The New Machiavelli: The Art of Politics in Business
  • The New Machiavelli: The Art of Politics in Business
  • The New Machiavelli: The Art of Politics in Business

The New Machiavelli: The Art of Politics in Business

by Alistair McAlpine
     
 

View All Available Formats & Editions

Ignore the latest buzz about the kinder, gentler world of new age, team-based management. It's dog-eat-dog out there, and the sooner you realize it, the better. The New Machiavelli mines Machiavelli's The Prince for the timeless rules and stratagems that can help today's business rulers survive and prosper in the jungle of greed and treachery that is commerce.

See more details below

Overview

Ignore the latest buzz about the kinder, gentler world of new age, team-based management. It's dog-eat-dog out there, and the sooner you realize it, the better. The New Machiavelli mines Machiavelli's The Prince for the timeless rules and stratagems that can help today's business rulers survive and prosper in the jungle of greed and treachery that is commerce. Alistair McAlpine enriches Machiavelli's text with scenarios from modern business, offering keen new insight into what motivates people. You'll learn the reasons why:
* Loyalty is not a reliable factor in the workplace
* Great power is held by the "little people" in a business
* It is better to spread power than to centralize it
* You should never believe your own publicity

Fail to read it at your peril.

"For most of my lifetime politicians have been trying to tell businessmen how to go about their tasks ... Both groups, however, will enjoy this shrewd commentary on Machiavelli's timeless principles of skullduggery."-Margaret Thatcher

"Anyone working in corporate America who doesn't find, read, and master Alistair McAlpine's amazing new guidebook to the art of politics in business may soon find themselves self-employed." -Charles Saatchi, Partner, M&C Saatchi

"Written in a style, like Machiavelli's own, at once didactic and charming... A work which is a standing satirical reproof to the various management manuals which promise corporate success."-Times Literary Supplement

Read More

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Much like Machiavelli's The Prince, the premise of this book can be debated. Is it a clever satire of how-to-succeed business manuals or a straightforward attempt at offering business advice? It's hard to say, but what is clear is that McAlpine, former treasurer and deputy chairman of Britain's Conservative Party under Thatcher, has written an entertaining guide to maneuvering through today's extremely political landscape by relying on The Prince. And why this book? Because of the "striking similarity between the city-states of 15th-century Italy and the great corporations of the last half of the 20th century." If that is true, then what better inspiration than Machiavelli? McAlpine (The Servant) quotes from The Prince at the beginning of each chapter to offer a jumping-off point for discussion of how to create a new business (your odds of success are much greater if you don't innovate too much), how to construct your business (the simpler the better) and how to negotiate (never attribute your motives to the opposition). The advice is sound and, while occasionally wordy, witty. (Oct.)
Library Journal
McAlpine, a former treasurer and deputy chair of the Conservative Party under Margaret Thatcher and the author of several other books, including Once a Jolly Bagman (Weidenfeld & Nicholson, 1997), introduces Machiavelli to an audience who may be familiar with Machiavelli's name and outlook but may not have read his classic work on power, The Prince (1513). McAlpine has Machiavelli's style down pat and does an exemplary job of relating Machiavellian concepts to contemporary issues and situations. But to what purpose? The Prince has stood the test of time, reading well on its own in translation. Moreover, Anthony Jay's Management and Machiavelli (LJ 2/1/68) effectively covered this territory three decades ago. Recommended only for comprehensive collections. [Readers may also wish to consider Robert Greene and Joost Elffers's adaptation of Machiavellian concepts, The 48 Laws of Power, reviewed on p. 98.--Ed.]--Steven Silkunas, Southeastern Pennsylvania Transportation Authority, Philadelphia

Read More

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780471350958
Publisher:
Wiley
Publication date:
11/03/1999
Pages:
224
Product dimensions:
9.00(w) x 6.00(h) x 0.51(d)

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >