The Name of God Is Mercy

The Name of God Is Mercy

4.3 12
by Pope Francis
     
 

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NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER • In his first book published as Pope, and in conjunction with the Extraordinary Jubilee of Mercy, Pope Francis here invites all humanity to an intimate and personal dialogue on the subject closest to his heart—mercy—which has long been the cornerstone of his faith and is now the central teaching

Overview

NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER • In his first book published as Pope, and in conjunction with the Extraordinary Jubilee of Mercy, Pope Francis here invites all humanity to an intimate and personal dialogue on the subject closest to his heart—mercy—which has long been the cornerstone of his faith and is now the central teaching of his papacy.

In this conversation with Vatican reporter Andrea Tornielli, Francis explains—through memories from his youth and moving anecdotes from his experiences as a pastor—why “mercy is the first attribute of God.” God “does not want anyone to be lost. His mercy is infinitely greater than our sins,” he writes. As well, the Church cannot close the door on anyone, Francis asserts—on the contrary, its duty is to go out into the world to find its way into the consciousness of people so that they can assume responsibility for, and move away from, the bad things they have done.

The first Jesuit and the first South American to be elected Bishop of Rome, Pope Francis has traveled around the world spreading God’s message of mercy to the largest crowds in papal history. Clear and profound, The Name of God Is Mercy resonates with this desire to reach all those who are looking for meaning in life, a road to peace and reconciliation, and the healing of physical and spiritual wounds. It is being published in more than eighty countries around the world.

“The name of God is mercy. There are no situations we cannot get out of, we are not condemned to sink into quicksand.”—Pope Francis

Praise for The Name of God Is Mercy

“Francis speaks succinctly—and with refreshing forthrightness. . . . He emphasizes moral sincerity over dogma, an understanding of the complexities of the world and individual experience over rigid doctrine. . . . The pope has an easy conversational style that moves effortlessly between folksy sayings and erudite allusions, between common-sense logic and impassioned philosophical insights.”—Michiko Kakutani, The New York Times

“What makes his book most moving is the way in which this man, without disrespecting his own privacy or offering false bromides of modesty, opens the sacred space of his conscience to explain how he came to center his ministry, and now his papacy, around mercy.”—James Carroll, The New Yorker

“As he has done throughout his papacy, Pope Francis shows in this book a compelling way to present God’s love anew to a skeptical world without denying the ancient teachings of faith. But now he is challenging the entire Church to trek a new way forward.”Time

“Francis enjoys sharing personal stories of God’s grace and mercy in the lives of parishioners from his native Argentina, people he has known and who have recognized themselves as sinners.”The Washington Post

“Powerful . . . Francis’s book signals a plea for a change of attitude on the part of the faithful and their pastors. . . . Bishops and priests will talk and quarrel over the text for months, even years to come. And that, perhaps, is what Francis intends.”Financial Times

“Deepens his calls for a more merciful Catholic Church . . . The question-and-answer book is told in simple, breezy language, with the pope referring to experiences and people in his own life.”Newsday

“Francis has offered his most detailed outline yet for the role of the Catholic church in the modern era.”National Catholic Reporter

