The New Science Journalists

The New Science Journalists

by Ted Anton
     
 

In The New Science Journalists, Editors Ted Anton and Rick McCourt have gathered the best of the new science writing into one illuminating volume. What is new about the work of these journalists lies in the scale, pace, and uses of their writing. These writers bridge the gap between members of the science community and a society hungry for news about their work,… See more details below

Overview

In The New Science Journalists, Editors Ted Anton and Rick McCourt have gathered the best of the new science writing into one illuminating volume. What is new about the work of these journalists lies in the scale, pace, and uses of their writing. These writers bridge the gap between members of the science community and a society hungry for news about their work, acting not only as reporters and commentators, but also as investigators, researchers, detectives, and storytellers.

The editors have showcased three very different kinds of writers. The first group explores the complexities of our universe with childlike wonder, and includes Diane Ackerman, John Seabrook, and Elisabeth Rosenthal. The second group, relentless investigators who expose the inside stories of scientific research, includes Deborah Blum, Robert Capers, Eric Lipton, and John Crewdson. And the third group of writers, who dig through data uncovering trends that researchers themselves miss, features Timothy Ferris, E.O. Wilson, James Gleick, and many more.

These writers are helping to broaden the very boundaries of science by making complex topics such as chemistry, physics, biotechnology, and ecology accessible and entertaining to readers of every kind. Combining superb prose and compelling subjects, The New Science Journalists examines some of the most fascinating issues of our times.

Read More

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
``Is Humanity Suicidal?'' asks E.O. Wilson, Harvard sociobiologist, in the final essay of this collection, a sampler of the emerging literary discipline of science journalism. Wilson answers his purposeful question with wistful optimism. Editors Anton and McCourt-themselves science writers-obviously chose the volume's authors, subjects, styles and publication sources to showcase the genre's broad possibilities. Settings range from a creepy, vermin-infested bat cave in Arizona to the cold and lonely outer reaches of a forever-expanding universe (from Charles Bowden's Blue Desert and Dennis Overbye's Lonely Hearts of the Cosmos, respectively). Novelistic suspense and intensity are interwoven with matter-of-fact journalistic prose. Personality pieces profile quixotic individuals who have explored arcane corners of reality (like Paul Hoffman's Atlantic Monthly portrait of mathematician Paul Erdos), as well as those who have changed the spirit of our culture (John Seabrook's New Yorker piece on software guru Bill Gates). The collection is long and will probably require several sittings from the thoughtful reader. Excerpts from book-length sources are somewhat less satisfying than stand-alone pieces, but still, for those who like to be informed while being entertained, the works in this volume are witty and wise. (Apr.)
Library Journal - Library Journal
This is an interesting collection of writers, although the title tends toward oversell: E.O. Wilson, for example, is hardly "new," and while many of these writers have carved out a niche in chronicling the natural world, they are still not household names, even in the households of journalists. Much of the work is quite fine-James Gleick on Richard Feynman, Diane Ackerman (from A Natural History of the Senses, LJ 5/1/90), New York Times reporter Natalie Angier-but some of the selections are by writers who don't seem to fit the editors' definition of "literary science" journalists, like the clever and witty profile of the man who discovered buckyballs by a writer who flunked chemistry. The introduction is superb as a summary of how and why science journalism has changed. This is a good choice for community and general science collections because the writers are highly readable. Journalism and communications collections should also consider seriously.-Mark L. Shelton, Worcester, Mass.

Read More

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780345383655
Publisher:
Random House Publishing Group
Publication date:
03/14/1995
Edition description:
1st ed
Pages:
368
Product dimensions:
5.15(w) x 8.02(h) x 0.77(d)

Meet the Author

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >