The New York Stories

The New York Stories

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by John O'Hara
     
 

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Collected for the first time, the New York stories of John O'Hara, "among the greatest short story writers in English, or in any other language" (Brendan Gill, Here at The New Yorker)

Collected for the first time, here are the New York stories of one of the twentieth century’s definitive  chroniclers of the city—the…  See more details below

Overview

Collected for the first time, the New York stories of John O'Hara, "among the greatest short story writers in English, or in any other language" (Brendan Gill, Here at The New Yorker)

Collected for the first time, here are the New York stories of one of the twentieth century’s definitive  chroniclers of the city—the speakeasies and highballs, social climbers and cinema stars, mistresses and powerbrokers, unsparingly observed by a popular American master of realism. Spanning his four-decade career, these more than thirty refreshingly frank, sparely written stories are among John O’Hara’s finest work, exploring the materialist aspirations and sexual exploits of flawed, prodigally human characters and showcasing the snappy dialogue, telling details and ironic narrative twists that made him the most-published short story writer in the history of the New Yorker.

For more than seventy years, Penguin has been the leading publisher of classic literature in the English-speaking world. With more than 1,700 titles, Penguin Classics represents a global bookshelf of the best works throughout history and across genres and disciplines. Readers trust the series to provide authoritative texts enhanced by introductions and notes by distinguished scholars and contemporary authors, as well as up-to-date translations by award-winning translators.


From the Trade Paperback edition.

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
“You can binge on his collections, the way some people binge on Mad Men, and for some of the same reasons.” —Lorin Stein, editor of The Paris Review

“Don Draper is an O’Hara character if ever there was one. . . . The stories have the tang of genuine observation and reporting. . . . You’re aware of how brilliantly O’Hara uses dialogue to convey exposition, and of how often his people, like Hemingway’s, leave unsaid what is really on their minds. . . . O’Hara [was] a master of the short story . . . The New York anthology . . . is part of a welcome Penguin effort to reissue his work in paperback.” Charles McGrath, The New York Times Book Review

“An author I love is John O’Hara. . . . I think he’s been forgotten by time, but for dialogue lovers, he’s a goldmine of inspiration.” —Douglas Coupland, Shelf Awareness

"Among the greatest short-story writers in English, or in any other language...  [He helped] to invent what the world came to call The New Yorker short story." —Brendan Gill, Here at The New Yorker

"O'Hara occupies a unique position in our contemporary literature.... He is the only American writer to whom America presents itself as a social scene in the way it once presented itself to Henry James, or France to Proust." —Lionel Trilling,The New York Times

"This is fiction, but it has, for me, the clang of truth." —John Updike

“O’Hara’s eyes and ears have been spared nothing.” —Dorothy Parker

“A writer of dream-sharp tales, crisp yet dense.”Los Angeles Times

“O’Hara practices the classic form of the modern short story developed by Joyce and perfected by Hemingway. . . . His coverage is worthy of a Balzac.” —E. L. Doctorow, from the Foreword

“Superb . . . The 32 stories inhabit the Technicolor vernaculars of taxi drivers, barbers, paper pushers and society matrons. . . . Undoubtedly, between the 1930s and the 1970s, [O’Hara] was American fiction’s greatest eavesdropper, recording the everyday speech and tone of all strata of midcentury society. . . . What elevates O’Hara above slice-of-life portraitists like Damon Runyon and Ring Lardner is the turmoil glimpsed beneath the vibrant surfaces.” —The Wall Street Journal

“His short stories are gorgeous broken scenes of American life . . . and his style and themes—a bridge, if you will, between F. Scott Fitzgerald and John Updike—remain painfully and beautifully relevant today.” Huffington Post

 

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780698136250
Publisher:
Penguin Publishing Group
Publication date:
08/27/2013
Sold by:
Penguin Group
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
400
Sales rank:
331,322
File size:
2 MB
Age Range:
18 Years

What People are saying about this

From the Publisher
“You can binge on his collections, the way some people binge on Mad Men, and for some of the same reasons.” —Lorin Stein, editor of The Paris Review

“Don Draper is an O’Hara character if ever there was one. . . . The stories have the tang of genuine observation and reporting. . . . You’re aware of how brilliantly O’Hara uses dialogue to convey exposition, and of how often his people, like Hemingway’s, leave unsaid what is really on their minds. . . . O’Hara [was] a master of the short story . . . The New York anthology . . . is part of a welcome Penguin effort to reissue his work in paperback.” Charles McGrath, The New York Times Book Review

