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The More We Know: NBC News, Educational Innovation, and Learning from Failure

Overview

In 2006, young people were flocking to MySpace, discovering the joys of watching videos of cute animals on YouTube, and playing online games. Not many of them were watching network news on television; they got most of their information online. So when NBC and MIT launched iCue, an interactive learning venture that combined social networking, online video, and gaming in one multimedia educational site, it was perfectly in tune with the times. iCue was a surefire way for NBC to reach younger viewers and for MIT to ...

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The More We Know: NBC News, Educational Innovation, and Learning from Failure

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Overview

In 2006, young people were flocking to MySpace, discovering the joys of watching videos of cute animals on YouTube, and playing online games. Not many of them were watching network news on television; they got most of their information online. So when NBC and MIT launched iCue, an interactive learning venture that combined social networking, online video, and gaming in one multimedia educational site, it was perfectly in tune with the times. iCue was a surefire way for NBC to reach younger viewers and for MIT to test innovative educational methods in the real world. But iCue was a failure: it never developed an audience and was canceled as if it were a sitcom with bad ratings. In The More We Know, Eric
Klopfer and Jason Haas, both part of the MIT development team, describe the rise and fall of iCue and what it can teach us about new media, old media, education, and the challenges of innovating in educational media. Klopfer and Haas show that iCue was hampered by, among other things, an educational establishment focused on
"teaching to the test," television producers uncomfortable with participatory media, and confusion about the market. But this is not just a cautionary tale; sometimes more can be learned from an interesting failure than a string of successes. Today's educational technology visionaries (iPads for everyone!) might keep this lesson in mind.

The MIT Press

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What People Are Saying

From the Publisher

" The More We Know is both a page turner and a crucial cautionary tale for reformers in the digital world. Any and all would-be reformers be warned: read this book. For all the rest, the book is a delicious insider's tale."--James Paul Gee, Mary Lou Fulton
Presidential Professor of Literacy Studies, Arizona State Universit

The MIT Press

"This intriguing case study provides important insights into how academic and business partnerships function in order to improve education through new media. Highly recommended for entrepreneurs launching startups based on learning technologies."--Chris Dede, Timothy E. Wirth Professor in
Learning Technologies, Harvard University

The MIT Press

"For new educational technologies to be both innovative and successful, they must challenge deeply-entrenched classroom traditions while also meeting the needs of students and teachers. The More We Know
illustrates how difficult it is to accomplish both--and provides lessons for those who (I hope) will continue to try."--Mitchel Resnick, LEGO
Papert Professor of Learning Research, MIT Media Lab

The MIT Press

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780262017947
  • Publisher: MIT Press
  • Publication date: 9/30/2012
  • Pages: 232
  • Sales rank: 1,410,481
  • Product dimensions: 9.00 (w) x 7.10 (h) x 0.90 (d)

Meet the Author

Eric Klopfer is Associate Professor of Science Education at MIT, Director of MIT's
Scheller Teacher Education Program (STEP), President of Learning Games Network, and author of Augmented Learning: Research and Design of Mobile Educational
Games
(MIT Press).

Jason Haas is a game designer and a graduate student at the MIT Media Lab.

Henry Jenkins is Provost's Professor of Communication, Journalism and Cinematic
Arts at the Annenberg School for Communication, University of Southern California.
He is the coeditor of From Barbie to Mortal Kombat: Gender and Computer
Games
(MIT Press, 1998).

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Table of Contents

Foreword Henry Jenkins vii

Preface xv

Acknowledgments xix

1 Media Education for the Twenty-First Century 1

2 The Education Arcade 9

3 An Education Revolution 21

4 Due Diligence 41

5 The Skunkworks 53

6 Television Dollars and Digital Pennies 71

7 Ever More Desperate Attempts 83

8 The Hype 95

9 What's Your iCue? 107

10 iCue Reality 129

11 What Next? 151

12 What If? 169

13 The More We Know 179

References 191

Index 197

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