The Moon Moth

The Moon Moth

by Jack Vance, Humayoun Ibrahim
     
 

A classic science fiction tale finds new life in this graphic novel adaptation.

A fascinating blend of murder mystery and high-concept science fiction, The Moon Moth has long been hailed as one of Jack Vance's greatest works. And now this intricately crafted tale is available in glorious full color as a new graphic novel.

Edwer Thissell, the new

Overview

A classic science fiction tale finds new life in this graphic novel adaptation.

A fascinating blend of murder mystery and high-concept science fiction, The Moon Moth has long been hailed as one of Jack Vance's greatest works. And now this intricately crafted tale is available in glorious full color as a new graphic novel.

Edwer Thissell, the new consul from Earth to the planet Sirene, is having all kinds of trouble adjusting to the local culture. The Sirenese cover their faces with exquisitely crafted masks that indicate their social status. Thissell, a bumbling foreigner, wears a mask of very low status: the Moon Moth.

Shortly after Thissell arrives on Sirene, he finds himself embroiled in a an unsolved murder case made all the more mysterious by the fact that since everyone must always wear a mask, you can never be sure who you're dealing with.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Barely out of school, Edwer Thissel is appointed consular representative to the world Sirene, which Edwer soon learns enforces its social norms—including the universal habit of wearing masks—with lethal ferocity. Three months after arriving on Sirene, Edwer is informed that the deadly assassin Haxo Angmark is en route to Sirene; ordered to detain the criminal, the naïve Edwer faces the task of finding a killer in a society where every person’s face is concealed. Honored as one of science fiction’s Grand Masters, Vance demonstrates his rich vocabulary and skill at depicting unfamiliar cultures in this classic SF story from the 1960s. Unfortunately, Ibrahim’s effort to translate Vance’s prose into realized illustrations falls short; the art is often crude and displeasing to the eye, the antithesis of Vance’s precise voice. Vance’s contribution is enough to carry Ibrahim; readers intrigued by this volume may be assured even better works by Vance await them. (May)
From the Publisher

“Honored as one of science fiction's Grand Masters, Vance demonstrates his rich vocabulary and skill at depicting unfamiliar cultures in this classic SF story from the 1960s.” —Publishers Weekly
Children's Literature - Raina Sedore
A government envoy is assigned to work on an alien planet where social standards and etiquette hinge lethally on appropriate use of masks and musical instruments. All speech is accompanied by hand-held instruments and no face is ever seen without a mask. When the envoy is tasked with capturing a convicted criminal hiding out on the planet, his job is complicated by his inability to see any citizen's skin-and-bones face and his own bungled attempts to navigate the culture. Vance's 1961 short story is a fascinating mix of anthropological imagination and old-fashioned mystery. Ibrahim's illustrations have a non-western feeling to them—the masks the planet inhabitants wear look like creations straight out of southeastern Asia or ancient South American traditions. The story is preceded by an essay entitled "The Genre Artist" by Carlo Rotella which originally appeared in The New York Times Magazine. Vance's unique language is intact in the dialog. The complexity of Vance's themes, coupled with the not-particularly-accessible illustration style and the sophisticated essay combine to form a volume which will primarily appeal to adults. This version of Vance's story is not out of the comfort zone of high school students, but will find its core audience with older readers. Reviewer: Raina Sedore

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781596433670
Publisher:
First Second
Publication date:
05/22/2012
Pages:
128
Product dimensions:
5.90(w) x 8.40(h) x 0.40(d)
Lexile:
620L (what's this?)

Meet the Author

Jack Vance, born John Holbrook Vance in 1916, was one of the greatest masters of fantasy and science fiction. He was the winner of many awards for his work and career: the Damon Knight Memorial Grand Master Award from the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America, and the World Fantasy Award for Life Achievement. Among his awards for particular works were the Hugo award in 1963 for The Dragon Masters, in 1967 for The Last Castle, and in 2010 for his memoir This is Me, Jack Vance! He won a Nebula Award in 1966 for The Last Castle. He won the World Fantasy Award for Best Novel in 1990 for Lyonesse: Madouc. . He also won an Edgar for the best first mystery novel in 1961 for The Man in the Cage.

Vance published more than 60 books in his long career, sometimes under pseudonyms. Among them were 11 mystery novels, three of them as Ellery Queen. He wrote some of the first, and perhaps best, examples of "planetary adventures", including a novel called Big Planet. His "Dying Earth" series were among the most influential fantasy novels ever written, inspiring both generations of writers, and the creators of Dungeons and Dragons.

Vance's series from Tor include The Demon Princes, The Cadwal Chronicles, The Dying Earth, The Planet of Adventure, and Alastor. Vance's last novels were a series of two: Ports of Call and Lurulu.

Jack Vance was a sailor, a writer, an adventurer, a music critic, and a raconteur. He died in May 2013.

Humayoun Ibrahim lives in Brooklyn, New York. The Moon Moth is his first graphic novel.

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