The Mummy's Mother

Overview


Popular author Tony Johnston's second novel follows a mummy boy from the pyramids of Egypt to a famous museum in New York City as he searches for his mummy mom in this clever, funny book.

A young mummy boy named Ramose is awakened one day by the sound of graverobbers invading his home--the pharoah's tomb. They've stolen his mother (who's also a mummy) and now it's up to Ramose to find her. With the help of a cranky talking camel and some young American tourists, Ramose finds ...

See more details below
Available through our Marketplace sellers and in stores.

Pick Up In Store Near You

Reserve and pick up in 60 minutes at your local store

Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (14) from $1.99   
  • New (6) from $4.10   
  • Used (8) from $1.99   
Close
Sort by
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Note: Marketplace items are not eligible for any BN.com coupons and promotions
$4.10
Seller since 2014

Feedback rating:

(45)

Condition:

New — never opened or used in original packaging.

Like New — packaging may have been opened. A "Like New" item is suitable to give as a gift.

Very Good — may have minor signs of wear on packaging but item works perfectly and has no damage.

Good — item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Acceptable — item is in working order but may show signs of wear such as scratches or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Used — An item that has been opened and may show signs of wear. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Refurbished — A used item that has been renewed or updated and verified to be in proper working condition. Not necessarily completed by the original manufacturer.

New
2003 Hardcover A brand-new, unused, unready copy. American Classroom Libraries has over 30, 000 childrens books in stock. We Ship Daily!

Ships from: Simi Valley, CA

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$4.49
Seller since 2015

Feedback rating:

(143)

Condition: New
0439324629

Ships from: North Dartmouth, MA

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$7.00
Seller since 2006

Feedback rating:

(217)

Condition: New
E Rutherford, New Jersey, U.S.A. 2003 Hardcover New in New jacket

Ships from: canyon lake, CA

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$8.00
Seller since 2006

Feedback rating:

(217)

Condition: New
E Rutherford, New Jersey, U.S.A. 2003 Hardcover New in New jacket

Ships from: canyon lake, CA

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$8.00
Seller since 2006

Feedback rating:

(217)

Condition: New
E Rutherford, New Jersey, U.S.A. 2003 Hardcover New in New jacket

Ships from: canyon lake, CA

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$86.18
Seller since 2008

Feedback rating:

(210)

Condition: New

Ships from: Chicago, IL

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Close
Sort by
Note: Kids' Club Eligible. See More Details.
Sending request ...

Overview


Popular author Tony Johnston's second novel follows a mummy boy from the pyramids of Egypt to a famous museum in New York City as he searches for his mummy mom in this clever, funny book.

A young mummy boy named Ramose is awakened one day by the sound of graverobbers invading his home--the pharoah's tomb. They've stolen his mother (who's also a mummy) and now it's up to Ramose to find her. With the help of a cranky talking camel and some young American tourists, Ramose finds himself en route to NYC--home of an important museum and its famous collection of mummies. Full of offbeat, witty scenes, this is a fresh and original novel with great appeal.
Johnston's ANY SMALL GOODNESS also recently received the Judy Lopez Honor Book Award.

When his mother is stolen from her tomb, Ramose, a 4000-year-old mummy, tries to find her in the Egyptian desert, aboard an ocean liner, and in New York City's Metropolitan Museum.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

School Library Journal
(October 1, 2003; 0-439-32462-9)

Gr 4-6-Meet Ramose, 4000-year-old boy mummy. His mother has just been stolen by grave robbers, and he is determined to find her. He leaves his sacred tomb, finds a talking camel, and is off on the grandest adventure of his "life." He arrives at the port city to see his mother being taken aboard a cruise ship, follows her on board, meets up with a group of rich boarding-school boys on a trip to Egypt, and makes friends. They agree to help Ramose find his mother, if he will win the Ping-Pong tournament for them. The story progresses in this silly manner, leading the protagonist to New York City and the museum where his mother is held captive. A daring rescue involving pigeons rounds out this unusual tale. Johnston has managed to make Ramose fit in, even though he is a mummy covered in rags, creating an interesting and likable character. Using wordplay and Ramose's misunderstanding of the modern world, the book is more outlandish than funny, but may appeal to a fourth-grader's sense of humor. Light and fluffy, this story might be just the ticket for reluctant readers.-Angela J. Reynolds, Washington County Cooperative Library Services, Hillsboro, OR Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information.

