The New Charcuterie Cookbook: Exceptional Cured Meats to Make and Serve at Home by Jamie Bissonnette, NOOK Book (eBook) | Barnes & Noble
The New Charcuterie Cookbook: Exceptional Cured Meats to Make and Serve at Home

The New Charcuterie Cookbook: Exceptional Cured Meats to Make and Serve at Home

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by Jamie Bissonnette
     
 

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James Beard Best Chef Award Winner

Master the Art of Charcuterie With Outstanding Recipes From An Award-Winning Chef

You haven't become a true food-crafter until you've mastered the art of charcuterie, and who better to show you the ropes than nose-to-tail icon, Jamie Bissonnette?
The New Charcuterie Cookbook features sausages, confits, salumi

Overview

James Beard Best Chef Award Winner

Master the Art of Charcuterie With Outstanding Recipes From An Award-Winning Chef

You haven't become a true food-crafter until you've mastered the art of charcuterie, and who better to show you the ropes than nose-to-tail icon, Jamie Bissonnette?
The New Charcuterie Cookbook features sausages, confits, salumi, pates and many other dishes for the home cook. With a wide variety of recipes, such as Banana Leaf-Wrapped Porchetta, Lebanese Lamb Sausages, Mexican Chorizo, Traditional Saucisson Sec and Simply Perfect Duck Prosciutto, you'll have a whole chopping block full of fun and different flavors to try that are distinctively Jamie's.
Packed with creative and delicious recipes, step-by-step photography and Jamie's insider knowledge and signature charm, this book is the only thing you'll need to make the best charcuterie at home.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

“Jamie can take ordinary food, even odd bits, fifth quarter stuff (the pluck, the viscera, the nasty to some), and make angels weep. That's real cooking. And it's why this book belongs stained and used, torn and beaten in the kitchen of every human being who owns a cutting board.” —ANDREW ZIMMERN, television personality, chef and host of Bizarre Foods With Andrew Zimmern

“I've had many of Jamie's cured meats and they're like no other: flavors as deeply original and vivid as the chef himself. The New Charcuterie Cookbook is an easy, approachable and stylish handbook that makes any home cook an instant expert in the rewarding craft of curing.” —TED ALLEN, host of Chopped

“The world needs more bologna, and Jamie Bissonnette is the man for the job. Jamie is a chef's chef. He's dedicated to his craft, generous with his knowledge and cooks the food all of us want to eat. Plus, he's insanely creative with his charcuterie. I promise you won't get passed page ten of this book without your mouth watering.” —DAVID CHANG, Momofuku

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781624140471
Publisher:
Page Street Publishing
Publication date:
09/16/2014
Sold by:
Macmillan
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
176
Sales rank:
569,304
File size:
36 MB
Note:
This product may take a few minutes to download.

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Read an Excerpt

The New Charcuterie Cookbook

Exceptional Cured Meats to Make and Serve at Home


By Jamie Bissonnette, Ken Goodman

Page Street Publishing Co.

Copyright © 2014 Jamie Bissonnette
All rights reserved.
ISBN: 978-1-62414-047-1



CHAPTER 1

Cooked Charcuterie


For cooks who are just starting out, charcuterie is relatively easy. These recipes are approachable, ingredients are common and easy to find, and you don't have to worry about the flavor quite so much. Plus, it's a lot more sanitary than curing. As with all of these recipes, though, don't forget to wear gloves when handling raw meat. In addition, place the metal parts for your grinder in the freezer overnight as preparation for grinding. These recipes can be stored and refrigerated in tight-fitted plastic wrap or an airtight container for about 7 days.

Many of these recipes call for casings. I buy all of my casings at sausagemaker.com.


Lemongrass and Green Curry Sausages

YIELD: 16 SAUSAGES

I remember eating beetle leaf sausages on a charcoal grill street side in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam — talk about a transcending dining experience! Sweet and spicy grilled sausage in Pattaya, Thailand, were just as awesome. I combined them both for the Cochon 555 competition when I returned from that trip. Needless to say, I won.

