The Narration of Desire: Erotic Transferences and Countertransferences [NOOK Book]

Overview

In this richly woven study of the manifestations, meanings, and therapeutic uses of preoedipal erotic experience, Harriet Kimble Wrye and Judith Welles examine the very primitive longings for the mother's sensually experienced body that emerge in analysis. Such longings, by which the infant "spills" into the mother's body and shares her sensual pleasure, optimally become the basis for mature genital sexuality. In The Narration of Desire, however, Wrye and Welles focus on patients for whom early mothering did not ...
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The Narration of Desire: Erotic Transferences and Countertransferences

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Overview

In this richly woven study of the manifestations, meanings, and therapeutic uses of preoedipal erotic experience, Harriet Kimble Wrye and Judith Welles examine the very primitive longings for the mother's sensually experienced body that emerge in analysis. Such longings, by which the infant "spills" into the mother's body and shares her sensual pleasure, optimally become the basis for mature genital sexuality. In The Narration of Desire, however, Wrye and Welles focus on patients for whom early mothering did not sustain the flowering and subsequent transformation of early erotic desire. Such patients remain under the sway of a primitive eroticism that is often sadistic and invariably perverse. Successful analytic work thus becomes a complicated, often exhausting undertaking. It requires accepting and containing the patient's primitive erotic needs; reconstructing the mother infant narratives that sustain these needs; and mobilizing the patient's own transformative desire to grow out of maternal eroticism to a freer, less encumbered adult love of self and others. In illuminating the narrative process of analytic transformation Wrye and Welles concentrate on the emergence and resolution of maternal erotic transferences and countertransferences. The former represent the patient's intense longings for intimate physical contact with the analyst, often with a particular part of her body. Such transferences illuminate unconscious beliefs about the conditions for loving that these patients bring to treatment; as such, they frequently lead to a sense of deadlock and psychic paralysis for lengthy intervals of treatment. The complementary countertransferences signify the analyst's resistance to the patient's primitive erotic needs, which include the demand that the analyst be a sensually erotic maternal presence. And yet, Wrye and Welles argue, it is the acceptance and analytic working through of just such transferences and countertransferences that are transformative, po
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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"I believe that this work successfully addresses a very important issue in infant development, in psychoanalytic theory, and in clinical practice - the infant's sense of proper entitlement to an appropriate erotic launching of his or her career as a human being - and of its being candidly validated in the trial countersubjective response in that foremost of existential 'rewrites,' psychoanalysis itself."

- James S. Grotstein, M.D., American Journal of Psychotherapy

"With their candid and vividly detailed clinical accounts, Wrye and Welles illustrate how the coauthored story of transference/countertransference permit the rich history of a patient's love narrative to be retrieved and reviewed. The Narration of Desire is an intensely personal, highly instructive study of the erotic roots of conscious awareness."

- Owen Renik, M.D., San Francisco Psychoanalytic Institute

“I believe Wrye and Welles have made a major contribution to the field. They establish to an impressively detailed degree the necessity of attending to communications transmitted through bodily feelings and sensations, a topic only now fully coming into its own”

- Ethel Person, M.D., JAPA

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781135061609
  • Publisher: Taylor & Francis
  • Publication date: 4/15/2013
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 272
  • File size: 2 MB

Table of Contents

Introduction
1 Words and Stories in Narrative Space 1
2 When the Story Doesn't Flow 21
3 The Maternal Erotic Transference 33
4 The Maternal Erotic Countertransference 61
5 The Birth of Desire 89
6 Perverse Narratives: The Threat of New Narratives of Desire 105
7 A "Horrible Dry Hollow": Lost in Arid Deadspace 137
8 Erotic Terror in Men: Fear of the Early Maternal Erotic Transference 157
9 Where's Poppa? The Appearance of Paternal Transferences in the Face of Early Maternal Transferences 173
10 Oedipus and the Spruce Goose: A Narration of an Oedipal Transition 203
References 225
Index 232
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