The New Rules of Lifting: Six Basic Moves for Maximum Muscle

The New Rules of Lifting: Six Basic Moves for Maximum Muscle

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by Lou Schuler, Alwyn Cosgrove
     
 

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Want to get more out of your workout and spend less time in the gym? Many guys devote so many hours to lifting weight yet end up with so little to show for it. In many cases the problem is simple: they aren't doing exercises based on the movements their bodies were designed to do. Six basic movements - the squat, deadlift, lunge, push, pull and twist - use all of

Overview

Want to get more out of your workout and spend less time in the gym? Many guys devote so many hours to lifting weight yet end up with so little to show for it. In many cases the problem is simple: they aren't doing exercises based on the movements their bodies were designed to do. Six basic movements - the squat, deadlift, lunge, push, pull and twist - use all of the body's major muscles. And, more important, they use those muscles in co-ordinated action, the way they were designed to work. The New Rules of Lifting, now in paperback and with more than one hundred photographs, gives you more than a year's worth of workouts based on these six basic movements. Whether you're a beginner, an experienced lifter looking for new challenges, or anything in between, you can mix and match the workouts to help you get bigger, stronger and leaner. In addition, the comprehensive nutritional information provided makes The New Rules of Lifting a complete guide to reaching all your goals. If you aren't using The New Rules of Lifting, you aren't getting the best possible results.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781101218495
Publisher:
Penguin Publishing Group
Publication date:
12/29/2005
Sold by:
Penguin Group
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
320
Sales rank:
296,576
File size:
6 MB
Age Range:
18 Years

Read an Excerpt

The Exercises

Squat:

USED IN: Break-In; Fat-Loss I and III; Hypertrophy I; Strength I, II and III

SETUP: Place a barbell on the supports of the squat rack so that it's at upper-chest level. If the rack has safety rails on the sides, set them just below crotch level. (You want to be able to execute a deep squat without hitting those rails; they shouldn't come into play unless you get stuck on a maximum-effort squat, in which case you can simply slide the bar off your shoulders so it lands on the rails.) Duck under the bar and rest it across your upper traps, with your knees slightly bent. Grab the bar with a wide, overhand grip. Now lift it off the supports and step back so you can safely raise and lower the weights without hitting anything. (We didn't use a squat rack in these photos so we could give you a clearer view of the exercise form. You'll note that we use that strategy in several places in New Rules of Lifting. In Chapter 11, for example, we show barbell bench presses performed on a bench without uprights. IN all these cases, we thought it would be more helpful for you to see the model perform the exercise without the equipment blocking his arms or legs.)

LOWERING: Stand with your feet shoulder-width apart, or just a bit wider, your toes pointed straight ahead or angled out slightly, your shoulders tight and eyes focused straight ahead. Push your hips back, as if sitting in a chair, and lower yourself until your upper thighs are parallel to the floor, or your back starts to lose its natural arch, whichever comes first.

LIFTING: Push down through the middles of your feet—never the toes—and stand straight up. You want your torso going up and straightening, not leaning farther forward.

FOR HYPERTROPHY AND FAT-LOSS PROGRAMS: When Alwyn trains clients for these goals, he doesn't allow them to straighten their knees fully at the top of the movement. When you get almost to the top of the movement, immediately reverse directions and lower yourself for the next rep. In Strength programs, however, you'll need to stop at the top and take a deep breath (if not two) before the next rep.

Variations

Heels-raised back squat, one-and-a-quarter style

USED IN: Hypertrophy III

SAME AS ABOVE, EXCEPT...Set a pair of weight plates (5- or 10-pounders) on the floor behind you, and place your heels on the plates. Then lower yourself as described, but rise up just a quarter of the way. Lower yourself back down, then rise to the standing position. That's one repetition.

Front squat

USED IN: Fat-Loss II and III

SAME AS ABOVE, EXCEPT...Instead of ducking under the bar, you're going to rest it on your front shoulders. Grab it with an overhand, shoulder-width grip, and rotate your arms upward until your upper arms are nearly parallel to the floor. This turns your front deltoids into a pair of hooks to hold the bar in place. You won't be able to grasp the bar with your hands in this position; instead, let it roll to the ends of your fingertips. As long as you keep your arms up, it'll stay in place.

Meet the Author

Lou Schuler is a National Magazine Award-winning journalist, a certified strength and conditioning specialist, and the co-author of popular diet and strength-training books. He has written and edited Men's Fitness, Men's Health, Men's Health Muscle, Men's Journal, and other magazines. Alwyn Cosgrove is co-owner, with his wife Rachel, of Results Fitness in Newhall, California. During his fifteen-year career as a strength and conditioning coach, Cosgrove has earned virtually every major certification, and worked with Olympic and national-level athletes, world champions and professionals in many sports. He's also a contributor to a variety of magazines and websites, including Men's Health and Men's Fitness.

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The New Rules of Lifting 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 32 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
After reading the hardcover version of this book, I decided that I liked it enough that I would purchase the e-book. My thinking was that the e-book was just more convenient; I could take read it at work or at the gym on my iPhone. However, the e-book is virtually useless, since the diagrams are very blurry and the tables are completely unreadable. I contacted B&N about this problem a month ago, and they told me that this is how they received the book from the publisher and there wasn't anything they could do, as there are no returns. Now, I've seen other versions of the e-book that are pretty clear quality, granted for a little more in cost. I would've given the book 4 or maybe even 5 stars, but the e-book version here is virutally worthless. I cannot emphasize enough to you, save your money do NOT buy the e-book from B&N!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
the e-book is virtually useless, since the diagrams are very blurry and the tables are completely unreadable. I contacted B&N about this problem a month...(buy the book)
Olaguibel More than 1 year ago
This is the first book I read on fitness that inspired me to get into the Gym. Book is very well organized with a program very well defined; a no brainier. And most of all, achievable
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Double click should bring diagrams into separate winndow. Then you may pinch and zoom the picture. It is not the best quality but it becames readable.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I would use this book to add variety to my workouts, not to 're-define' basic strength training principles. Muscles get bigger and stronger by overloading them- it doesn't make a lick of difference whether its a single joint exercise (like bicep curls) or a compound one (like chins)- and the strength training research supports this (take the studies on isometrics and the quads which show increased strength and cross-sectional area on CT scans using just a single joint exercise-resisted leg extension). Anyway, the exercises are good for a change of pace, so I can go along with that. The only other beef I have is the recommendation to skip the back extension machine because it will blow a disc. Never seen that happen and in fact, its never been reported in any published study that I've ever read that has investigated the back machine- in fact, people get much better after using it. What I would avoid, however, are the exercises in the book that have you bend over while twisting (like the 'woodchopper' ex.). Its well known that bending plus twisting cranks on your lower lumbar discs and this type of motion has been demonstrated to herniate the lumbar discs in many studies. So all in all, I can recommend it for a change of pace, expect nothing magical, and just be safe.
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mfriedmann4 More than 1 year ago
I've used this book, and the workouts in it for over FOUR YEARS, and haven't looked at any other workout since. This book is GREAT for those who don't know much about lifting and just want a basic, quick, introductory-level guide. I've had fantastic results working out just once to twice a week. Book discusses the basic principles of working out for men, including: -How to make your workouts as efficient as possible -What exercises are best for men, depending on age -How to pair your workouts with "clean eating" -Contains several workouts to choose from, depending on your age, relative fitness and goals, including break-in workout (for those who haven't liften in some time), fat loss, strength and hypertrophy (bulking up).
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An excellent introduction to overall principles of weight-lifting, the New Rules is oriented around basic moves we use in everyday life. It makes sense, and when you start the well-developed program, your body remembers what its like to be used well and have strength. Fun to read, easy to follow, and great to experience, I tell all my friends - and strangers - about it. Get off your butt America.
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