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The Natanz Directive: A Jake Conlan Thriller

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Overview

A former operative in the CIA's most clandestine division is pulled back in to help prevent Armageddon in the Middle East

An unexpected phone call from the Pentagon propels “superpatriot” Jake Conlan back into the deadly world of international espionage and “black ops” he thought he had left behind him.

Jake is asked to mount an emergency, highly dangerous mission inside Iran. His mission: to develop intel ...

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The Natanz Directive: A Jake Conlan Thriller

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Overview

A former operative in the CIA's most clandestine division is pulled back in to help prevent Armageddon in the Middle East

An unexpected phone call from the Pentagon propels “superpatriot” Jake Conlan back into the deadly world of international espionage and “black ops” he thought he had left behind him.

Jake is asked to mount an emergency, highly dangerous mission inside Iran. His mission: to develop intel that can indisputably prove that Iran has nuclear-launch capabilities and bring down the current Iranian regime.

Traveling from Paris to Amsterdam and then undercover into Iran itself, Jake connects with the Iranian covert opposition only to discover there is a traitor on his team. With a ticking clock counting down, Jake has to risk his mission, and his life, to uncover the traitor, and stop an imminent attack on Israel, for it will be full-scale world war if he fails.

Fans of Alistair Maclean, Adam Hall, and Brad Thor will find themselves held hostage by The Natanz Directive, an action-packed thriller from former CIA agent Wayne Simmons and coauthor Mark Graham.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
A special operation to infiltrate Iran’s main nuclear facility at Natanz brings 25-year CIA vet Jake Conlan out of retirement in this timely thriller from former intelligence professional Simmons and coauthor Graham (The Fire Theft). After traveling undercover through Europe, Conlan parachutes into the countryside outside Tehran, and begins making contact with opposition leaders—and one old romantic flame—who help him reach the underground bomb factory. Once there, Conlan makes a code red discovery: the Iranians not only have 21 long-range nuclear missiles but they’re set to launch in three days at targets in Israel and several major European cities. Throughout, Graham’s prose and plotting matches his hero’s ways—brisk and no-nonsense—and Simmons’s contribution pays off in credible detail. Of particular note are the fine descriptions of Tehran and its people. Agent: Peter Rubie, FinePrint Literary Management. (Sept.)
From the Publisher
“Ian Fleming gave us James Bond. Robert Ludlum gave us Jason Bourne. Now authors Wayne Simmons and Mark Graham give us a novel with an unapologetically pro-American master of espionage, Jake Conlan. Not since Tom Clancy created Jack Ryan has a U.S. audience had such a compelling spy to root for.”

The Washington Times

“This book truly is AWESOME! Vince Flynn, John le Carré, and Tom Clancy best move to the side because the world just received a gift from a man who has ‘been there and done that.’”

Examiner

“A special operation to infiltrate Iran’s main nuclear facility at Natanz brings 25-year CIA vet Jake Conlan out of retirement in this timely thriller from former intelligence professional Simmons and coauthor Graham (The Fire Theft). After traveling undercover through Europe, Conlan parachutes into the countryside outside Tehran, and begins making contact with opposition leaders—and one old romantic flame—who help him reach the underground bomb factory. Once there, Conlan makes a code red discovery: the Iranians not only have 21 long-range nuclear missiles but they’re set to launch in three days at targets in Israel and several major European cities. Throughout, Graham’s prose and plotting matches his hero’s ways—brisk and no-nonsense—and Simmons’s contribution pays off in credible detail. Of particular note are the fine descriptions of Tehran and its people.”

Publishers Weekly

In Simmons’ and Graham’s (The Missing Sixth, 2011, etc.) spy thriller, Jake Conlan is called back undercover. 

Conlan’s past 50, but he’s no less lethal when set to task by his mentor, the mysterious Mr. Elliot. Word is Iran finally has the bomb and means of delivery, and Jake’s sent to stop The Twelvers, the messianic Shiite group in power, from using it. After a clandestine SR-71 flight to Paris, Jake is first tasked to clean up a minor mess. A drug dealer has his hooks in a weak-kneed U.S. senator serving on an intelligence committee. Jake plugs that leak with a Mauser pistol. Complications arise when it develops that the dealer had connections with Mujahedim-e Kahlq, an Iranian opposition group financing operations with edge-of-legal activities. Post-Paris action moves to Antwerp for a cinematic chase scene, then to Turkey, where a security breach means someone is an Iranian agent. Undercover ops like Jake need a plethora of tech tools to foil the evildoers plus help from a stalwart general back in D.C. Need to HALO jump (high altitude, low opening) into Iran? The U.S. Air Force routes a black-ops-modified C-17 to a remote airstrip in Turkey. Conlan’s primary weapon, however, seems to be his modified iPhone. GPS, encrypted communications, specialized apps—Conlan pulls it out more often than his Walther PPK. Once among the bad guys, Conlan leaves more than one Iranian shot or stabbed while he dodges from peril to peril like a frog hopping across burning lily pads. Under the noses of the mullahs, Conlan is aided by Charlie Amadi, who once skated around U.S. law and is now Iran’s premier contraband smuggler. Charlie’s beautiful cohort, Jeri, provides muscle as Conlan infiltrates, spies and iPhones-home vital information from Qom and Natanz. No worries. An hours-away three-pronged nuclear strike on Israel and the West promptly falls victim to assorted fighter-bombers and bunker-busters.