Translated by Oonagh Stransky 

Editorial Reviews

The New York Times - Michiko Kakutani
[The] gift for teaching—along with his inclusive vision of the world, and his warm, embracing manner—have been hallmarks of the pope's whirlwind tenure thus far in the Vatican, and they also inform his new book…In The Name of God Is Mercy, Francis speaks succinctly—and with refreshing forthrightness…chastising "scholars of the law" who "live attached to the letter of the law but who neglect love; men who only know how to close doors and draw boundaries." Instead, he urges people to think of the church as "a field hospital, where treatment is given above all to those who are most wounded." Often speaking here more as a pastor than as the vicar of Christ, he emphasizes moral sincerity over dogma, an understanding of the complexities of the world and individual experience over rigid doctrine…The pope has an easy conversational style that moves effortlessly between folksy sayings and erudite allusions, between common-sense logic and impassioned philosophical insights.
Publishers Weekly
02/01/2016
Pope Francis proclaimed 2016 "the extraordinary jubilee year of mercy"; in this small, persuasive book, he explains that "we need constantly to contemplate the mystery of mercy." The first two-thirds consists of questions posed by Andrea Tornielli, a Vatican journalist, and answered by Francis. Tornielli's questions range in tone from catechism ("Why are we sinners?") to eliciting Francis's personal and pastoral experiences, as well as questions that clarify his theology and vision for the Roman Catholic Church. Pope Francis quotes saints, Scripture, and his papal forefathers in the beautiful book, with endpapers that repeat the title in many languages. The pope briefly addresses homosexuality and the ecumenism of mercy throughout the world's religions; he more fully considers mercy in relation to compassion, scholarship, confession, and justice, juxtaposing mercy and corruption most profoundly. The last third of the book presents his proclamation about the year of mercy, delivered in March of 2015, in all its poetry, clarity, and appeal: "Let us live this jubilee intensely..." (Jan.)
From the Publisher
“In The Name of God Is Mercy, Francis speaks succinctly—and with refreshing forthrightness. . . . He emphasizes moral sincerity over dogma, an understanding of the complexities of the world and individual experience over rigid doctrine. . . . The pope has an easy conversational style that moves effortlessly between folksy sayings and erudite allusions, between common-sense logic and impassioned philosophical insights.”—Michiko Kakutani, The New York Times
 
“A book on mercy might be expected to be a warm bath in kindliness, all sweetness and light, but Pope Francis, in The Name of God Is Mercy, offers a tough-minded reflection on an urgently needed public virtue, together with firm, if kindly, pushback against his critics. . . . What makes his book most moving is the way in which this man, without disrespecting his own privacy or offering false bromides of modesty, opens the sacred space of his conscience to explain how he came to center his ministry, and now his papacy, around mercy. . . . His new book comes out toward the start of the Extraordinary Jubilee of Mercy, which he inaugurated in December, in a centuries-old ritual, by unlocking the ceremonial Holy Door of St. Peter’s Basilica. The Church of which Jorge Mario Bergoglio became Pope, nearly three years ago, was itself a locked door. As Francis, he has, exactly, found a ‘tiny opening.’ He is pushing, and, to universal surprise, the door is beginning to swing open.”—James Carroll, The New Yorker

“As he has done throughout his papacy, Pope Francis shows in this book a compelling way to present God’s love anew to a skeptical world without denying the ancient teachings of faith. But now he is challenging the entire Church to trek a new way forward. Francis wants us to focus our energy on the 99% who need to experience once more the greatest realities of our faith.”Time
 
The Name of God Is Mercy reminds me of John Paul II’s 1994 book, Crossing the Threshold of Hope. . . . But while John Paul II relied on Gospel passages, theological scholars and past papal pronouncements, Francis enjoys sharing personal stories of God’s grace and mercy in the lives of parishioners from his native Argentina, people he has known and who have recognized themselves as sinners.”The Washington Post

“Powerful . . . Francis’s book signals a plea for a change of attitude on the part of the faithful and their pastors. . . . Bishops and priests will talk and quarrel over the text for months, even years to come. And that, perhaps, is what Francis intends: a disruption of the status quo; a call for open-ended discussion about conscience, and sin, based on new priorities. He has started the conversation by setting compassion for the poor, oppressed and deprived of the world above casuistic rule-keeping.”Financial Times
 
“Pope Francis lays out his case for emphasizing the merciful face of the Catholic Church in his first book as pontiff, saying God never tires of forgiving and actually prefers the sinners who repent over self-righteous moralizers who don’t.”—Associated Press
 
“[Pope Francis] deepens his calls for a more merciful Catholic Church. . . . The question-and-answer book is told in simple, breezy language, with the pope referring to experiences and people in his own life including a niece and prisoners he has visited.”Newsday

“Pope Francis has offered his most detailed outline yet for the role of the Catholic church in the modern era, saying in a new book-length interview the church needs to follow Jesus’ example more closely. . . . ‘At times I have surprised myself by thinking that a few very rigid people would do well to slip a little, so that they could remember that they are sinners and thus meet Jesus,’ Francis states.”National Catholic Reporter

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780399588631
Publisher:
Random House Publishing Group
Publication date:
01/12/2016
Pages:
176
Sales rank:
14,714
Product dimensions:
5.40(w) x 7.80(h) x 0.70(d)

Meet the Author

Pope Francis
Jorge Mario Bergoglio was born in Buenos Aires on December 17, 1936. On March 13, 2013, he became the Bishop of Rome and the 266th Pope of the Catholic Church. On March 13, 2015, he announced his Holy Year of Mercy, which will begin on December 8, 2015, and end on November 20, 2016.
 
Andrea Tornielli is a veteran Vatican reporter, correspondent for La Stampa, and director of the Vatican Insider website. He also writes for a variety of Italian and international magazines. His publications include the first biography of the Pope, Francis: Pope of a New World, which was translated into sixteen languages, and This Economy Kills: Pope Francis on Capitalism and Social Justice, which was translated into nine languages.

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The Name of God Is Mercy 4.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 12 reviews.
Camille Harper More than 1 year ago
Also, this is a book for those that might have lost their way. This book inspired me to return to church this past Sunday. I am learning that the church is not a museum for the good people, but a safe haven also for the broken. I also recommend that people read another amazing book called When God Stopped Keeping Score. It is about the power of God and forgiveness. I read it after my husband left me after a 30 year marriage. That book restored my faith in myself and it taught me how to forgive the one person that needed it the most--me. I hope that both books will help you as well.
Sandy5 More than 1 year ago
I didn’t know what to expect from this book but I knew that I wanted to read it. The book is a question and answer book as the Pope answers questions posed to him by a Vatican reporter and his answers are spoken using everyday language with experiences relating to his childhood, religious doctrine and his current life. I found reading this book relaxing and powerful as I would relate to the many things that he spoke about. Mercy is the word that is repeated continuously and is an important message the Pope feels God brings to us. The Pope is a humble person and he knows he is sinner for we all have sinned. I like that he does not set himself apart from everyone but that he is among us and walks the journey with us. The Pope talks about opening ourselves up to receive God’s forgiveness for our sins and receive his mercy. For being conscious of our sins, and asking for forgiveness, this pleases God even if we must ask for forgiveness repeatedly. The Pope talks about how our society has lost our sense of sin and how we feel that are sins are incurable and unable to be forgiven. I felt this part of the book was fantastic. He continues this focus as these individuals continue to stray instead of asking for forgiveness and getting their life back on track. The Pope is a person with a message from God and God is a God of mercy, a God who is forgiving and not judgmental. For everyone makes mistakes, it’s your part of asking for forgiveness that helps you get back up.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Understanding mercy at its essence is difficult for us as sinners. Pope francis enlightens this truth and promised gift to all of us.
FrancescaFB More than 1 year ago
POWERFUL!! In THE NAME OF GOD IS MERCY, Pope Francis assures everyone that no matter how great or small our sins are, that God will bestow His mercy upon us. This book, Pope Francis’ first publication to the lay person, is written on an intimate and personal level. The Pope has reinforced my faith in that my Lord Jesus will always see me as the weak human, the sinner, who needs His mercy, forgiveness, compassion and understanding, which are at times beyond the confines of the Church. It is often a difficult struggle to live within our society and yet try to live the best Christian life we can, but Pope Francis gives us the guidance, counseling, and leadership we need to manage our lives, as well as the reassurance of Jesus’ eternal and unconditional love.
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NeensC More than 1 year ago
Marvelous read.