The Mouth That Begs: Hunger, Cannibalism, and the Politics of Eating in Modern China

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The Chinese ideogram chi is far richer in connotation than the equivalent English verb “to eat.” Chi can also be read as “the mouth that begs for food and words.” A concept manifest in the twentieth-century Chinese political reality of revolution and massacre, chi suggests a narrative of desire that moves from lack to satiation and back again. In China such fundamental acts as eating or refusing to eat can carry enormous symbolic weight. This book examines the twentieth-century Chinese political experience as it ...

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The Mouth That Begs: Hunger, Cannibalism, and the Politics of Eating in Modern China

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Overview

The Chinese ideogram chi is far richer in connotation than the equivalent English verb “to eat.” Chi can also be read as “the mouth that begs for food and words.” A concept manifest in the twentieth-century Chinese political reality of revolution and massacre, chi suggests a narrative of desire that moves from lack to satiation and back again. In China such fundamental acts as eating or refusing to eat can carry enormous symbolic weight. This book examines the twentieth-century Chinese political experience as it is represented in literature through hunger, cooking, eating, and cannibalizing. At the core of Gang Yue’s argument lies the premise that the discourse surrounding the most universal of basic human acts—eating—is a culturally specific one.
Yue’s discussion begins with a brief look at ancient Chinese alimentary writing and then moves on to its main concern: the exploration and textual analysis of themes of eating in modern Chinese literature from the May Fourth period through the post-Tiananmen era. The broad historical scope of this volume illustrates how widely applicable eating-related metaphors can be. For instance, Yue shows how cannibalism symbolizes old China under European colonization in the writing of Lu Xun. In Mo Yan’s 1992 novel Liquorland, however, cannibalism becomes the symbol of overindulgent consumerism. Yue considers other writers as well, such as Shen Congwen, Wang Ruowang, Lu Wenfu, Zhang Zianliang, Ah Cheng, Zheng Yi, and Liu Zhenyun. A special section devoted to women writers includes a chapter on Xiao Hong, Wang Anyi, and Li Ang, and another on the Chinese-American women writers Jade Snow Wong, Maxine Hong Kingston, and Amy Tan. Throughout, the author compares and contrasts the work of these writers with similarly themed Western literature, weaving a personal and political semiotics of eating.
The Mouth That Begs will interest sinologists, literary critics, anthropologists, cultural studies scholars, and everyone curious about the semiotics of food.

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
“A very provocative view of the way modern Chinese practice, imagine, and politicize food culture and alimentary discourse. Instead of paying only lip service to materiality, Yue truly grapples with the material aspect of Chinese modernity.”—David Wang, author of Fictional Realism in Modern China: Mao Dun, Lao She, Shen Congwen

“Eating is certainly one of the great cultural metaphors in China, past and present. The Mouth That Begs is magnificent—sophisticated in writing and original in approach and interpretation. A most brilliant work indeed.”—Leo Ou-fan Lee, Harvard University

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780822323419
  • Publisher: Duke University Press Books
  • Publication date: 7/28/1999
  • Series: Post-Contemporary Interventions Series
  • Pages: 464
  • Product dimensions: 6.10 (w) x 8.96 (h) x 1.44 (d)

Meet the Author

Gang Yue is Assistant Professor of Chinese at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

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Table of Contents

Acknowledgments
Introduction 1
1 Discoursing Food: Some Notes toward a Semiotic of Eating in Ancient China 30
I The Social Embodiment of Modernity 61
2 Lu Xun and Cannibalism 67
3 Shen Congwen's "Modest Proposal" 101
II Writing Hunger: From Mao to the Dao 145
4 Hunger Revolution and Revolutionary Hunger 150
5 Postrevolutionary Leftovers: Zhang Xianliang and Ah Cheng 184
III The Return of Cannibalism after Tiananmen, or Red Monument in a Latrine Pit 222
6 Monument Revisited: Zheng Yi and Liu Zhenyun 228
7 From Cannibalism to Carnivorism: Mo Yan's Liquorland 262
IV Sampling of Variety: Gender and Cross-Cultural Perspectives 289
8 Embodied Spaces of Home: Xiao Hong, Wang Anyi, and Li Ang 293
9 Blending Chinese in America: Maxine Hong Kingston, Jade Snow Wong, and Amy Tan 331
Conclusion 372
Notes 383
Glossary 407
Bibliography 419
Index 435
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