Ruthless and remorseless James Bond-ian escapades, sans skirt-chasing intervals, in the name of Western ideals.”

Kirkus Reviews

"The Natanz Directive is a first rate international thriller. The story of the CIA operative charged with penetrating Iran to discover and disrupt its nuclear activities is ripped from the headlines. It’s compelling, non-stop pacing leaves you gasping for breath. It’s a rare book that leaves you with a sense of satisfaction at the end, but this one does." 

—Harry MacLean, author of the Edgar award winning In Broad Daylight and The Past is Never Dead

The Natanz Directive is a world-class thriller with the world, in fact, hanging on the brink. Jake Conlan will remind you in flashes of Ethan Hunt or Jason Bourne, perhaps with a dollop of James Bond. But Conlan’s talents are unique and he tackles this ripped-from-the-headlines global crisis with both cunning and brawn. A gripping read.”

—Mark Stevens, author of Antler Dust and Buried on the Roan

"Wayne Simmons doesn't just write it. He's lived it, and that's why he and Mark Graham can tell this spy thriller in such an engrossing way."

—Donald Rumsfeld, former Secretary of Defense

“The authors bring to the page a bona fide hero and a story rich in plot and boundless energy. The story takes place in the most frightening country on earth, and yet it is the characters and how they deal with this turmoil that most capture our imagination.”

—Stephen Coonts, New York Times bestselling author of Deep Black

"The Natanz Directive is the story behind the international headline story. Wayne Simmons and Mark Graham will rivet you with a book that is high concept, high stakes, high octane, and most important for readers high reward."

—Stephen White, bestselling author of Line of Fire

Praise for Mark Graham:

"Along with a lot of other people, I have long been wondering who was going to inherit Robert Ludlum's crown as the new prince of international suspense. Mark Graham has strengthened his claim to the throne with his latest thriller. The characters are captivating, the story is powerful and topical, and the writing is literate and rich. A definite winner."

—Stephen White, New York Times bestselling author of The Last Lie and The Siege

Kirkus Reviews
In Simmons and Graham's (The Missing Sixth, 2011, etc.) spy thriller, Jake Conlan is called back undercover. Conlan's past 50, but he's no less lethal when set to task by his mentor, the mysterious Mr. Elliot. Word is Iran finally has the bomb and means of delivery, and Jake's sent to stop The Twelvers, the messianic Shiite group in power, from using it. After a clandestine SR-71 flight to Paris, Jake is first tasked to clean up a minor mess. A drug dealer has his hooks in a weak-kneed U.S. senator serving on an intelligence committee. Jake plugs that leak with a Mauser pistol. Complications arise when it develops that the dealer had connections with Mujahedim-e Kahlq, an Iranian opposition group financing operations with edge-of-legal activities. Post-Paris action moves to Antwerp for a cinematic chase scene, then to Turkey, where a security breach means someone is an Iranian agent. Undercover ops like Jake need a plethora of tech tools to foil the evildoers plus help from a stalwart general back in D.C. Need to HALO jump (high altitude, low opening) into Iran? The U.S. Air Force routes a black-ops-modified C-17 to a remote airstrip in Turkey. Conlan's primary weapon, however, seems to be his modified iPhone. GPS, encrypted communications, specialized apps--Conlan pulls it out more often than his Walther PPK. Once among the bad guys, Conlan leaves more than one Iranian shot or stabbed while he dodges from peril to peril like a frog hopping across burning lily pads. Under the noses of the mullahs, Conlan is aided by Charlie Amadi, who once skated around U.S. law and is now Iran's premier contraband smuggler. Charlie's beautiful cohort, Jeri, provides muscle as Conlan infiltrates, spies and iPhones-home vital information from Qom and Natanz. No worries. An hours-away three-pronged nuclear strike on Israel and the West promptly falls victim to assorted fighter-bombers and bunker-busters. Ruthless and remorseless James Bond-ian escapades, sans skirt-chasing intervals, in the name of Western ideals.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780312609320
  • Publisher: St. Martin's Press
  • Publication date: 9/18/2012
  • Series: Jake Conlan Series , #1
  • Pages: 304
  • Sales rank: 983,217
  • Product dimensions: 6.40 (w) x 9.30 (h) x 1.10 (d)

Meet the Author

WAYNE SIMMONS spent twenty-seven years as part of an Outside Paramilitary Special Operations Group for the CIA. He worked throughout Central and South America, Europe, the Far East, and Central Asia combating terrorism, narco-terrorism and narcotics trafficking, arms smuggling, counterfeiting, cyber-terrorists, and industrial and economic espionage.

