The Natural World

The Natural World

by Jon Richards, Ed Simkins
     
 

Be amazed by the real-life size of the world's largest spider; discover which animal can jump the equivalent of a human leaping over a skyscraper; measure the length of a blue whale in buses, people, and basketball courts; and more!

From the animal classification system and DNA to reproduction, food webs, and the world's fastest animals, this book explores the

See more details below

  • Checkmark Kids' Club Eligible  Shop Now

Overview

Be amazed by the real-life size of the world's largest spider; discover which animal can jump the equivalent of a human leaping over a skyscraper; measure the length of a blue whale in buses, people, and basketball courts; and more!

From the animal classification system and DNA to reproduction, food webs, and the world's fastest animals, this book explores the natural world using a wide variety of icons, graphics, and pictograms.

Highly visual and accessible, infographics are an increasingly popular way to introduce complex stats, facts, and figures to children, helping them to digest complex information on a number of topics.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Infographics are a succinct and often illuminating way to make one’s point (as anyone who’s recently spent time on Facebook knows), and Richard and Simkins use bright digital graphs, charts, pictograms, and other high-impact images to explore topics related to life on Earth in this smart kickoff to a series. Various spreads compare animals’ lifespans, speed, and sizes; human deaths due to different diseases (represented by skulls and crossbones of varying sizes); the evolution of animal life on Earth; and multiple life cycles. Visual learners, trivia hounds, and budding scientists will be delighted. Simultaneously available: Planet Earth: The World in Infographics. Ages 8�up. (Mar.)
From the Publisher

"[A] smart kickoff to a series…Visual learners, trivia hounds, and budding scientists will be delighted."
— Publishers Weekly Starred Review

"All living things belong to one of six kingdoms. Each kingdom is divided into groups, from phylum down to species. The graphic shows how a species, in this case the wolf, is identified using this classification system."
— from the book

Children's Literature - Jill Walton
Welcome to a feast of information and revel as one piece of data after another entices the reader to step right into the world of science. Visit the order of living things, the microscopic world, evolution, who lives the shortest amount of time and who lives the longest, but there is more, much more! The clever colorful illustrations present the greatest show on earth; our world and how it came to be. The text material is spectacular and solid. This book, one in the "Infographics" series, can be more than just read—used as an answer to a science trivia question or a research source. The scientific facts are surrounded by graphics that are unpredictable and fascinating. The presentation of material does not flow in predictable directions and the span of knowledge covered is huge. Children will use this data to show off and parents and teachers will welcome the fresh and unique format. The contents, glossary, A-Z index, and resources guide are real assets for inquiring minds. This is an impressive most welcome addition to any classroom and any library! Reviewer: Jill Walton
Kirkus Reviews
Kicking off a series, this spotty tour of the biosphere demonstrates both the possibilities and the pitfalls of infographics. Made up of realistically shaped silhouettes in a range of dizzyingly intense colors, the pictorial graphs packed into each single-topic spread are intended to highlight sequential or comparative relationships. Thematic groupings include the development of life on Earth, types of cells, the range of animal sizes and population trends in selected endangered species. At their best, as in a historical chart of mass extinctions or a silhouette of a sequoia next to a stack of 29 elephants, the visuals are both vivid and revelatory. More often, though, the graphics are poorly scaled (are chicken and turtle eggs really the same size, and what kind of turtle are we talking about?) or are really just stylized illustrations--a strand of DNA, an isolated slice of bread, a diagram of cell division. The accompanying captions and comments aren't always enlightening either: Ostrich eggs "weigh about 3.5 lb. (1.5 kg)--nearly two bags of sugar." A trendy instructional tool, applied with mixed success both here and in the co-published Planet Earth, which gives our geology and atmosphere the same quick once-over. (Nonfiction. 8-10)

Read More

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781926973746
Publisher:
Owlkids Books
Publication date:
03/12/2013
Series:
The World in Infographics
Edition description:
Reprint
Pages:
32
Sales rank:
724,379
Product dimensions:
7.60(w) x 9.90(h) x 0.40(d)
Lexile:
IG1110L (what's this?)
Age Range:
8 - 12 Years

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >