The Moral Property of Women: A History of Birth Control Politics in America / Edition 3

Paperback (Print)
Used and New from Other Sellers
Used and New from Other Sellers
from $17.80
Usually ships in 1-2 business days
(Save 31%)
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (7) from $17.80   
  • New (5) from $23.94   
  • Used (2) from $17.80   

Overview

Choice Magazine's Outstanding Academic Books for 2004The only book to cover the entire history of birth control and the intense controversies about reproduction rights that have raged in the United States for more than 150 years, The Moral Property of Women is a thoroughly updated and revised version of the award-winning historian Linda Gordon's classic history Woman's Body, Woman's Right, originally published in 1976.

Arguing that reproduction control has always been central to women's status, The Moral Property of Women shows how opposition to it has long been part of the conservative opposition to gender equality. From its roots in folk medicine and in a campaign so broad it constituted a grassroots social movement at some points in history, to its legitimization through public policy, the widespread acceptance of birth control has involved a major reorientation of sexual values.

Gordon puts today's reproduction control controversies--foreign aid for family planning, the abortion debates, teenage pregnancy and childbearing, stem-cell research--into historical perspective and shows how the campaign to legalize abortion is part of a 150-year-old struggle over reproductive rights, a struggle that has followed a circuitous path. Beginning with the "folk medicine" of birth control, Gordon discusses how the backlash against the first women's rights movement of the 1800s prohibited both abortion and contraception about 130 years ago. She traces the campaign for legal reproduction control from the 1870s to the present and argues that attitudes toward birth control have been inseparable from family values, especially standards about sexuality and gender equality.

Highlighting both leaders and followers in the struggle, The Moral Property of Women chronicles the contributions of well-known reproduction control pioneers such as Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Margaret Sanger, and Emma Goldman, as well as lesser- known campaigners including the utopian socialist Robert Dale Owen, the three doctors Foote--Edward Bliss Foote, Edward Bond Foote, and Mary Bond Foote--the civil libertarian Mary Ware Dennett, and the daring Jane project of the 1970s, in which Chicago women's liberation activists performed illegal abortions.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
Praise for earlier editions: 
"A major contribution to the history that feminists must know if we are not to repeat it." -- Adrienne Rich

Praise for earlier editions: 
"[Gordon's] analyses are novel, insightful, and provocative." -- Choice

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780252074592
  • Publisher: University of Illinois Press
  • Publication date: 3/28/2007
  • Edition description: ANN
  • Edition number: 3
  • Pages: 464
  • Sales rank: 824,282
  • Product dimensions: 6.00 (w) x 9.25 (h) x 1.20 (d)

Meet the Author

Linda Gordon, a professor of history at New York University, is the author of numerous books, including Pitied but Not Entitled: Single Mothers and the History of Welfare, 1890-1935, and The Great Arizona Orphan Abduction, which won the Bancroft Prize and the Beveridge Prize.
Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Preface
Acknowledgments
Introduction: Birth Control, the Moral Property of Women 1
Pt. 1 From Folk Medicine to Prohibition to Resistance
1 The Prehistory of Birth Control 7
2 The Criminals 22
3 Prudent Sex 38
Pt. 2 Birth Control and Women's Rights
4 Voluntary Motherhood 55
5 Social Purity and Eugenics 72
6 Race Suicide 86
7 Continence or Indulgence 105
8 Birth Control and Social Revolution 125
Pt. 3 From Women's Rights to Family Planning
9 Professionalization 171
10 Depression 211
11 Planned Parenthood 242
12 Birth Control Becomes Public Policy 279
Pt. 4 Birth Control in the Era of Second-Wave Feminism
13 Abortion, the Mother Controversy 295
14 Is Nothing Simple about Reproduction Control? 321
Conclusion: Birth Control and Feminism 357
App Selected Recent Scholarship on the History of Reproduction Control 365
Notes 367
Index 431
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 5
( 1 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(1)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 24, 2013

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)