The New Sweater (Hueys Series #1)

Overview

The New York Times Best Illustrated Picture Book, now in an oversized trim for added value and fun!

The Hueys are small and mischievous, unique compared to the world's other creatures--but hardly unique to one another. You see, each Huey looks the same, thinks the same, and does the same exact things. So you can imagine the chaos when one of them has the idea of knitting a sweater! It seems like a good idea at the time--he is quite proud of it, in fact--but it does make him ...

See more details below
Hardcover
$13.81
BN.com price
(Save 23%)$17.99 List Price

Pick Up In Store

Reserve and pick up in 60 minutes at your local store

Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (25) from $2.82   
  • New (13) from $3.28   
  • Used (12) from $2.82   
Note: Kids' Club Eligible. See More Details.

Overview

The New York Times Best Illustrated Picture Book, now in an oversized trim for added value and fun!

The Hueys are small and mischievous, unique compared to the world's other creatures--but hardly unique to one another. You see, each Huey looks the same, thinks the same, and does the same exact things. So you can imagine the chaos when one of them has the idea of knitting a sweater! It seems like a good idea at the time--he is quite proud of it, in fact--but it does make him different from the others. So the rest of the Hueys, in turn, decide that they want to be different too! How? By knitting the exact same sweater, of course!

The first in a series of child-friendly concept books by the #1 bestselling artist of The Day the Crayons Quit, How to Catch a StarStuck, and This Moose Belongs to Me, The New Sweater proves that standing apart can be accomplished even when standing together.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
First in a planned series, Jeffers’s (Stuck) small-scale fable is equal parts whimsy and skinny-tie sophistication. Low-key pencil drawings, sleek typography, and a smart layout deliver the sophistication, and the Hueys contribute the whimsy. Like the crowd-pleasing minions in the film Despicable Me, the Hueys are egg-shaped beings who speak in monosyllables (“eh?” “oh!”) and enjoy a genial if colorless existence. “The thing about the Hueys... was that they were all the same,” writes Jeffers. Then a Huey named Rupert subverts the social contract by knitting a bright orange sweater with a zigzag pattern. Appalled, the other Hueys glare at Rupert as he walks past in his sweater, whistling nonchalantly. Soon the rest of the Hueys start knitting sweaters, too: “Before long, they were all different, and no one was the same anymore.” It takes yet another daring sartorial move by Rupert to lead the Hueys to authentic individuality at last. The story is over almost as soon as it has begun, a polite salute to liberated thinking that delivers its message with a feather-light touch. Ages 3–7. (May)
From the Publisher
* A New York Times Best Illustrated Book of 2012 *New York Times Book Review

"The spare but adorable artwork makes this picture book work as a quirky diversion, but it doesn’t diminish the understated, deftly delivered lesson for those moments when kids need a nudge to help be themselves, or be OK when everyone else wants to be just like them."--Booklist, starred review — Booklist (starred review)

"The minimalist appearance of the Hueys will make them easy for kids to imitate artistically, and those who can't wait for the Hueys' next outing (jacket copy indicates this is the beginning of a series) may want to create their own Huey-themed adventures."--BCCB — Bulletin of the Center for Children's Books

Booklist
*STARRED REVIEW* "The spare but adorable artwork makes this picture book work as a quirky diversion, but it doesn’t diminish the understated, deftly delivered lesson for those moments when kids need a nudge to help be themselves, or be OK when everyone else wants to be just like them.
New York Times Book Review

* A New YorkTimes Best Illustrated Book of 2012 *
Bulletin of the Center for Children's Books

"The minimalist appearance of the Hueys will make them easy for kids to imitate artistically, and those who can't wait for the Hueys' next outing (jacket copy indicates this is the beginning of a series) may want to create their own Huey-themed adventures."--BCCB
Booklist (starred review)