Publishers Weekly
Johnston's (Any Small Goodness: A Novel of the Barrio) loopy tale opens in the Egyptian desert, where Ramose, the 4000-year-old mummy of a boy who died of the plague when he was 10, listens helplessly as grave robbers steal his mummified mother from her tomb. His outrage gives Ramose the ability to move again ("without analyzing exactly how") and, determined to rescue her, he hops on the back of a camel. Remembering that one of the thieves has said, "Those museum boys are waiting in port," Ramose steers the camel toward the sea, in "hot pursuit of his mother. The hottest pursuit imaginable, for the eye of the sun glared down upon him most wickedly." Thus begins a series of misadventures, which lead Ramose and his mummy mother to Manhattan. There a talking pigeon masterminds the young mummy's liberation of his mother from the museum in which she is displayed. The 4000-year-old boy's observations of the mores of the modern world include some comical utterances, but in general Johnston overloads her narrative with groan-inducing puns and obvious wordplay (e.g., the camel and the pigeon respectively tell Ramose, "Don't get all unraveled"). Egyptology fans will likely be disappointed with the plotting, which tends to be more inane than whimsical. Ages 9-up. (Oct.) Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information.
Children's Literature
The four thousand-year old mummy of a ten-year-old boy goes in search of his mummified mother after she is stolen from their tomb by grave robbers. He crosses the desert on a talking camel, finds his way onto an ocean liner, navigates the streets of New York with the help of a talking pigeon, and finally, aided by a group of school children, rescues his mother from a museum. This is the kind of story that could be delightfully silly. Unfortunately it is not. The characters are one-dimensional, clichéd and generally unlikable. The dialogue is wooden. And the writing style, which is probably meant to evoke ancient times with its formal sentence structure and old-fashioned language, simply comes off as forced and clumsy: "The words just blurted forth...He slid down with haste...Everybody bellowed Gerald's ditty and cavorted like fools." Children certainly will not learn anything about ancient Egypt from this book and it is doubtful that they'll find much enjoyment in reading it. 2003, The Blue Sky Press/Scholastic, Ages 9 to 11.
— Barbara Carroll Roberts
School Library Journal
Gr 4-6-Meet Ramose, 4000-year-old boy mummy. His mother has just been stolen by grave robbers, and he is determined to find her. He leaves his sacred tomb, finds a talking camel, and is off on the grandest adventure of his "life." He arrives at the port city to see his mother being taken aboard a cruise ship, follows her on board, meets up with a group of rich boarding-school boys on a trip to Egypt, and makes friends. They agree to help Ramose find his mother, if he will win the Ping-Pong tournament for them. The story progresses in this silly manner, leading the protagonist to New York City and the museum where his mother is held captive. A daring rescue involving pigeons rounds out this unusual tale. Johnston has managed to make Ramose fit in, even though he is a mummy covered in rags, creating an interesting and likable character. Using wordplay and Ramose's misunderstanding of the modern world, the book is more outlandish than funny, but may appeal to a fourth-grader's sense of humor. Light and fluffy, this story might be just the ticket for reluctant readers.-Angela J. Reynolds, Washington County Cooperative Library Services, Hillsboro, OR Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
When grave robbers break into their shared tomb to carry away his mother's sarcophagus, it's young 4,010-year-old Ramose to the rescue in this decidedly offbeat tale. Despite having no physical guts or brains, Ramose follows his mother across the Egyptian desert to an ocean liner bound for New York, then across Manhattan to the museum where she's been placed on exhibit. Luckily, he gets plenty of help, from a bad-tempered camel and a group of friendly students to a loyal pigeon named Vinny-and having caught a horror movie along the way ("Mummies do not curse anything! They just rest a lot!"), he knows just how to clear out the museum when it's time to spring his parent. Johnston doesn't expend much effort on internal logic, and she leaves well-wrapped mother and child stranded in Central Park, but Ramose's physical limitations and stubborn determination make him a sympathetic character, and readers susceptible to the absurdity of it all will be heartily amused. (Fiction. 10-12)
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780439324625
  • Publisher: Scholastic, Inc.
  • Publication date: 10/1/2003
  • Pages: 160
  • Age range: 8 - 12 Years
  • Lexile: 530L (what's this?)
  • Product dimensions: 5.74 (w) x 8.58 (h) x 0.66 (d)

Meet the Author


Tony Johnston is the author of nearly 100 picture books and early readers, including The Iguana Brothers, illustrated by Mark Teague. Her first novel, Any Small Goodness: A Novel of the Barrio, was named an NCTE Notable Children's Book in the Language Arts, an IRA Notable Book for a Global Security, and a Judy Lopez Memorial Honor Book. It was also awarded the first annual Southern California Booksellers' Association Children's Book Award. Ms. Johnston lives in California with her husband.
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)