BN.com Gift Guide

The New Dealers' War: F.D.R. and the War Within World War II

Overview

Acclaimed historian Thomas Fleming brings to life a flawed and troubled FDR struggling to manage World War II. Starting with the leak to the press of Roosevelt's famous Rainbow Plan, then spiraling back to FDR's inept prewar diplomacy with Japan and his various attempts to lure Japan into an attack on the U.S. Fleet in the Pacific, Fleming takes the reader on a journey through the incredibly fractious struggles and debates that went on in Washington, the nation, and the world as the New Dealers strove to impose ...

See more details below
Paperback (Reprint)
$17.79
BN.com price
(Save 28%)$24.95 List Price
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (40) from $1.99   
  • New (8) from $8.60   
  • Used (32) from $1.99   
The New Dealers' War: FDR And The War Within World War II

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 7.0
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 10.1
  • NOOK HD Tablet
  • NOOK HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK eReaders
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$13.99
BN.com price
(Save 43%)$24.95 List Price

Overview

Acclaimed historian Thomas Fleming brings to life a flawed and troubled FDR struggling to manage World War II. Starting with the leak to the press of Roosevelt's famous Rainbow Plan, then spiraling back to FDR's inept prewar diplomacy with Japan and his various attempts to lure Japan into an attack on the U.S. Fleet in the Pacific, Fleming takes the reader on a journey through the incredibly fractious struggles and debates that went on in Washington, the nation, and the world as the New Dealers strove to impose their will on the conduct of the War. In bold contrast to the familiar, idealized FDR of other biographies, Fleming's Roosevelt is a man in remorseless decline, battered by ideological forces and primitive hatreds that he could not handleand frequently failed to understandsome of them leading to unimaginable catastrophe. Among FDR's most dismaying policies, Fleming argues, is his insistence on "unconditional surrender" for Germany (a policy that perhaps prolonged the war by as much as two years, leaving millions more dead) and his often-uncritical embrace of and acquiescence to Stalin and the Soviets as an ally. The New Dealers' War is one of those rare books that force readers to rethink what they think they know about a pivotal event in the American past.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

From Barnes & Noble
Thomas Fleming, the author of Duel, turns his attention to the WWII policies of President Franklin Delano Roosevelt. In this controversial study, Fleming contends that FDR's insistence on Germany's unconditional surrender prolonged the global struggle for at least a year, and possibly two, at the cost of tens of thousands of lives. A revisionist view certain to gain media attention.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780465024650
  • Publisher: Basic Books
  • Publication date: 6/28/2002
  • Edition description: Reprint
  • Pages: 672
  • Sales rank: 733,126
  • Product dimensions: 6.00 (w) x 9.10 (h) x 1.80 (d)

Meet the Author

Thomas Fleming is the author of more than forty books, including The New Dealers' War, Duel, and Liberty! The American Revolution, as well as best-selling novels about America's war experience such as Time and Tide and The Officers' Wives. Fleming is a frequent guest on and contributor to NPR, PBS, A&E, and the History Channel. He lives in New York City and Westbrook, Connecticut.

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 8 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 26, 2006

    Paleoconservative/Libertarian Revisionism

    This book is an absurd rehash of discredited theories purporting to explain the nefarious motivations and/or incompetencies of FDR which led to US involvement in World War II. As such, it is a polemic against FDR, the New Deal and internationlism, rather than a balanced or fair account of the events or the people who steered the US ship of state through the turbulent waters of the war years. Fleming's long association with ultra-libertarian, paleo-conservative, and neo-confederate organizations and causes does not give one confidence in him as a dispassionate and even-handed observer, and that lack of confidence is amply confirmed in this volume. For readers who are interested in real scholarship and a comprehensive understanding of the US involvement in WWII, they are better served by Gerhard Weinberg's 'World at Arms.' For those who seek a balanced view of FDR, including both his admirable and difficult qualities, Conrad Black's biography is recommended. Unfortunately, 'New Dealer's War' is little more than a thinly veiled and inept attempt to promote the islationism of the America Firsters of the 30's and early 40's.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 30, 2006

    Revisionist Fiction

    Those who are drawn to conspiracy theories and/or hate Roosevelt and the New Deal will undoubtedly enjoy this book and use it to support long-held myths about: how the war started (Roosevelt ¿lured¿ the Japanese into attacking in order to provoke Germany into declaring war) the unconditional surrender policy (an irresponsible attempt to deal with domestic political pressures) and the Yalta Conference (Roosevelt ¿gave away¿ Poland and Eastern Europe to the Russians). Like most myths, these may contain kernels of truth, but readers looking for a balanced and accurate understanding of these issues will not find it here. The author appears to have discarded dispassionate historical method in favor of tired polemics. Though Fleming¿s narrative storytelling style is compelling, his analysis is so distorted and hobbled by omissions that his account would be more accurately classified as historical fiction. In the end, this book enlightens us more about the author¿s biases than it does about the people and events it purports to explain.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 15, 2004

    At last: Roosevelt the war criminal exposed

    Fleming traces FDR's sneak complicity with drunken demagogue Churchill to drag an unwilling US into WWll, exposes FDR's pathological lust to remain president even after his inducing a second depression in 1937;discusses how FDR authors the destruction of all the warring participants with his moronic phrase 'Unconditional surrender', causing the Germans to resist suicidally, then betrays US to russia at Yalta.

    1 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 28, 2002

    Enlightening

    No president is perfect; they are human, and have both strong and weak points. FDR was no exception. The Publisher's Weekly review is dishonest. History should never gloss over a leader's weak points just because he has a monument in Washington. This book does a service because it does not re-glorify the glorified. This book concentrates very specifically on FDR's handling of the war, and does not bash his 'New Deal' for cheap shots. FDR and his administration were 1930s liberal Democrats, and that, coupled with strong cultural views (we would call it racism and cultural centrism today), a bitter taste for Europe in general (and specifically Germany) after WWI, and his failing health (his work-week was chopped to 20 hours a day; he was not nearly competent enough to deal with Stalin and all the vagaries of a nation at war) got in the way of successful war planning. FDR may have been a great strategist, but that does not mean he was a great military strategist: he was picking a fight with two nations ready for war when his was woefully behind in that reguard, and he did not move at all to stimulate war production until well after Pearl Harbor. It is ironic that most of the 'Don'ts' and 'slippery slope' arguements of today¿s war on terrorism: Don't go after civilians, Don't culture bash, Don't alienate possible allies in the enemy's ranks, Don't trample on the civil rights of U.S. citizens from the country your fighting, all happened in spades during this war, yet all the slippery slopes never slid. We are so worried about that stuff today, and believe me, if the slippery slopes didn't slide after WWII, they won't now.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 29, 2002

    World War II in the proper perspective

    Realistic assessment, devoid of panegyric elements. Fleming has the courage to break through plenty of self-delusions. Joined with other recent books on WW II, one comes to the conclusion that FDR, in his unrelenting efforts to enter WW II and to broaden it, helped cement the framework in which Hitler could carry out mass murder. Everything should have been done to prevent it. All German efforts to end the war or to prevent it from expanding were rebuffed. There appears to be a pathology in FDR that has not yet been examined.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 26, 2001

    A New and Honest View of FDR

    Covers the period in FDR's 3rd and 4th terms leading up to and during WWII. Especially critical of FDR's devious ways, his clinging to the call for 'unconditional surrender',and hiding his poor health. Good descriptions of how he fell for Stalin, how and why Wallace was bumped from vice-president in '44. This is not the traditional view of FDR. Well written and easy to read. No suprise it has not been reviewed (as yet) in the New York Times.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 4, 2008

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted December 18, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 8 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)