"The spare but adorable artwork makes this picture book work as a quirky diversion, but it doesn’t diminish the understated, deftly delivered lesson for those moments when kids need a nudge to help be themselves, or be OK when everyone else wants to be just like them."--Booklist, starred review
The Bulletin for the Center for Children's Books
The minimalist appearance of the Hueys will make them easy for kids to imitate artistically, and those who can't wait for the Hueys' next outing (jacket copy indicates this is the beginning of a series) may want to create their own Huey-themed adventures.
Booklist (starred review)
*STARRED REVIEW* "The spare but adorable artwork makes this picture book work as a quirky diversion, but it doesn’t diminish the understated, deftly delivered lesson for those moments when kids need a nudge to help be themselves, or be OK when everyone else wants to be just like them."
Bulletin of the Center for Children's Books
The minimalist appearance of the Hueys will make them easy for kids to imitate artistically, and those who can't wait for the Hueys' next outing (jacket copy indicates this is the beginning of a series) may want to create their own Huey-themed adventures.
Booklist
The spare but adorable artwork makes this picture book work as a quirky diversion, but it doesn’t diminish the understated, deftly delivered lesson for those moments when kids need a nudge to help be themselves, or be OK when everyone else wants to be just like them.
New York Times Book Review
* A New YorkTimes Best Illustrated Book of 2012 *
Children's Literature - Ken Marantz and Sylvia Marantz
The Hueys, egg-shaped folks with stick arms and legs and dots for eyes, return for a new adventure. They all look the same and do the same things. But one day, one named Rupert knits himself a fancy orange sweater. He is proud of it, but most of the Hueys are horrified, because all Hueys are supposed to be the same. Still, Gillespie thinks that being different is interesting, so he knits himself a matching sweater. "Being different was catching on...." Soon the other Hueys want to be different too, and knit sweaters, until they are all "different" and look the same again. Then Rupert decides to wear a hat. "And that changed everything." On the back end pages we see very different Hueys from those in the front. Black pencil lines "and a bit of orange" are manipulated effectively to produce the Hueys in action. Occasional solid color pages add visual interest but no narrative content. The story's well-developed message is further emphasized by the contrasting front and back end pages. Reviewer: Ken Marantz and Sylvia Marantz
Kirkus Reviews
The clothes make the Huey in Jeffers' picture-book ode to nonconformity. In what promises to be the first in a series about the Hueys, little egg-shaped creatures with just lines for limbs, the cast of characters are indistinguishable from one another until a fellow named Rupert knits himself an orange sweater. The text plainly states that "most of the other Hueys were horrified!" when Huey strolls by in his jaunty new duds. And the subsequent line, "Rupert stood out like a sore thumb," is delightfully understated, since his oval form wrapped up in an orange sweater looks rather sore-thumb–like. Then, another Huey named Gillespie decides that "being different was interesting," and he knits himself a sweater just like Rupert's. This gets the proverbial ball of yarn rolling, and, in scenes reminiscent of The Sneetches, soon many, many Hueys are knitting and donning identical orange sweaters in order to "be different too!" In Jeffers' expert hands, the message of respecting individuality comes through with a light touch as Rupert concludes the story by deciding to shake things up again as he dons a hat. "And that changed everything," reads the closing text, with a page turn revealing a little parade of Hueys decked out in a broad array of different clothing, from feather boas to pirate hats. A joyful take on a serious lesson. (Picture book. 3-6)
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780399257674
  • Publisher: Penguin Young Readers Group
  • Publication date: 5/24/2012
  • Series: Hueys Series, #1
  • Pages: 32
  • Sales rank: 174,688
  • Age range: 3 - 5 Years
  • Product dimensions: 10.90 (w) x 10.80 (h) x 0.40 (d)

Meet the Author

Oliver Jeffers
 Oliver Jeffers (www.oliverjeffersworld.com) makes art and tells stories. His books include the #1 blockbuster The Day the Crayons QuitHow to Catch a Star; Lost and Found, which was the recipient of the prestigious Nestle Children’s Book Prize Gold Award in the U.K. and was later adapted into an award-winning animated film; The Way Back Home; The Incredible Book Eating Boy; The Great Paper Caper; The Heart and the Bottle, which was made into a highly acclaimed iPad application narrated by Helena Bonham Carter; Up and Down, the New York Times bestselling Stuck; The Hueys in the New Sweater, a New York Times Best Illustrated Book of the Year; and This Moose Belongs to Me, a New York Times bestseller. Originally from Belfast, Northern Ireland, Oliver now lives and works in Brooklyn, New York.
 
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)