The New Hollywood

Overview

The studio system, which had dominated Hollywood for more than half a century, finally fell apart in the late 1960s. The uncertainty that followed opened the way for independent producers, many of whom were already specializing in exploitation movies with titles like Slumber Party Massacre, which were targeted at the 12-to-20-year-old age group. These films, with their starvation budgets and impossible shooting schedules, gave a start to a number of notable directors. Others were meanwhile trying their luck in ...
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Overview

The studio system, which had dominated Hollywood for more than half a century, finally fell apart in the late 1960s. The uncertainty that followed opened the way for independent producers, many of whom were already specializing in exploitation movies with titles like Slumber Party Massacre, which were targeted at the 12-to-20-year-old age group. These films, with their starvation budgets and impossible shooting schedules, gave a start to a number of notable directors. Others were meanwhile trying their luck in television or shooting experimental movies. The first post-studio directors, the so-called "movie brats" (Spielberg, Lucas, Coppola, Scorsese, and De Palma) are now famous. Behind them has come a new generation of directors, often controversial, who now make some of Hollywood's most interesting pictures. This book, based on in-depth interviews, looks at the experiences of some thirty of them in getting established and keeping afloat in the new Hollywood. Drawing upon information gathered in interviews more often than quoting directly from them, Jim Hillier has produced an absorbing account from the filmmakers' viewpoint of the business of filmmaking. Some of the new generation of directors have already had hits such as Terminator (James Cameron), The Silence of the Lambs (Jonathan Demme), Gremlins (Joe Dante), Sleeping with the Enemy (Joseph Ruben), and Look Who's Talking (Amy Heckerling). Others continue to make inexpensive horror movies. Yet others divide their time between cinema and television, among them Michael Mann, who directed Manhunter for the cinema and produced Miami Vice and Crime Story for television, and David Lynch of Blue Velvet, Wild at Heart, and Twin Peaks. Among those included are Bill Duke (A Rage in Harlem), Mike Figgis (Internal Affairs), Randa Haines (Children of a Lesser God), Tim Hunter (River's Edge), Spike Lee (Do the Right Thing), Jim McBride (The Big Easy), and Susan Seidelman (Desperately Seeking Susan). Today, the name Hol
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Editorial Reviews

Booknews
Profiles the young independent filmmakers who are expected to provide--and in many cases have already provided--the future direction for filmmaking in Hollywood. This is an insiders view or the movie-making process that yields tangible insights and is entertaining to boot. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780826406385
  • Publisher: Continuum International Publishing Group
  • Publication date: 8/1/1994
  • Pages: 288
  • Product dimensions: 6.81 (w) x 10.06 (h) x 0.87 (d)

Table of Contents

Preface 4
Forty Years of Change: Hollywood from the 1940s to the 1980s 6
Towards 2000 18
Starting Out in Exploitation 38
Moving Up 50
The Bigger Picture 74
The Little Picture 99
Unequal Opportunities: Women Film-Makers 122
Unequal Opportunities: Black Film-Makers 143
Foreigners 163
Director Credits 178
Sources 186
Index 187
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