“An author I love is John O’Hara. . . . I think he’s been forgotten by time, but for dialogue lovers, he’s a goldmine of inspiration.” —Douglas Coupland, Shelf Awareness

"Among the greatest short-story writers in English, or in any other language...  [He helped] to invent what the world came to call The New Yorker short story." —Brendan Gill, Here at The New Yorker

"O'Hara occupies a unique position in our contemporary literature.... He is the only American writer to whom America presents itself as a social scene in the way it once presented itself to Henry James, or France to Proust." —Lionel Trilling,The New York Times

"This is fiction, but it has, for me, the clang of truth." —John Updike

“O’Hara’s eyes and ears have been spared nothing.” —Dorothy Parker

“A writer of dream-sharp tales, crisp yet dense.” Los Angeles Times

“O’Hara practices the classic form of the modern short story developed by Joyce and perfected by Hemingway. . . . His coverage is worthy of a Balzac.” —E. L. Doctorow, from the Foreword

“Superb . . . The 32 stories inhabit the Technicolor vernaculars of taxi drivers, barbers, paper pushers and society matrons. . . . Undoubtedly, between the 1930s and the 1970s, [O’Hara] was American fiction’s greatest eavesdropper, recording the everyday speech and tone of all strata of midcentury society. . . . What elevates O’Hara above slice-of-life portraitists like Damon Runyon and Ring Lardner is the turmoil glimpsed beneath the vibrant surfaces.” —The Wall Street Journal

“His short stories are gorgeous broken scenes of American life . . . and his style and themes—a bridge, if you will, between F. Scott Fitzgerald and John Updike—remain painfully and beautifully relevant today.” Huffington Post

 

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Meet the Author

John O’Hara (1905–1970) was one of the most prominent American writers of the twentieth century. Championed by Ernest Hemingway, F. Scott Fitzgerald, and Dorothy Parker, he wrote seventeen novels, including Appointment in Samarra, his first, BUtterfield 8, which was made into a film starring Elizabeth Taylor, and Ten North Frederick, which won the National Book Award, and he had more stories published in the New Yorker than anyone in the history of the magazine. Born in Pottsville, Pennsylvania, he lived for many years in New York and in Princeton, New Jersey, where he died.

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The New York Stories 4.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
4 clans besides the lake, many seasons ago. <p> Desertstorm padded along the pebbily shore, sighing. It was the full moon, and all four clans were meeting at the island. Desertstorm, however, was not happy to go. He had grown tired with the clans. Their selfishness, and short sightedness. They still told stories about the Great Battle, even though it had happened moons ago. <p> Looking up, he saw his leader, Birchstar, flick her tail and start moving across the tree bridge. Even his leader was like them. She refused to listen to him, saying his ideas were treacherous and would not help Thunderclan. He jumped as something brushed him. "Move it!"snapped Stonefang. <p> "Sorry...." muttered Desertstorm, leaping up and grasping onto the tree bridge with his claws. He scotted quickly across, still worried he'd fall in like he had as an apprentice. Reaching the end, he raced into the clearing, stopping as a mass of scents reached him. Riverclan, Windclan, Shadowclan.... it seemed Thunderclan was last. Birchstar lept up with the other leaders and let out a yowl. "The gathering shall begin! Who shall speak first?" Whitestar of Shafowclan stept forward. "I shall," He said, dipping his head to Birchstar. "Leaf bare has been good to us. We had a slight problem with a fox, but our patrols taught it that our claws are sharper than its!" There was a few yowls of agreement from the Shadowclan cats below. <p> The other leaders made their reports, with nothing significant to report. As Birchstar stept up, Desertstorm stood up. "Birchstar, may I speak?"he called, clenching his claws. Birchstar looked startled then narrowed her eyes. "Well....." <p> Minnowstar of Windclan looked up. "Let him speak."her eyes glittered happily. Birchstar sighed, but dipped her head. <p> Desertstorm stood up, cleared his throat, and began to speak. "Cats of all clans! The time has come to help each other! We are all starving!" As he said that, Birchstar growled in fury. "We must help each other! Be as one clan!" Yowls of shock and defiance filled the air. "That is treacherous thinking!" Spat Whitestar. "Birchstar, if you-" birchstar cut him off. "I know. Desertstorm..... Deserstorm, that cannot be permitted, and you have been causing trouble! I hereby banish you from Thunderclan!" Gasps filled the air, but all Desertstorm did was nod. "So be it."he turned and stalked toward the tree branch, as the stars glittered coldly above.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago