter, sugar, and other ingredients, she shows Rosie how to bake moonshaped cookies and captures a magical piece of the moon in her very own kitchen.

This classic-in-the-making from Gran’s hearth is sure to inspire family baking and sharing. Sugar cookie recipe included.

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Phyllis Kennemer
Rosie awakes in the early morning and watches the large round moon sink in the sky. "I wonder what it's made of," she asks Cat. Cat tells her the moon is a saucer of fresh milk that spilled from the sky into puddles on the ground. Maybe. Rosie is not sure, so she and Cat ask Hen. Hen tells them the moon is a large egg that hatches small shining chicks as stars. Maybe. These characters wander into the meadow and ask a butterfly. The butterfly replies that the moon is made of sugar: sticky, sparkling, and sweet. Dog tells them that the moon is made of creamy butter, and Mouse reports that it is made of flour, providing the clouds in the sky. Somehow, Rosie does not think she has found the correct answer yet. She returns to the house with her animal friends following close behind. Rosie explains the various opinions about the composition of the moon to her grandmother. Gran combines all of the ingredients mentioned in a large bowl and makes cookies. The sugar cookies do look just like the moon and they are delicious. The recipe appears in the back of the book. Large, full-color, cartoonlike illustrations fill the pages, making this a good choice for read-aloud time—especially if sugar cookies are served to the listeners afterwards.
School Library Journal

PreS-K
As Rosie watches the full moon sink in the sky, she ponders what it is made of. Cat thinks it is a saucer of milk, but Hen says it's an egg from which chicks hatch to become the stars. Butterfly says it's made of sugar; Dog thinks it's a round pat of butter; and Mouse believes it is made of white flour, which makes clouds when the wind blows. Finally, Gran settles the matter by mixing a batch of moon-shaped cookies, using all the ingredients mentioned in a satisfying, tasty resolution to this story that has wide appeal. Childlike illustrations in soft patterns and colors complement the delightful whimsy.
—Sally R. DowCopyright 2006 Reed Business Information.

Kirkus Reviews
Rosie wonders what the moon is made of; her cat purrs, "a saucer of fresh milk." And off they set to ask their other animal friends what they think. Hen cackles, "an egg and small shining chicks hatch from it to become stars"; Butterfly whispers, "it's made of sugar"; Dog licks his lips, "a round pat of sweet butter"; Mouse claims, "you're all wrong, it's made of white flour that the wind blows to make powdery clouds." Rosie says "Gram will know," and they all race back to the house where Gran proves they are all right as she takes each item and mixes them together and bakes moon-shaped cookies. The story is gentle and flavored with elements of other cumulative tales for a young audience. Broad images depict the scenes with bits of collage and patterned textures and Tomie dePaola-style faces. A sweet bedtime tale that's sure to elicit a cookie request. (recipe included) (Picture book. 3-6)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780525476474
Publisher:
Penguin Publishing Group
Publication date:
03/15/2007
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
10.30(w) x 10.36(h) x 0.39(d)
Age Range:
3 - 8 Years

Meet the Author

Lisa Shulman is the author of several picture books, including The Matzo Ball Boy. She lives in California.

Will Hillenbrand is the popular illustrator of many picture books. He lives in Ohio.

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