4 oz (113 g) palm sugar (aka jaggery), grated
4 garlic cloves, rough chopped
1 oz (30 g) fresh ginger root, not peeled
1 red Thai (bird's eye) chili, seeds removed and minced to a paste
3 tbsp (45 g) green curry paste
Kosher salt to taste
2 oz (59 ml) fish sauce
4 oz (113 g) mint, picked
4 oz (113 g) cilantro, washed but with stems intact
4 oz (113 g) Thai basil, washed but with stems intact
4 oz (113 g) lemon grass, rough cut
10 kaffir lime leaves, fresh or frozen
4 lb (1.5 kg) pork shoulder, deboned and diced to ½-inch (1.2-cm) pieces
1 lb (450 g) pork fatback, diced
Canola oil
2 lb (900 g) Swiss chard, largest leaves possible, for wrapping sausage


Day 1

Use a mortar and pestle large enough to contain all the fresh ingredients except the Swiss chard. Mash the palm sugar to a paste. Add the garlic and ginger and continue mashing. Add the Thai chili, curry paste and fish sauce and continue mashing.

Separately, roughly chop the mint, cilantro and Thai basil. The stems from the cilantro are tasty, and the stems from the basil will add flavor and texture. Don't chop the herbs too much, as it will all be going through the grinder later.

In a large bowl, add the paste from the mortar, the chopped herbs, the lemon grass, the whole lime leaves and the diced meat. Mix to combine. Transfer to a nonreactive (glass or plastic) container and cover tightly. Refrigerate overnight.


Day 2

Set up the meat grinder, all metal parts from the freezer. Dump the mixture of meat and marinade, including any liquid in the bottom of the container, into the grinder. Grind on medium-size (¼") plate into a bowl sitting on ice. Mix the meat to combine.

Heat up a small sauté pan with a little canola oil. Pull off a ½-inch/1.2-cm piece of the meat mixture and fry in a saucepan, then taste for seasoning. Adjust with salt, fish sauce and sugar, as needed.

Rest the meat in the refrigerator for 1 hour.

While the sausage is chilling, cut the stem out of the Swiss chard. Cut the leaves into 4- to 5-inch (10–13-cm) squares. The cuts can be mixed, and holes are okay. Save the scraps.

To assemble the sausage, place a square of Swiss chard, shiny side down, on a flat surface. Form about 3 ounces (85 g) of the sausage meat into a rough link and place the Swiss chard in the center. Wrap like a loose burrito and place in a container with the seam side down. Repeat until all sausage meat is used. If you run out of Swiss chard, try to cobble some pieces together from the scrap. If you don't have enough, form the sausage into 3-ounce (85g) mini burger patties, then lay some leaf scrap on the top and bottom. (These can be served like sliders).

To cook the sausages, preheat a grill or cast-iron griddle pan. Brush the grill with vegetable oil, but do not season or oil the sausages. Grill until the sausages are fully cooked. The Swiss chard will blacken and shrink, but this adds flavor.

Serve on hot dog rolls with pickles, Kimchi (here) and mayo, or with Nuoc Cham (here) and pickled oysters. Alternatively, let cool to room temperature and serve with salad.


Banana Leaf–Wrapped Porchetta

SERVES 12 TO 14 PEOPLE

Porchetta can be prepared in many ways. Italian cooks usually start this 2-day recipe with seasoned and rolled center-cut boneless primal, or pork belly, then cook it until the center is tender and the skin is crispy, like cracklings. I love it. The skin is the best part! This recipe is for a porchetta with a tender skin and a ton of flavor. If you have any extra sausage meat, roll it in the center of this before cooking.


Porchetta

3 cups (720 g) cure (recipe below)
1 middle primal cut of pig, about 8 lb (3 kg), skin on (If you don't have a whole pig you can use pork belly, skin on.)
6 long peppers or black pepper
Butcher's twine
1 package banana leaf


The Cure

1 tsp (5 g) black pepper
1 tsp (5 g) coriander, toasted
1 tsp (5 g) fennel seed, toasted
1 tsp (5 g) fenugreek, toasted
1 stick cinnamon bark
1 oz (2 g) pink curing salt no. 1
2 cups (480 g) kosher salt
4 garlic cloves, minced
1 cup (240 g) sugar


Day 1

To prepare the cure, crush the spices in a mortar and pestle. Mix the spices with the pink curing salt, kosher salt, minced garlic and sugar.

