Muffs

The Muffs

by The Muffs
     
 

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Kim Shattuck spent five years playing bass with the Pandoras before she left and formed a band of her own, and as a result the 1993 debut album from the Muffs is a bit like Shattuck's pop-punk version of George Harrison's All Things Must Pass<

Overview

Kim Shattuck spent five years playing bass with the Pandoras before she left and formed a band of her own, and as a result the 1993 debut album from the Muffs is a bit like Shattuck's pop-punk version of George Harrison's All Things Must Pass -- having spent years piling up demos for worthwhile songs that didn't have a home, Shattuck and her bandmates had plenty of winners to choose from, and though the Muffs could more than deliver the goods, it's the consistent quality of the tunes that really made this album click. The punky, downstroked guitars of Shattuck and Melanie Vammen and the crash-and-bash rhythms of bassist Ronnie Barnett and drummer Criss Crass were the perfect vehicle for Shattuck's songs, but it's the irresistible melodic hooks of "Eye to Eye," "Lucky Guy," "From Your Girl," and "Every Single Thing" that elevated The Muffs from good pop-centric punk (or punk-centric pop) to something that truly stood out. Shattuck also proved to be an astute and skillful lyricist, with a strong witty streak and a punk gal's snarky sensibility, but her take on relationships on The Muffs is significantly more articulate and heartfelt than nearly any of her peers -- it's hard to imagine someone delivering two breakup songs that hit their target as well as "Saying Goodbye" and "All for Nothing" while taking such strikingly different approaches, and it takes courage to wrap a song about stalking around a melody and guitar hook as addictive as "Everywhere I Go." The production by Rob Cavallo and David Katznelson is just a bit indulgent -- the album could have played better without the Korla Pandit organ interlude, the goofy wind effects track, or the 31-second Angry Samoans cover -- but they get the sound of this band down beautifully, and given how closely Cavallo would follow the template of these sessions on Green Day's Dookie the following year, one wonders if a few of these tunes could have been radio hits if Billie Joe and his pals had gotten there first and greased the wheels for an album of similarly hooky punk tunes. Time has been kind to The Muffs, and more than 20 years after its initial release, it sounds like one of the best and brightest albums to emerge from the '90s pop-punk explosion. [In 2015, Omnivore Records gave The Muffs an expanded and remastered reissue that included alternate versions of "Lucky Guy" and "Everywhere I Go" as well as eight unreleased solo demos recorded by Shattuck. The new master gives the album a more full-bodied sound, and the liner notes by Barnett and Shattuck lend a valuable perspective on how the album (and the band) came to be. While the demos are also available as a digital EP, the improved audio does make this a worthy purchase for those who still dig physical product.]

Product Details

Release Date:
08/14/2015
Label:
Omnivore Recordings
UPC:
0816651015184
catalogNumber:
101518
Rank:
39931

Related Subjects

Tracks

Album Credits

Performance Credits

Muffs   Primary Artist
Kim Shattuck   Guitar,Vocals
Ronnie Barnett   Electric Bass,Vocals
Jon Spencer   Hammond Organ,Guest Appearance
Melanie Vammen   Rhythm Guitar
Criss Crass   Percussion,Cymbals,Drums,Vocal Harmony
Theremin Korla Pandit   Hammond Organ,Guest Appearance

Technical Credits

Muffs   Producer,Reissue Producer
Greg Allen   Reissue Producer,Reissue Design
Rob Cavallo   Producer
Kim Shattuck   Composer,Engineer,Liner Notes,Instrumentation
Ronnie Barnett   Composer,Liner Notes
Tom Recchion   Art Direction
Metal Mike Chlasciak   Composer
Melanie Vammen   Composer
David Katznelson   Producer
Brian Kehew   Engineer
Mark Hafer   Engineer

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