The New Victorians: A Young Woman's Challenge to the Old Feminist Order [NOOK Book]

Overview

Journalist Rene Denfeld explains why her generation has become alienated from the women's movement, maintaining that the actions of the movement's current leadership have actually encouraged a return to the kind of sexual repression and political powerlessness challenged by feminists in the 1970s. Here she offers a practial battle plan which includes confronting the issues of child care and birth control, working for equal government representation, and treating sexual assault ...
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The New Victorians: A Young Woman's Challenge to the Old Feminist Order

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Overview

Journalist Rene Denfeld explains why her generation has become alienated from the women's movement, maintaining that the actions of the movement's current leadership have actually encouraged a return to the kind of sexual repression and political powerlessness challenged by feminists in the 1970s. Here she offers a practial battle plan which includes confronting the issues of child care and birth control, working for equal government representation, and treating sexual assault as a serious crime.

In a gutsy and controversial book that is sure to raise the hackles of many established feminists, Denfeld explains the flight of young women from the feminist movement and shows what women must do to reclaim feminism.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Arguing that contemporary feminism has bogged down in an often repressive extremism, Denfeld contends that her generation needs to reframe the movement along more tolerant lines. Nov.
Library Journal
Books in which young women bash the feminism of their mothers' generation have become something of a growth industry of late: Katie Roiphe's The Morning After: Sex, Fear, and Feminism on Campus LJ 9/15/93 and Christina Hoff Summers's Who Stole Feminism: How Women Have Betrayed Women LJ 6/15/94 come immediately to mind. This latest contribution to the genre, by a freelance writer and amateur boxer, argues that while many under-30s women believe in and desperately need feminist causes, they have been alienated by the radical goddess-worshipping wierdos who she maintains now dominate the women's movement. The thesis that feminism is in danger of dissipating its once-vital energies in a neosocial purity campaign has been much elaborated on elsewhere, but here it is undermined by a host of contradictions, a reliance on pop-culture sources such as Glamour magazine, and an unfortunate tendency to generalize from carefully selected tidbits of evidence. There is a place for this sort of thing, but it is only in large popular collections, where there is certain to be some demand. [Previewed in Prepub Alert, LJ 11/1/94.]-Beverly Miller, Boise State Univ. Lib., Id.
Alice Joyce
Just how is feminism currently defined and what is its meaning to the women--especially younger women--of today? Denfeld challenges the often disturbing and generally extremist nature of contemporary feminism by examining many issues being batted about by leading theorists. Key themes are debated; these include the antipornography activists' attacks on feminists who are against censorship in any form, the relevance of goddess worship, the trend in current dogma to condemn women's strides toward sexual liberation, and the tendency to inflate statistics that perpetrate a view of nearly all women as being victimized by men. Denfeld is neither conservative nor reactionary. Her observations are clear-sighted appraisals of how the movement alienates the great majority of women. She concludes with a treatise on reclaiming feminism, setting forth ideas on working toward meaningful change in such areas as child care, abortion rights, and sexual violence.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780446565233
  • Publisher: Grand Central Publishing
  • Publication date: 9/26/2009
  • Sold by: Hachette Digital, Inc.
  • Format: eBook
  • Sales rank: 1,310,078
  • File size: 573 KB

Table of Contents

Acknowledgments
Introduction 1
Pt. I Sexual Purity
1 The Antiphallic Campaign: Male Bashing and Sexual Politics 25
2 Victim Mythology: Rape and the Feminist Agenda 58
3 Dirty Pictures: The Feminist Fight Against Pornography 90
Pt. II The Moral Pedestal
4 The Goddess Within: The New Feminist Religion 127
5 Overthrowing the Patriarchy: The Feminist Utopian Vision 154
6 The Passive Voice: Inertia Instead of Action 184
Pt. III The New Victorians
7 Repeating History: The Feminist Descent into Victorian Morality 215
8 Why Young Women Are Abandoning the Movement 245
9 The Final Wave: Reclaiming Feminism 266
Notes 281
Index 331
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