Overview

The New Kingmakers documents the rise of the developer class, and provides strategies for companies to adapt to the new technology landscape. From recruiting to retention, it provides a playbook to work more efficiently and effectively with the most important members of your organization.

Read More Show Less
... See more details below
The New Kingmakers

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 7.0
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 10.1
  • NOOK HD Tablet
  • NOOK HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK eReaders
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$5.99
BN.com price
(Save 14%)$6.99 List Price

Overview

The New Kingmakers documents the rise of the developer class, and provides strategies for companies to adapt to the new technology landscape. From recruiting to retention, it provides a playbook to work more efficiently and effectively with the most important members of your organization.

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781449367916
  • Publisher: O'Reilly Media, Incorporated
  • Publication date: 3/11/2013
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 56
  • Sales rank: 651,526
  • File size: 3 MB

Meet the Author

Stephen O’Grady is a co-founder of the developer-focused technology analyst firm, RedMonk. Regularly cited in publications such as the New York Times, BusinessWeek, and the Wall Street Journal, Stephen’s work revolves around understanding developer needs and trends and working with businesses to help them work more effectively with the New Kingmakers. Although his birth certificate says New York City, Stephen is a Red Sox fan, born and raised. A graduate of Williams College, Stephen lives in Midcoast Maine with his wife.

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Dedication;
Foreword;
Chapter 1: Introduction;
1.1 The CIO Is the Last to Know;
Chapter 2: The New Kingmakers;
2.1 Buy the Company to Hire the People;
2.2 What Are Developers Worth? A DOJ Suit;
2.3 The People vs The Code;
Chapter 3: How Did We Get Here;
3.1 The Disruptors;
3.2 The Symbiosis of Open Source and Developers;
3.3 Hardware for Pennies an Hour?;
3.4 Harnessing the Power of the Internet;
3.5 The New Money Lenders;
Chapter 4: The Evidence;
4.1 What Would a Developer’s World Look Like?;
4.2 Choice and Fragmentation;
4.3 Open Source and Ubiquity;
4.4 Standards: Who Decides?;
4.5 Courting the Developer Population;
Chapter 5: What To Do? 10 Recommendations;
5.1 Get To Them Early;
5.2 Algorithmic Recruitment;
5.3 Open Source and Acqhires;
5.4 Invest in Developer Relations;
5.5 Embrace Open Source;
5.6 Go Global with Your Hiring;
5.7 Lower the Barriers to Entry;
5.8 Get into the Game with APIs;
5.9 Optimize for Developer Joy;
5.10 Talk with Developers, Not at Them;
Chapter 6: Final Thoughts;
6.1 Developers and Negotiating with Populations;

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)