The New Testament Code: The Cup of the Lord, the Damascus Convenant, and the Blood of Christ - Uncoverin g the Truth about James the Brother of Jesus and the Dead Sea Scrolls by Robert Eisenman, Hardcover | Barnes & Noble
The New Testament Code: The Cup of the Lord, the Damascus Convenant, and the Blood of Christ - Uncoverin g the Truth about James the Brother of Jesus and the Dead Sea Scrolls

The New Testament Code: The Cup of the Lord, the Damascus Convenant, and the Blood of Christ - Uncoverin g the Truth about James the Brother of Jesus and the Dead Sea Scrolls

by Robert Eisenman
     
 
It’s finally here – world-renowned scholar and best-selling author Robert Eisenman’s long-awaited sequel to James the Brother of Jesus. Is there an interconnecting code behind the New Testament and the Dead Sea Scrolls? 1,000 pages of new research shows that there is. There are many ‘Code’s and ‘Code

Overview

It’s finally here – world-renowned scholar and best-selling author Robert Eisenman’s long-awaited sequel to James the Brother of Jesus. Is there an interconnecting code behind the New Testament and the Dead Sea Scrolls? 1,000 pages of new research shows that there is. There are many ‘Code’s and ‘Code’ Books – some imaginary, some products of wishful thinking, and some even fraudulent; but ‘the Code’ in Professor Eisenman’s new book The New Testament Code: The Cup of the Lord, the Damascus Covenant, and the Blood of Christ really exists.

In identifying the Scrolls as the literature of “the Messianic Movement in Palestine,” Robert Eisenman – who broke the monopoly over the Dead Sea Scrolls and was the first to identify “the James Ossuary” as a fraud – demonstrates the integral relationship of James the brother of Jesus to the Righteous Teacher of the Dead Sea Scrolls, ‘decoding’ many famous and beloved sayings in the Gospels, such as “Every Plant which My Heavenly Father has not planted shall be uprooted,” “Do not throw Holy Things to dogs,” “A man shall not be known by what goes into his mouth but, rather, by what comes out of it,” “Even the dogs eat the crumbs under the table,” and “These are the signs that the Lord did in Cana of Galilee.”

In doing so, he deciphers the way the picture of “Jesus” was put together in the Gospels, in the process clarifying the real history of Palestine in the First Century and, as a consequence, what can be known about the real “Jesus” of that time. At the same time he unravels the real code behind a pivotal New Testament allusion like “This is the Cup of the New Covenant in my Blood,” connecting it to “the New Covenant in the Land of Damascus” and “drinking the Cup of the Wrath of God” in the Dead Sea Scrolls; and uncovers the Truth about what really happened in Palestine at that time, not what the enemies of those making war against Rome wanted people to think happened.

Offering a thorough point-by-point analysis of James’ relationship to the Dead Sea Scrolls, he illumines such subjects as the “Pella Flight,” “the Wilderness Camps,” and Paul as “Herodian,” exposing Peter’s true historical role as “a prototypical Essene” who was used in the Gospels and the Book of Acts as a mouthpiece for aboriginal Anti-Semitism. In making these arguments and exposing these overwrites, a crucial new point that emerges is his identification of the Dead Sea Scrolls document known as the MMT as a ‘Jamesian’ Letter to the person the Early Church Fathers identify as “the Great King of the Peoples beyond the Euphrates.”

The crowning point of his arguments is his final exposition of the relationship of “the New Covenant in the Land of Damascus” of the Dead Sea Scrolls to “the Last Supper” in the Gospels and “the Cup” connected to both. Did Paul know the meaning of the famous Damascus Document (discovered in a Synagogue Repository in Old Cairo in 1897), “to set the Holy Things up according to their precise specifications” – or the reverse of it, as Peter was presented as discovering in the Books of Acts – “to make no distinctions between Holy and profane”? The final mysteries of the Dead Sea Scrolls as they relate to Peter, Paul, and James will be elucidated. Eisenman’s many readers will not be disappointed.

Editorial Reviews

Library Journal

In his 1997 book, James the Brother of Jesus, Eisenman (Middle Eastern religions & archaeology, California State Univ.) argued that James is to be identified with the Teacher of Righteousness of the Dead Sea Scrolls and that he was really the one around whom the Messianic movement in first-century Palestine revolved. In this sequel, he culls a number of sources, non-Christian as well as Christian, to show that the writings of the New Testament-especially those of Paul-are anti-Semitic, Greco-Roman works that elevate Jesus into the central role. Once one cracks the code, Eisenman contends, one will find that many of the New Testament's familiar phrases refer to Essene concepts found in the Dead Sea Scrolls. The connections Eisenman makes between New Testament texts and Essene concepts seem at times a stretch, but those who accept the argument he made in his earlier work will appreciate his extensive use of sources. With a style verging at times on ridicule, Eisenman puts forth an argument that challenges the traditional view of early Christian origins. Joseph A. Fitzmyer's The Dead Sea Scrolls and Christian Originsoffers a less contentious treatment of the topic. For comprehensive religion collections.
—Augustine J. Curley

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781842931868
Publisher:
Watkins Media
Publication date:
01/01/1999
Pages:
244
Product dimensions:
6.60(w) x 9.40(h) x 2.20(d)

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