Rub the cure on the meat side of the pork. Let cure for 24 hours in the refrigerator.


Day 2

Wipe the cure off the meat. Season with long pepper.

Place the meat skin side down on a flat surface. Roll the pork, keeping the center as tight as possible. If desired, roll the pork around any extra sausage meat.

Truss the pork like a roast, as tight as possible. To do this, cut 15 to 20 strands of butcher's twine, each 2 feet (60 cm) long. Lay them out 1 inch (2.5 cm) apart. Place the rolled porchetta on top.

Start by tying the center string. Move two strings from the center over to the left and tie another. Then move two strings over to the right and repeat. Tie every other string until you reach the end, then move back to the center and tie the remaining strings, alternating side to side.

Cut 10 additional 2-foot (60-cm) long strands of twine and lay out as before. Position the banana leaves on top of the twine in a rectangle large enough to wrap the entire porchetta. Roll the pork up in the banana leaf and retruss with twine as before.

Let the sausages rest for at least 2 and up to 12 hours in the refrigerator.

Preheat the oven to 375°F (190°C). Cook the porchetta on a wire rack on a roasting tray for 1½ to 2 hours. Rotate every 45 minutes. Cook to an internal temperature of 150°F (65°C).

Depending on your oven, you might want to cut the roast in half, but this should be done after you tie it.

Cool the sausages to room temperature. Remove banana leaves and twine, then slice thin and serve like deli meat. If you are only using a little at a time, leave the banana leaf and twine on. This porchetta can be frozen or kept in the refrigerator for 6 to 10 days.


Lebanese Lamb Sausages

YIELD: 10 SAUSAGES

At Toro in Boston, we have an amazing neighbor and friend named Jay Hajj. Jay grew up in Beirut. (He's also our landlord, but I would have said nice things either way.) He is one of the most humble and natural cooks I've met. We do a few dinners a year, and he cooks all Lebanese food. He makes a version of this sausage. His is better, but he won't give me the recipe.

5 lb (2 kg) lamb shoulder, boneless, diced (½" [1.2-cm] pieces)
2 oz (57 g) kosher salt
2 cups (473 ml) red pepper purée
5 oz (142 g) pine nuts, toasted
5 garlic gloves, chopped rough
1 bunch mint, picked and chopped
2 lemons, zested and chopped
1 oz (30 g) za'atar spice
2 oz (57 g) paprika
Canola oil

Sheep casing, soaked in tepid water for 2 hours before use


Mix the meat with all other ingredients except the casing. Let the mixture marinade for a few hours or overnight, but no longer than 12 hours.

Set up the meat grinder, all metal parts from the freezer. Grind on a medium-size (¼") plate into a bowl sitting on ice. Mix until combined and sticky.

Heat up a small sauté pan with a little canola oil. Pull off a 1- to 2-inch (2.5–5-cm) piece of the meat mixture and fry in a saucepan, then taste for seasoning. Adjust as needed.

Keep the casing wet while you work with it. Slide the casing onto the funnel but don't make a knot. Put the meat in the stuffer and pack it down. Begin extruding. As the meat comes out, pull the casing back over the nozzle and tie a knot.

Extrude one full coil, about 48 inches (1.3 m) long, and tie it off. Crimp with fingers to separate sausage. Twist the casing once one way, then the other way in between each sausage. Repeat along the entire coil. Once the sausage is cased, use a sterile needle to prick any air pockets. Prick each sausage 4 or 5 times.

Repeat the casing process to use the remaining sausage.

Once the sausage is cased, place the coils on a roasting rack or towel-lined roasting pan and dry in refrigerator for 1 to 12 hours (1 hour minimum but the longer, the better).

If you have your own curing room, follow the necessary steps for your particular curing room.

When ready, cut each sausage away from the link and grill to order or poach to an internal temperature of 145°F (63°C).


Habanero and Maple Breakfast Sausages

YIELD: 20 SAUSAGES

In some sausage recipes the meat is ground, then mixed. In some recipes the meat is mixed with seasoning and then ground. This one is mixed first, and here's why: Marinating the meat with the maple, spices and salt cures the meat so when it cooks it doesn't give off so much fat. This is ideal for a breakfast sausage — start off the morning with more flavor and less grease. I like to form this sausage into little patties and sauté them on the stove or cook them on the grill. If you don't want the extra work, you can bake them in cupcake tins. Seriously, it works!

3 lb (1 kg) pork butt (or any mixed, mostly lean pork scraps), diced (½" [1.2-cm] pieces)
1 ½ lb (680 g) pork belly, skin off, diced
1.25 oz (35 g) kosher salt
1 bunch sage, picked and chopped fine
1 oz (30 g) habanero, roasted, peeled and seeds removed
5 garlic gloves, rough chopped
2 cups (473 ml) best-quality maple syrup
2 oz (57 g) smoked paprika
Canola oil) pork belly, skin off, diced


Mix the meat with all other ingredients. Let the mixture marinade for a few hours or overnight, but no longer than 12 hours.

Set up the meat grinder, all metal parts from the freezer. Grind on a medium-size (¼") plate into a bowl sitting on ice. Mix until combined and sticky.

Heat up a small sauté pan with a little canola oil. Pull off a 1- to 2-inch (2.5–5-cm) piece of the meat mixture and fry in a saucepan, then taste for seasoning. Adjust as needed.

Form the sausage into patties and cook or grill. Alternatively, fill the cups of a metal cupcake pan with 2-inch (5-cm) pieces of sausage and bake at 325°F (163°C) for 15 minutes.


Goat Merguez

YIELD: 12 SAUSAGES

Although goat is served all over Europe, and it's one of the most consumed meats in the world, it's generally underappreciated in the United States. But it's tasty, tender and flavorful, and it makes a wonderful sausage. Although this sausage is traditionally cased in sheep casing, for a grilled sausage plate at Toro, I prefer hank. But either would work. Serve with homemade Harissa (see here) and couscous for a great-tasting tapas.

4.5 lb (2.3 kg) goat meat, diced (½" [1.2-cm] pieces)
1 lb (450 g) pork belly, rind on, diced
Zest from 1 orange
1 tsp (5 g) mint, chopped
1 tsp (5 g) cumin
1 tsp (5 g) coriander
1 tsp (5 g) fennel seeds
1 ½ tbsp (23 g) smoked paprika
1 ½ tbsp (23 g) hot spicy paprika
½ tsp espelette pepper (piment d'Espelette)
1 tsp (5 g) caraway, toasted and ground
2 cloves garlic, minced
3 tbsp (45 g) nonfat dairy milk power
3 tbsp (45 g) kosher salt
½ tsp freshly ground black pepper
1 ½ tsp (7 g) pink curing salt no. 1
Canola oil

Sheep casing, soaked in tepid water for 2 hours before use


Set up the meat grinder, all metal parts from the freezer. Grind the meat on a small (1/8") plate into a bowl sitting on ice. Add the orange zest and the mint to the meat mixture, then cover and keep chilled while you prepare the other ingredients.

Toast the cumin, coriander and fennel seeds. Grind the spices. Blend the spices, all remaining ingredients and about ½ cup (118 ml) water for 1 minute. Pour the mixture over meat and combine.

Heat up a small sauté pan with a little canola oil. Pull off about ½ ounce (15 g) of meat and fry to taste for seasonings. Adjust seasonings if needed.

Soak the sheep casing in tepid water for 2 hours to soften before stuffing it. Keep the casing wet while you work with it. Slide the casing onto the funnel but don't make a knot. Put the meat in the stuffer and pack it down. Begin extruding. As the meat comes out, pull the casing back over the nozzle and tie a knot.

Extrude one full coil, about 48 inches (1.3 m) long, and tie it off. Crimp with fingers to separate sausage. Twist the casing once one way, then the other way in between each link. Repeat along the entire coil. Once the sausage is cased, use a sterile needle to prick any air pockets. Prick each sausage 4 or 5 times.

Repeat the casing process to use remaining sausage.

Once the sausage is cased, place the coils on a roasting rack or towel-lined roasting pan and dry in refrigerator for 1 to 12 hours. (Let the sausage dry for at least 1 hour but the longer, the better).

If you have your own curing room, follow the necessary steps for your particular curing room.

When the sausage is ready, cut each sausage away from the link and grill to order or poach to an internal temperature of 145°F (63°C).


Chipotle Turkey Meatloaf

FEEDS 4 TO 6 PEOPLE

Turkey is awesome. So many people only like it around holidays like Thanksgiving. It's tragic. Great turkey has so much flavor, and making a meatloaf with turkey is a great way to showcase it. Plus, it's healthy! I've had some great wild turkey tacos in Mexico and took the idea of those flavors for this recipe. Think of it like spicy Thanksgiving leftovers.

1 cup (240 g) Spanish onion, peeled and diced
1 tbsp (15 g) garlic, chopped
2 tbsp (30 g) butter
3 tbsp (45 ml) Worcestershire sauce
1/3 cup (79 ml) chicken stock
2 tsp (10 ml) chipotle pepper purée (from a can with adobo)
1 lb (450 g) ground turkey
¾ cup (180 g) bread crumbs
2 eggs
½ cup (118 ml) ketchup
2 tbsp (30 g) parsley, picked and chopped
1 tsp (5 g) kosher salt
1 tsp (5 g) black pepper
1 tsp (5 g) cinnamon
Canola oil


Preheat oven to 325°F (163°C).

In a medium-size (¼") pan sweat the onions and garlic in butter until they are tender and clear. Add the Worcestershire sauce, chicken stock and chipotle paste, then mix to combine. Cool to room temperature.

Combine the ground turkey, bread crumbs, eggs, ketchup, onion mix and parsley in a large bowl. Mix to combine completely. Season with salt, pepper and cinnamon.

Heat up a small sauté pan with a little canola oil. Pull off a 1- to 2-inch (2.5–5-cm) piece of the turkey mixture and fry in a saucepan, then taste for seasoning. Adjust as needed. Shape into a rectangular loaf or pack into a greased terrine mold.

Bake for 1 ½ hours or until the internal temperature reaches 160°F (71°C). Serve hot or chill and serve cold as a sandwich. Remember, if you want to serve it cold, season more aggressively because flavors dull as they cool.


The Importance Of Simply Done Turkey Breast

YIELD: 4 POUNDS (1.5 KG) OF TURKEY

As a kid growing up, I always loved turkey sandwiches and turkey quesadillas — they're my guilty pleasure. I always wanted a turkey sandwich on my menu, but every time I made it, the roast turkey was very dry. I experimented a lot with brine to get the breast to stay moist. Once you've carved this and you get to the ends, cook them up with cream of mushroom soup and sour cream and make an awesome "Shit on a Shingle."

4 lb (1.5 kg) boneless turkey breast, skin on
Salt
Black pepper


(Continues...)

Excerpted from The New Charcuterie Cookbook by Jamie Bissonnette, Ken Goodman. Copyright © 2014 Jamie Bissonnette. Excerpted by permission of Page Street Publishing Co..
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

Meet the Author

JAMIE BISSONNETTE is the chef and owner of Toro NYC, and Coppa and Toro Boston. He is a James Beard Foundation Best Chef Northeast award winner and winner of the Cochon 555 nose-to-tail competition. Jamie has been featured in The Boston Globe, The Wall Street Journal and Bon Appetit. He was also awarded the People's Choice: Best New Chef award by Food&Wine magazine. Jamie splits his time between Boston, Massachusetts and New York City.

ANDREW ZIMMERN is a chef, food writer, and teacher, as well as the host of the Travel Channel's hit show, Bizarre Foods with Andrew Zimmern and Bizarre Foods America. Andrew has been a featured guest on various popular national television shows such as NBC's Today Show, The Dr. Oz Show, Access Hollywood, Nightline, and E!'s The Soup. Born and raised in New York City, Andrew currently resides in Minnesota with his wife and son.

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