MARK GRAHAM is a critically acclaimed author who has been writing and editing professionally since 1988. He has written and published three critically acclaimed full-length novels.

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Read an Excerpt

CHAPTER 1

 

WASHINGTON—DAY ONE

I pulled into the parking lot of the Georgetown dock and saw a double-decker river taxi overflowing with people getting ready to leave. I peeked at my watch. Two minutes. I found a short-term parking space, threw on the parking brake, and jogged to the ticket counter looking the part of a businessman on the verge of missing an afternoon meeting.

The guy at the ticket counter had seen plenty of guys like me, so he had my ticket ready and was holding up ten fingers. I handed him a ten, nodded my thanks, and headed down the ramp. The gate was already closed, but the attendant saw me coming.

“Just in time.” He put a crack in the gate, and I slid through.

“Thanks for waiting,” I said, even though I knew he hadn’t.

The Cherry Blossom looked like an old-time riverboat scudding down the Mississippi, the paddle wheel churning off the stern, spray gently showering the deck. I walked through the lower deck as the boat headed downriver. An eclectic gaggle of tourists crowded along the filigree railing as their guide’s voice rang out over the loudspeaker.

I looked for disinterested parties. I looked for a sidelong glance. I looked for a man dressed like a librarian or an accountant. I climbed the stairs to the second deck. The view improved, and I ignored it completely. A man in a tweed coat with a neck scarf tucked under his chin stood alone off the stern end, watching the paddle wheel turn. It was probably by chance that he was stationed next to the American flag dancing in the breeze, but I kind of doubted it.

“You look cold,” I said, standing next to him.

“When you’re seventy-six you’ll be cold pretty much every minute of every day, too,” Mr. Elliot said. I’d always called him Mr. Elliot. I always would.

“Then why the hell did you pick a water taxi in the middle of the Potomac for a get-together? I kind of miss our room in the Holiday Inn.”

He stared at me with blue eyes as challenging and icy as they’d been during our first meeting nearly thirty-five years earlier. His grin had taken on an ironic twist over the years, and I suppose that was inevitable given the business we were in. “A room at the Holiday Inn costs money. A senior’s pass gets me a view of the river for five bucks.”

“I paid ten,” I said.

“Your time will come, kid.”

He’d aged, to be sure, but the fire was still there. How many people could you say you trusted with your life? Well, with Dad dead and gone I was down to one. And here he stood. I could only hope that he felt the same.

“So. The White House chief of staff and a three-star in the same room,” he said with a chuckle. “Bet that lunch was a barrel of laughs.”

He was talking about an impromptu and rather extraordinary get-together at the Old Ebbitt Grill with my longtime friend Lieutenant General Thomas Rutledge and a political animal named Landon Fry, only the most powerful man in the country save the president himself. I didn’t like politicians. Fry was no exception. “I had the Monte Carlo, the general had a Cobb salad. Fry probably munched on the silverware.”

Mr. Elliot chuckled again. “You always have the Monte Carlo.” He drew his coat tightly around him and stared at the water churning below us. “They didn’t give you the details, of course.”

“They used The Twelver in the same sentence with critical mass and catastrophe, so I assume I’m going in headfirst,” I replied.

The Twelver. That’s all the general had needed to say. “The Twelver” was a two-word reference to Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, Iran’s president and the Agency’s least-favorite person. The Twelvers were the largest Shiite Muslim group in Iran. They believed the Twelve Imams to be the spiritual and political successors to Muhammad. It was an extraordinarily powerful position, because the Prophet’s successor was thought to be infallible. It was no secret that Ahmadinejad fancied himself the Twelfth Imam, even if few others did.

“You’ll go in headfirst and without a net,” Mr. Elliott corrected.

“So what’s new?”

Mr. Elliot turned and faced me, gimlet eyes burning, dead serious. I’d seen that look a hundred times before, and it always meant the same thing: showtime.

My longtime case officer said, “You’re back on the clock. Headed for the badlands. Boots on the ground.”

“I wouldn’t have it any other way.”

“You know we don’t call a guy out of retirement unless no one else can do the job, Jake,” Mr. Elliot said plainly. Then he got down to business. “Your mission is to develop indisputable intel proving that Iran has nukes and the launch capabilities to use them. We also want you to provide coordinates to support military strikes and covert assassinations inside that country. And you have two weeks max to do it.”

I wanted to say, Oh, is that all? No sweat. But I didn’t, of course. Mr. Elliot did not appreciate sarcasm. I started doing the math: two days to prep, eight days on the ground, and four days for the inevitable complications.

No sweat.

Mr. Elliot fished a pack of Chesterfields from his coat pocket, shook a cigarette out despite a NO SMOKING sign not twenty feet away, and used an old Zippo to light it. He smoked, and I watched the water. A gentle wake crested behind the boat, but I could just barely hear it over the riverboat’s engine. I heard voices, laughter, and footsteps as excited tourists moved to the starboard side of the boat. I followed their movement. The George Washington Monument pierced the air like a giant spike. The dome of the Thomas Jefferson Memorial seemed to hover like a flying saucer above columns of snow-white marble.

That’s how people reacted when they came to D.C. They saw the White House and the Library of Congress. They stared into Lincoln’s eyes and marveled at the names on the Vietnam Memorial. They gazed into the Reflecting Pool and tipped their heads to the sea of white at Arlington Cemetery. And they felt something. These were the symbols of their country, and they felt something. Pride, freedom, security. Who knew? But it was my job to protect that something. And if it meant a black op in the heart of most dangerous country on earth, well, so be it.

“I’ll need the MEK,” I said. The Mujahedin-e Khalq was Iran’s most powerful antigovernment group. They would do anything to topple the current regime. I knew their leadership as well as anyone in the Agency. I didn’t trust them any more than they trusted me. If I could aid in their movement, they would allow themselves to be used. “Which means starting in Paris.”

“Good. Because we have a little problem in Paris that needs taking care of.”

I didn’t like the sound of this, not with a two-week-timetable already staring me in the face. “So? Lay it on me.”

“There’s a leak.” His voice was a half-octave lower than it had been three seconds ago. “It begins with a member of the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence and ends with a French drug dealer who’s decided to try his hand at extortion. And so far he’s been damn successful. The leak needs to disappear, Jake. Your mission depends on it.”

He turned and looked across the water. I stared at the side of his face and said, “Details?”

“You’ll have them before you leave.” Mr. Elliot used a polished leather shoe to put out his cigarette. Now he vouchsafed me a look that was just this side of sympathy. “I know what you’re thinking. What about the senator? A rat sitting on one of the most powerful committees in the government. Who silences him?”

“And?”

“I’ll take care of it. You put your guy in Paris out of business, and I’ll put mine out here.” He fished out another smoke.

“Thought you were quitting,” I said.

“That was before they dragged my favorite operative out of his rocking chair, and I had to take up my babysitting duties again.” He grinned. The grin turned into a snakebitten chuckle. I may have been fifty-six, but I still looked forty-five—that being my own humble opinion, of course. Well, maybe if the lighting was just right. I could still dead lift five hundred pounds and run a marathon in five hours. What was all this about a rocking chair? “Okay, granted, you still look like you’ve got a couple of miles left in the tank.”

“Helluva compliment. Thanks a bunch.” I gripped the railing as the riverboat inched toward the dock at Alexandria. “Any more surprises?”

“The DDO will be sitting in on your meeting tomorrow at the Pentagon. Be nice. You’re going to need him,” Mr. Elliot advised.

The Agency’s deputy director of operations was a politician through and through, but nothing went down without his approval. I would need him: Mr. Elliot was right about that. But he was just part of the op. I would run him just like I did every other asset, as if he were a blink of an eye away from slitting my throat. I said, “How much will he know?”

“He’ll know the op, but he won’t like it.” Mr. Elliot slipped a hand into his coat pocket and came away with a disposable phone in his palm. When the riverboat lurched to a halt, he grabbed my arm for balance, and the phone slid into my hand. The exchange was so quick and seamless that it reminded me of the old days. “It’s good for three calls.”

I looked into his eyes. He had something else to tell me, and it wasn’t going to be pretty. I made it easy for him. “And…?”

“That obvious, huh?”

“We’ve known each other a long time.”

“I’ve made contact with the Russians in Saint Petersburg,” he said.

The Russians in Saint Petersburg. That could mean only one thing: the Russian mafia. I was right. Not pretty at all. In fact, downright ugly.

I turned to go. “This your stop?”

“Nah. I bought a round trip.”

“A round trip for five bucks!” I caught his eye one last time. “I gotta give the AARP credit.”

Last I saw him, he was lighting another cigarette with his Zippo, and it did my heart good to know that he had my back again.

I went in search of a taxi. Everything from this moment on was a full-blown black op.

 

Copyright © 2012 by Wayne Simmons and Mark Graham

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 11, 2013

    Insightful Thriller

    Easy and mesmerizing read of actions that could have or will have to play out to prevent evil from succeeding. Considering the background of the authors, credibility makes the scenario believable. Could easily be picked up for a thrilling screen presentation.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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